Quebec Sign Language

LSQfcslangue des signes QuébécoiseQuebecQuebec (also known as French Canadian) Sign LanguageQuébec Sign
Quebec Sign Language, known in French as Langue des signes québécoise or Langue des signes du Québec (LSQ), is the predominant sign language of deaf communities used in francophone Canada, primarily in Quebec.wikipedia
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Sign language

deaf sign languagesign languagessigning
Quebec Sign Language, known in French as Langue des signes québécoise or Langue des signes du Québec (LSQ), is the predominant sign language of deaf communities used in francophone Canada, primarily in Quebec.
French Sign Language family. There are a number of sign languages that emerged from French Sign Language (LSF), or are the result of language contact between local community sign languages and LSF. These include: French Sign Language, Italian Sign Language, Quebec Sign Language, American Sign Language, Irish Sign Language, Russian Sign Language, Dutch Sign Language (NGT), Spanish Sign Language, Mexican Sign Language, Brazilian Sign Language (LIBRAS), Catalan Sign Language, Ukrainian Sign Language, Austrian Sign Language (along with its twin Hungarian Sign Language and its offspring Czech Sign Language) and others.

French Sign Language

LSFFrenchdiscouraged between 1880 and 1891
Being a member of the French Sign Language family, it is most closely related to French Sign Language (LSF), being a result of mixing between American Sign Language (ASL) and LSF.
French Sign Language is related and partially ancestral to Dutch Sign Language (NGT), German Sign Language (DGS), Flemish Sign Language (VGT), Belgian-French Sign Language (LSFB), Irish Sign Language (ISL), American Sign Language (ASL), Quebec (also known as French Canadian) Sign Language (LSQ), and Russian Sign Language (RSL).

French Sign Language family

French SignFrench familyFrancosign
Being a member of the French Sign Language family, it is most closely related to French Sign Language (LSF), being a result of mixing between American Sign Language (ASL) and LSF.
Quebec Sign Language (1817)

Signed French

However, alongside LSQ, signed French and Pidgin LSQ French exist, where both mix LSQ and French more heavily to varying degrees.
In France, Signed French uses the signs of French Sign Language; the Belgium system uses the signs of French Belgian Sign Language, and in Canada the signs of Quebec Sign Language.

Canada

🇨🇦CanadianCAN
Due to its historical relation to the francophone culture, Quebec Sign Language (LSQ) is spoken primarily in Quebec, although there are sizeable Francophone communities in New Brunswick, Ontario and Manitoba.

American Sign Language

ASLsign languageAmerican Sign Language (ASL)
Being a member of the French Sign Language family, it is most closely related to French Sign Language (LSF), being a result of mixing between American Sign Language (ASL) and LSF.

Deaf culture

deaf communityDeafdeaf communities
Quebec Sign Language, known in French as Langue des signes québécoise or Langue des signes du Québec (LSQ), is the predominant sign language of deaf communities used in francophone Canada, primarily in Quebec.

Quebec

QCQuébécoisQuébec
Quebec Sign Language, known in French as Langue des signes québécoise or Langue des signes du Québec (LSQ), is the predominant sign language of deaf communities used in francophone Canada, primarily in Quebec.

Ontario

ONProvince of OntarioOntario, Canada
Although named Quebec sign, LSQ can be found within communities in Ontario and New Brunswick as well as certain other regions across Canada.

New Brunswick

NBProvince of New BrunswickNew Brunswick, Canada
Although named Quebec sign, LSQ can be found within communities in Ontario and New Brunswick as well as certain other regions across Canada.

French language

FrenchfrancophoneFrench-language
As LSQ can be found near and within francophone communities, there is a high level of borrowing of words and phrases from French, but it is far from creating a creole language.

Creole language

creolecreolescreole languages
As LSQ can be found near and within francophone communities, there is a high level of borrowing of words and phrases from French, but it is far from creating a creole language.

Language contact

contact languagecontactcontact linguistics
LSQ was developed around 1850 by certain religious communities to help teach children and adolescents in Quebec from a situation of language contact.

Gloss (annotation)

glossglossesglossed
However, due to the glossing of LSQ in French and a lack of curriculum within hearing primary and secondary education, there still exist large misconceptions amongst hearing communities about the nature of LSQ and sign languages as a whole, which negatively impacts policy making on a larger scale.

Audism

Such an approach had varying effects where audism lead to lower literacy rates as well as lower rates of language acquisition seen in children sent to residential schools at an early age.

Montreal

Montreal, QuebecMontréalMontreal, Canada
Around the 1960s, several schools for the Deaf were established in Montreal in response to the failed audistic education: Institution des Sourds de Montréal, Institution des Sourdes-Muettes, Institut des Sourds de Charlesbourg, none of which exist any longer.

Montreal Institute for the Deaf and Mute

Institution des Sourds de Montréal
Around the 1960s, several schools for the Deaf were established in Montreal in response to the failed audistic education: Institution des Sourds de Montréal, Institution des Sourdes-Muettes, Institut des Sourds de Charlesbourg, none of which exist any longer.

MacKay School for the Deaf

However, the MacKay School for the Deaf has existed since 1869 serving the anglophone and ASL-speaking communities in Montreal.

Plains Indian Sign Language

Plains Sign TalkIndian Sign Languagesign language
Ontario has passed legislation making it the only region in Canada that recognizes LSQ in any capacity, noting that "The Government of Ontario shall ensure that [ASL, LSQ and First Nations Sign Language] may be used in the courts, in education and in the Legislative Assembly."

Charter of the French Language

Bill 101language legislationQuebec's language law
There have been calls to modify Quebec's Charter of the French Language to include provisions for LSQ.

Estates-General on the Situation and Future of the French Language in Quebec

Commission of the Estates-General
In Quebec in 2002 following the passing of Bill 104, recommendations presented to Commission of the Estates-General were rejected.

Indigenous peoples of the Americas

Native AmericanNative Americansindigenous
Three recommendations were proposed modifying the Charter such that LSQ is recognized along the same lines as done for the language and culture of North American Aboriginal Peoples and the Inuit of Quebec.

Inuit

InukEskimoEskimos
Three recommendations were proposed modifying the Charter such that LSQ is recognized along the same lines as done for the language and culture of North American Aboriginal Peoples and the Inuit of Quebec.

National Assembly of Quebec

National AssemblyMNALegislative Assembly
Bill 14 was never voted on by the National Assembly due to the minority party being unable to amass enough support from other parties.

Child of deaf adult

CODAchildren of deaf adultschild of a deaf adult
That is not to say that every person with hearing loss signs LSQ, but it also misses the many people who use LSQ daily who are also hearing: Children of Deaf Adults, interpreters, etc.