A report on Question

A journalist raises her hand to ask a question at a press conference.

Utterance which typically functions as a request for information, which is expected to be provided in the form of an answer.

- Question
A journalist raises her hand to ask a question at a press conference.

14 related topics with Alpha

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Interrogative

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An interrogative clause is a clause whose form is typically associated with question-like meanings.

Do-support

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Do-support (or do-insertion), in English grammar, is the use of the auxiliary verb do, including its inflected forms does and did, to form negated clauses and questions as well as other constructions in which subject–auxiliary inversion is required.

Interrogative word

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An interrogative word or question word is a function word used to ask a question, such as what, which, when, where, who, whom, whose, why, whether and how.

Subject–auxiliary inversion

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Frequently occurring type of inversion in English, whereby a finite auxiliary verb – taken here to include finite forms of the copula be – appears to "invert" (change places) with the subject.

Frequently occurring type of inversion in English, whereby a finite auxiliary verb – taken here to include finite forms of the copula be – appears to "invert" (change places) with the subject.

The most frequent use of subject–auxiliary inversion in English is in the formation of questions, although it also has other uses, including the formation of condition clauses, and in the syntax of sentences beginning with negative expressions (negative inversion).

Opening and closing question marks

Question mark

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Punctuation mark that indicates an interrogative clause or phrase in many languages.

Punctuation mark that indicates an interrogative clause or phrase in many languages.

Opening and closing question marks
Mirrored question mark in Arabic and Perso-Arabic

Lynne Truss attributes an early form of the modern question mark in western language to Alcuin of York.

Display and referential questions

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A display question (also called known-information question) is a type of question requiring the other party to demonstrate their knowledge on a subject matter when the questioner already knows the answer.

Complex question

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A complex question, trick question, multiple question, fallacy of presupposition, or plurium interrogationum (Latin, 'of many questions') is a question that has a presupposition that is complex.

Intonation (linguistics)

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Variation in pitch used to indicate the speaker's attitudes and emotions, to highlight or focus an expression, to signal the illocutionary act performed by a sentence, or to regulate the flow of discourse.

Variation in pitch used to indicate the speaker's attitudes and emotions, to highlight or focus an expression, to signal the illocutionary act performed by a sentence, or to regulate the flow of discourse.

is interpreted as a yes-or-no question when it is uttered with a single rising intonation contour, but is interpreted as an alternative question when uttered with a rising contour on "Spanish" and a falling contour on "French".

Echo question

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Question that seeks to confirm or clarify another speaker's utterance , by repeating it back in some form.

Question that seeks to confirm or clarify another speaker's utterance , by repeating it back in some form.

Echo questions have unusual syntactic properties (including a lack of wh-movement), which have made them a challenge to account for in linguistic theories of questions.

Alternative semantics

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Framework in formal semantics and logic.

Framework in formal semantics and logic.

The framework was introduced by Charles Leonard Hamblin in 1973 as a way of extending Montague grammar to provide an analysis for questions.