Quebec Conference, 1864

Quebec ConferenceQuebec Conference of 18641864 Quebec ConferenceQuebecQuébec ConferenceConfederation Meetings1864 conference in Quebec City of the "Fathers of Confederationconferenceconference in Quebec Cityconference of 1864
The Quebec Conference was held from October 10 to 24, 1864 to discuss a proposed Canadian confederation.wikipedia
96 Related Articles

Charles Tupper

Sir Charles TupperTupperSir Charles Tupper, 1st Baronet
Nova Scotian delegates featured Adams George Archibald and Charles Tupper.
Tupper also represented Nova Scotia at the other two conferences, the Quebec Conference (1864) and the London Conference of 1866.

George-Étienne Cartier

Sir George-Étienne CartierCartierCartier of Montreal
Macdonald appealed to the Maritime populace as he seemed a more friendly and diplomatic alliance than George Brown, and in terms of Canada East politician, George-Étienne Cartier, Macdonald was an anglophone, and although Cartier was prominent at the discussions at Charlottetown, the Maritime politicians were yet to get used to the influence and power of the francophone politicians.
He attended all three of the conferences convened for this purpose: Charlottetown, Quebec, and London.

John A. Macdonald

Sir John A. MacdonaldJohn Alexander MacdonaldMacdonald
Canada West leader John A. Macdonald requested Governor-General Charles Monck to invite all representatives from the three Maritime provinces and Newfoundland to meet with the candidates who formed the United Canada to Quebec in October 1864.
In October 1864, delegates for confederation met in Quebec City for the Quebec Conference, where the Seventy-Two Resolutions were agreed to—they would form the basis of Canada's government.

Charlottetown Conference

CharlottetownCharlottetown Conference, 1864Confederation Conference
Therefore, the overall goal of the conference was to elaborate on policies surrounding federalism and creating a single state, both of which had been discussed at the Charlottetown Conference around a month earlier.
The conference concluded on Wednesday September 7, but the representatives agreed to meet again the next month in Quebec City (see Quebec Conference).

Quebec Resolutions

Seventy-Two Resolutions72 ResolutionsQuébec Resolutions
These were going to become the "72 Resolutions."
The Quebec Resolutions, also known as the seventy-two resolutions, were a group of statements written at the Quebec Conference of 1864, which laid out the framework for the Canadian Constitution.

George Brown (Canadian politician)

George BrownBrownGeorge Brown, Toronto publisher & politician
One key alliance made in the Charlottetown Conference that would transfer over to the Quebec Conference was made between the Maritime delegates and Macdonald as they saw him as less abrasive than the other Canada West official, George Brown.
During the Quebec Conference, Brown argued strongly in favour of an appointed Senate.

Ambrose Shea

Sir Ambrose SheaAmbrose
The two Newfoundland delegates included Frederick Carter and Ambrose Shea, who were not government members.
He was one of two Newfoundland delegates to the Québec Conference that led to Canadian confederation.

Charles Monck, 4th Viscount Monck

The Viscount MonckViscount MonckCharles Stanley Monck, 4th Viscount Monck
Canada West leader John A. Macdonald requested Governor-General Charles Monck to invite all representatives from the three Maritime provinces and Newfoundland to meet with the candidates who formed the United Canada to Quebec in October 1864.
The Quebec Conference, the Charlottetown Conference, and the London Conference, at which the details of confederation were discussed, all took place during Monck's time as governor.

Thomas D'Arcy McGee

D'Arcy McGeeThomas D’Arcy McGeeD'Arcy McGee, Thomas
The meeting included members from Canada East- George-Étienne Cartier, Étienne-Paschal Taché as well as Thomas D'Arcy McGee.
He retained that office in the "Great Coalition", and was a Canadian delegate to the Charlottetown and Quebec conferences of 1864.

Samuel Leonard Tilley

Sir Samuel Leonard TilleySamuel L. TilleySamuel Tilley
Members in New Brunswick who also featured were John Hamilton Gray and Samuel Leonard Tilley.
He attended each of the Charlottetown, London, and Quebec City Conferences as a supporter of Canadian Confederation.

Frederick Carter

F.B.T. CarterF. B. T. CarterFrederick B. T. Carter
The two Newfoundland delegates included Frederick Carter and Ambrose Shea, who were not government members.
Carter was a supporter of Canadian confederation having been a delegate to the 1864 Quebec conference.

Jean-Charles Chapais

Jean Charles Chapais
Jean-Charles Chapais, (December 2, 1811 – July 17, 1885) was a Canadian Conservative politician, and considered a Father of Canadian Confederation for his participation in the Quebec Conference to determine the form of Canada's government.

Quebec

QuébecProvince of QuebecQC
Representatives from the Maritimes and Canada East (now Quebec) tended to argue for provincial rights, fearing they would lose their cultural identity under a centralized unitary state.
The first Charlottetown Conference took place in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, followed by the Quebec Conference in Quebec City which led to a delegation going to London, England, to put forth a proposal for a national union.

Étienne-Paschal Taché

Sir Étienne-Paschal TachéÉtienne TachéE.P. Taché
The meeting included members from Canada East- George-Étienne Cartier, Étienne-Paschal Taché as well as Thomas D'Arcy McGee.
Avid supporter of the British Crown, Taché expressed ideas of loyalty even before the debates of regarding the creation of Canada's confederation: "in 1848, he delivered his famous idea of French-Canadian loyalty to the British crown: ... 'we will never forget our allegiance till the last cannon which is shot on this continent in defence of Great Britain is fired by the hand of a French-Canadian. This can certainly explain why Taché worked with Sir John A. Macdonald and other significant characters who were Fathers of the Confederation and who shared similar views. Therefore, these alliances led to the Great Coalition of 1864 – 'a government led by Cartier, Brown and Macdonald under the premiership of a bleu elder statesman, Sir Étienne-Paschal Taché' - responsible for the Canadian Confederation. For this matter, Taché presided of over the Quebec City conference of 1864.

Alexander Campbell (Canadian senator)

Alexander CampbellSir Alexander Campbell
He attended the Charlottetown Conference and the Quebec City Conference in 1864, and at Confederation was appointed to the Senate of Canada.

James Cockburn (politician, born 1819)

James CockburnCockburnCockburn, James
Cockburn attended the Quebec Conference of 1864 as a supporter of Confederation.

Peter Mitchell (politician)

Peter Mitchell
While attending the Quebec Conference of 1864, Peter Mitchell was a strong supporter of Canadian Confederation.

Oliver Mowat

Sir Oliver MowatMowat The Honourable '''Sir Oliver Mowat
Mowat was a member of the Great Coalition government of 1864 and was a representative at that year's Quebec Conference, where he helped work out the division of powers between the federal and provincial governments.

Edward Whelan (Canadian politician)

Edward Whelan
Edward Whelan (1824 – December 10, 1867) was one of Prince Edward Island's delegates to the Québec Conference and one of the Fathers of the Canadian Confederation.

Charles Fisher (Canadian politician)

Charles FisherMr. Justice Fisher
Charles Fisher became a Father of Confederation, participating in the Quebec Conference of 1864 and the London Conference of 1866 that drafted the British North America Act.

John Mercer Johnson

John M. JohnsonJ. M. JohnsonJohn M. Johnson, Jr.
He was delegated to the Quebec Conference in 1864 and that of London in 1866.

Joseph Howe

Joe HoweJoseph Howe Drive
By the time he returned to Nova Scotia in November 1864, the Quebec Conference had taken place, and the Quebec Resolutions widely disseminated.

William Steeves

William H. SteevesWilliam Henry SteevesHon. William Henry Steeves House Museum
Steeves was a supporter of Confederation and was one of New Brunswick's delegates to the Charlottetown Conference and the Quebec Conference of 1864.

Edward Palmer (Canadian politician)

Edward Palmer
He is considered one of the Fathers of Canadian Confederation, despite his opposition to Confederation, as he was a delegate to both the Charlottetown and Québec Conferences.