Quarantine

quarantine stationquarantinedquarantiningquarantinableQuarantine Act 1710quarantine hospitalquarantine shipsclose their bordersisolationplague hospital
A quarantine is a restriction on the movement of people and goods which is intended to prevent the spread of disease or pests.wikipedia
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Cordon sanitaire

cordona 40 to 60 kilometer wide barrier implemented to stop the spread of diseasea policy of refusing to co-operate
Quarantine may be used interchangeably with cordon sanitaire, and although the terms are related, cordon sanitaire refers to the restriction of movement of people into or out of a defined geographic area, such as a community, in order to prevent an infection from spreading.
It may be used interchangeably with the term "quarantine", and although the terms are related, cordon sanitaire refers to the restriction of movement of people into or out of a defined geographic area, such as a community.

Freedom of movement

free movementright to travelmovement
A quarantine is a restriction on the movement of people and goods which is intended to prevent the spread of disease or pests.
Where an individual presents a health threat due to infection with a contagious disease, the government may quarantine that person, restricting their movement for the safety of others.

North and South Brother Islands (New York City)

North Brother IslandSouth Brother IslandNorth and South Brother Islands
The quarantining of people often raises questions of civil rights, especially in cases of long confinement or segregation from society, such as that of Mary Mallon (also known as Typhoid Mary), a typhoid fever carrier who was arrested and quarantined in 1907 and later spent the last 24 years and 7 months of her life in medical isolation at Riverside Hospital on North Brother Island.
Its mission eventually expanded to other quarantinable diseases.

Black Death

plagueBlack PlagueGreat Plague
The word quarantine comes from a seventeenth-century Venetian variant of the Italian quaranta giorni, meaning forty days, the period that all ships were required to be isolated before passengers and crew could go ashore during the Black Death plague epidemic.
One development as a result of the Black Death was the establishment of the idea of quarantine in the city-state of Ragusa (modern Dubrovnik, Croatia) in 1377 after continuing outbreaks.

2007 tuberculosis scare

Andrew Speakertraveler with drug resistant tuberculosistuberculosis scare in 2007
In recent years, people suspected of carrying infectious diseases have been quarantined, as in the cases of Andrew Speaker and Kaci Hickox.
Upon Speaker's return to the United States, the CDC placed him under involuntary isolation (similar to quarantine) using a provision of the Public Health Service Act.

Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service

AQISAustralian Quarantine Servicequarantine regulations
The Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service is responsible for border-inspection of any products which are brought into Australia, and assess the potential risks the products might harm Australian environment.
The Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service (AQIS) was the Australian government agency responsible for enforcing Australian quarantine laws, as part of the Department of Agriculture.

Pet passport

controlsequine passportsimport regulations
To reduce the risk of introducing rabies from continental Europe, the United Kingdom used to require that dogs, and most other animals introduced to the country, spend six months in quarantine at an HM Customs and Excise pound; this policy was abolished in 2000 in favour of a scheme generally known as Pet Passports, where animals can avoid quarantine if they have documentation showing they are up to date on their appropriate vaccinations.
The Pet Travel Scheme ("PTS") is a system which allows animals to travel easily between member countries without undergoing quarantine.

Mary Mallon

Typhoid MaryTyphoid Mary" MallonMary "Typhoid Mary" Mallon
The quarantining of people often raises questions of civil rights, especially in cases of long confinement or segregation from society, such as that of Mary Mallon (also known as Typhoid Mary), a typhoid fever carrier who was arrested and quarantined in 1907 and later spent the last 24 years and 7 months of her life in medical isolation at Riverside Hospital on North Brother Island.
After arresting her, public health authorities returned her to quarantine on North Brother Island on March 27, 1915.

Infection

infectious diseaseinfectious diseasesinfections
It is often used in connection to disease and illness, preventing the movement of those who may have been exposed to a communicable disease, but do not have a confirmed medical diagnosis.
Other types of infectious, transmissible, or communicable diseases with more specialized routes of infection, such as vector transmission or sexual transmission, are usually not regarded as "contagious", and often do not require medical isolation (sometimes loosely called quarantine) of victims.

Protective sequestration

isolated themselves
During the 1918 influenza pandemic, some communities instituted protective sequestration (sometimes referred to as "reverse quarantine") to keep the infected from introducing influenza into healthy populations.
The term avoids the use of the word quarantine, which, in public health, refers to the voluntary or enforced detention of a person who, because of actual or possible contact with an infectious agent, may have become infected and therefore be capable of passing it along to others.

Border control

border crossingimmigration policyInternational Zone
Quarantine can be applied to humans, but also to animals of various kinds, and both as part of border control as well as within a country.
Such agencies may oversee various aspects of border control, such as customs, immigration policy, border security, quarantine, and other such aspects.

HM Customs and Excise

Customs and ExciseBoard of Customs and ExciseHer Majesty's Customs and Excise
To reduce the risk of introducing rabies from continental Europe, the United Kingdom used to require that dogs, and most other animals introduced to the country, spend six months in quarantine at an HM Customs and Excise pound; this policy was abolished in 2000 in favour of a scheme generally known as Pet Passports, where animals can avoid quarantine if they have documentation showing they are up to date on their appropriate vaccinations.

Philadelphia Lazaretto

LazarettoLazaretto Quarantine Station
The Philadelphia Lazaretto was the first quarantine hospital in the United States, built in 1799, in Tinicum Township, Delaware County, Pennsylvania.
The Philadelphia Lazaretto was the first quarantine hospital in the United States, built in 1799, in Tinicum Township, Delaware County, Pennsylvania.

List of Acts of the Parliament of Great Britain, 1707–1719

List of Acts of the Parliament of Great Britain, 1707–196 Geo I6. Geo. I
The plague had disappeared from England for more than thirty years before the practice of quarantine against it was definitely established by the Quarantine Act 1710 (9 Ann.) The first act was called for due to fears that the plague might be imported from Poland and the Baltic states.

Ebola virus cases in the United States

Craig SpencerEbola response coordinatorNina Pham
In recent years, people suspected of carrying infectious diseases have been quarantined, as in the cases of Andrew Speaker and Kaci Hickox.
On October 7, Connecticut governor Dannel Malloy signed an order authorizing the mandatory quarantine for 21 days of anyone, even if asymptomatic, who had direct contact with Ebola patients.

Public Health Service Act

Public Health Service Act of 19441944Alcoholic and Narcotic Addict Rehabilitation Amendments of 1968
The 1944 Public Health Service Act “to apprehend, detain, and examine certain infected persons who are peculiarly likely to cause the interstate spread of disease” clearly established the federal government's quarantine authority for the first time.
The act clearly established the federal government's quarantine authority for the first time.

Swinburne Island

New York City Quarantine StationQuarantine Station
There are similar national landmarks such as Swinburne Island and Angel Island.
It was used for quarantine of immigrants.

International maritime signal flags

signal flagsInternational maritime signal flagsignal flag
The plain yellow flag ("Quebec" or Q in international maritime signal flags) probably derives its letter symbol for its initial use in quarantine, but this flag in modern times indicates the opposite—a ship that declares itself free of quarantinable disease, and requests boarding and routine port inspection.

Cholera

Asiatic choleracholera epidemicA cholera epidemic breaks out
Those afflicted with leprosy were historically isolated from society, as were the attempts to check the spread of syphilis in northern Europe after 1492, the advent of yellow fever in Spain at the beginning of the 19th century, and the arrival of Asiatic cholera in 1831.
In the past, vessels flew a yellow quarantine flag if any crew members or passengers were suffering from cholera.

Pest House (Concord, Massachusetts)

Pest House
The Pest House in Concord, Massachusetts was used as early as 1752 to quarantine those suffering from cholera, tuberculosis and smallpox.
The Ephraim Potter House, a historic house and former pest house at 158 Fairhaven Road in Concord, Massachusetts, is also known as the Pest House, a name used in the 18th century to describe a building in which to quarantine those afflicted with communicable diseases such as tuberculosis, cholera, or smallpox.

Postpartum confinement

confinementparticipate in a ritualpost-partum confinement
The Spanish term for quaratine, la cuarantina, refers also to the period of postpartum confinement in which a new mother and her baby are sheltered from the outside world.
In Latin American countries it is called la cuarentena, i.e. "forty days" (the source of the English word "quarantine").

Angel Island (California)

Angel IslandAngel Island, CaliforniaFort McDowell
There are similar national landmarks such as Swinburne Island and Angel Island.
A quarantine station was opened in Ayala Cove (which at the time was known as Hospital Cove) in 1891.

Incubation period

incubationincubation timelatent period
One of the first points to be dealt with in 1897 was to settle the incubation period for this disease, and the period to be adopted for administrative purposes.

American Samoa

America SamoaSamoaAS
American Samoa became one of only places in the world (the others being New Caledonia and Marajó island in Brazil) to have proactively prevented any deaths during the pandemic through the quick response from Governor John Martin Poyer after hearing news reports of the outbreak on the radio and requesting quarantine ships from the U.S. mainland.

Lazaretto

lazaretLazzarettolazarette
The first lazaret was founded by Venice in 1403, on a small island adjoining the city.
A lazaretto or lazaret (from lazzaretto ) is a quarantine station for maritime travellers.