Quantum teleportation

teleportationEntanglement swappingentanglement-assisted teleportationteleportentangling her moleculesgate teleportationphysics departmentQuantumquantum data from one chip to anotherquantum state of a particle could be teleported
Quantum teleportation is a process in which quantum information (e.g. the exact state of an atom or photon) can be transmitted (exactly, in principle) from one location to another, with the help of classical communication and previously shared quantum entanglement between the sending and receiving location.wikipedia
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Quantum information

quantum information theory quantum information theoryinformation
Quantum teleportation is a process in which quantum information (e.g. the exact state of an atom or photon) can be transmitted (exactly, in principle) from one location to another, with the help of classical communication and previously shared quantum entanglement between the sending and receiving location.

Quantum Experiments at Space Scale

QUESSMiciusMicius satellite
The latest reported record distance for quantum teleportation is 1400 km by the group of Jian-Wei Pan using the Micius satellite for space-based quantum teleportation.
QUESS is a proof-of-concept mission designed to facilitate quantum optics experiments over long distances to allow the development of quantum encryption and quantum teleportation technology.

Gilles Brassard

G. BrassardBrassardBrassard, Gilles
The seminal paper first expounding the idea of quantum teleportation was published by C. H. Bennett, G. Brassard, C. Crépeau, R. Jozsa, A. Peres, and W. K. Wootters in 1993.
Brassard is best known for his fundamental work in quantum cryptography, quantum teleportation, quantum entanglement distillation, quantum pseudo-telepathy, and the classical simulation of quantum entanglement.

Physical information

informationclassical informationclassical
Quantum teleportation is a process in which quantum information (e.g. the exact state of an atom or photon) can be transmitted (exactly, in principle) from one location to another, with the help of classical communication and previously shared quantum entanglement between the sending and receiving location.
Because of its more general utility, the remainder of this article will deal primarily with classical information, although quantum information theory does also have some potential applications (quantum computing, quantum cryptography, quantum teleportation) that are currently being actively explored by both theorists and experimentalists.

Richard Jozsa

R. JozsaJozsa, Richard
The seminal paper first expounding the idea of quantum teleportation was published by C. H. Bennett, G. Brassard, C. Crépeau, R. Jozsa, A. Peres, and W. K. Wootters in 1993.
A pioneer of his field, he is the co-author of the Deutsch–Jozsa algorithm and one of the co-inventors of quantum teleportation.

William Wootters

WoottersBill WoottersW. K. Wootters
The seminal paper first expounding the idea of quantum teleportation was published by C. H. Bennett, G. Brassard, C. Crépeau, R. Jozsa, A. Peres, and W. K. Wootters in 1993.
He is known for his contributions to the theory of quantum entanglement including quantitative measures of it, entanglement-assisted communication (notably quantum teleportation, discovered by Wootters and collaborators in 1993) and entanglement distillation.

Asher Peres

PeresA. Peres
The seminal paper first expounding the idea of quantum teleportation was published by C. H. Bennett, G. Brassard, C. Crépeau, R. Jozsa, A. Peres, and W. K. Wootters in 1993.
Among other things, he helped to develop the Peres-Horodecki criterion for quantum entanglement, as well as the concept of quantum teleportation, and collaborated with others on quantum information and special relativity.

Quantum entanglement

entanglemententangledentangled state
Quantum teleportation is a process in which quantum information (e.g. the exact state of an atom or photon) can be transmitted (exactly, in principle) from one location to another, with the help of classical communication and previously shared quantum entanglement between the sending and receiving location. The actual teleportation protocol requires that an entangled quantum state or Bell state be created, and its two parts shared between two locations (the source and destination, or Alice and Bob).
The authors claimed that this result was achieved by entanglement swapping between two pairs of entangled photons after measuring the polarization of one photon of the early pair, and that it proves that quantum non-locality applies not only to space but also to time.

Charles H. Bennett (physicist)

Charles H. BennettCharles BennettBennett
The term was coined by physicist Charles Bennett.
In 1993 Bennett and Brassard, in collaboration with others, discovered "quantum teleportation", an effect in which the complete information in an unknown quantum state is decomposed into purely classical information and purely non-classical Einstein–Podolsky–Rosen (EPR paradox) correlations, sent through two separate channels, and later reassembled in a new location to produce an exact replica of the original quantum state that was destroyed in the sending process.

Teleportation

teleportteleportingteleporter
Although the name is inspired by the teleportation commonly used in fiction, quantum teleportation is limited to the transfer of information rather than matter itself.
In 1993, Bennett et al proposed that a quantum state of a particle could be teleported to another distant particle, but the two particles do not move at all.

Claude Crépeau

Claude CrepeauC. Crépeau
The seminal paper first expounding the idea of quantum teleportation was published by C. H. Bennett, G. Brassard, C. Crépeau, R. Jozsa, A. Peres, and W. K. Wootters in 1993.
Prof. Crépeau is best known for his fundamental work in zero-knowledge proof, multi-party computing, quantum cryptography, and quantum teleportation.

Quantum channel

quantum communicationQuantum communication channelchannels (completely positive trace-preserving maps)
In essence, a certain kind of quantum channel between two sites must be established first, before a qubit can be moved.
This is precisely the statement of the no teleportation theorem, which says classical teleportation (not to be confused with entanglement-assisted teleportation) is impossible.

Bell state

Bell measurementBell statesebit
The actual teleportation protocol requires that an entangled quantum state or Bell state be created, and its two parts shared between two locations (the source and destination, or Alice and Bob).
Understanding of the Bell states is essential in analysis of quantum communication (such as superdense coding) and quantum teleportation.

Pan Jianwei

Jian-Wei PanJianwei Pan
The latest reported record distance for quantum teleportation is 1400 km by the group of Jian-Wei Pan using the Micius satellite for space-based quantum teleportation.

No-deleting theorem

quantum no-deleting theorem
For example, quantum information can be neither copied (the no-cloning theorem) nor destroyed (the no-deleting theorem).

No-communication theorem

no communication theoremno-signalling conditionno-signalling principle
However such correlations can never be used to transmit any information faster than the speed of light, a statement encapsulated in the no-communication theorem.

Categorical quantum mechanics

Categorical quantizationquantum mechanics
A detailed diagrammatic derivation of entanglement swapping has been given by Bob Coecke, presented in terms of categorical quantum mechanics.

Continuous-variable quantum information

continuous-variablecontinuous-variable quantum information processingcontinuous-variable quantum information theory
The generalization to infinite-dimensional so-called continuous-variable systems was proposed in and lead to the first teleportation experiment that worked unconditionally.
Quantum teleportation of continuous-variable quantum information was achieved by optical methods in 1998.

EPR paradox

Einstein–Podolsky–Rosen paradoxEPREinstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox
Thus, an observation resulting from a measurement choice made at one point in spacetime seems to instantaneously affect outcomes in another region, even though light hasn't yet had time to travel the distance; a conclusion seemingly at odds with special relativity (EPR paradox).

Quantum complex network

The successful quantum teleportation experiments in 1998 followed by the development of first quantum communication networks in 2004, opened the possibility of quantum communication being used in a large scale in the future.

Qubit

qubitsquantum bitquantum bits
While it has proven possible to teleport one or more qubits of information between two (entangled) quanta, this has not yet been achieved between anything larger than molecules.
The Bell state forms part of the setup of the superdense coding, quantum teleportation, and entangled quantum cryptography algorithms.

Controlled NOT gate

CNOTcontrolled-NOTC-NOT
In 2018, physicists at Yale demonstrated a deterministic teleported CNOT operation between logically encoded qubits.
A common application of the C NOT gate is to maximally entangle two qubits into the Bell state; this forms part of the setup of the superdense coding, quantum teleportation, and entangled quantum cryptography algorithms.

Quantum energy teleportation

teleport energy
The idea is a continuation of work by computer scientist Charles H. Bennett on quantum teleportation C.H. Bennett, et al. in 1993 and experimentally confirmed by various experiments in the following years.

No-cloning theorem

no cloning theoremno-cloningcloning
For example, quantum information can be neither copied (the no-cloning theorem) nor destroyed (the no-deleting theorem).

Quantum nonlocality

nonlocalitynon-localitynonlocal
It is important to recognise that entanglement is more commonly viewed as an algebraic concept, noted for being a precedent to nonlocality as well as quantum teleportation and superdense coding, whereas nonlocality is interpreted according to experimental statistics and is much more involved with the foundations and interpretations of quantum mechanics.