Question

answerwh-questionquestionswh''-questionsQAinterrogativewh-questionsquestionablyrequest
A question is an utterance which typically functions as a request for information.wikipedia
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Rhetorical question

rhetoricallyrhetorically askingrhetorically asks
Rhetorical questions, for example, are interrogative in form but may not be considered true questions as they are not expected to be answered.
A rhetorical question is a figure of speech in the form of a question that is asked to make a point rather than to elicit an answer.

Loaded question

Fallacy of many questionsWhen did you stop beating your wife?biased
Pre-suppositional or loaded questions, such as "Have you stopped beating your wife?"
A loaded question or complex question fallacy is a question that contains a controversial or unjustified assumption (e.g., a presumption of guilt).

Socratic method

Socraticmaieuticelenchus
Raising a question may guide the questioner along an avenue of research (see Socratic method).
The basic form is a series of questions formulated as tests of logic and fact intended to help a person or group discover their beliefs about some topic, exploring definitions or logoi (singular logos) and seeking to characterize general characteristics shared by various particular instances.

Display question

display questions
These are termed display questions.
A display question is a type of question where the questioner already knows the answer.

Yes–no question

yes-no questionyes/no questionpolar question
Questions that ask whether or not some statement is true are called yes–no questions (or polar questions, or general questions ), since they can in principle be answered by a "yes" or "no" (or similar words or expressions in other languages).
In linguistics, a yes–no question, formally known as a polar question or a general question, is a question whose expected answer is either "yes" or "no".

Interrogative word

interrogative pronouninterrogativeinterrogative pronouns
The other main type of question (other than yes–no questions) is those called wh-questions (or non-polar questions, or special questions ). These use interrogative words (wh-words) such as when, which, who, how, etc. to specify the information that is desired.
An interrogative word or question word is a function word used to ask a question, such as what, when, where, who, whom, why, and how.

Do-support

do''-supportauxiliary ''dodo
However, English allows such inversion only with a particular class of verbs (called auxiliary or special verbs), and thus sometimes requires the addition of an auxiliary do, does or did before inversion can take place ("He sings" → "Does he sing?") – for details see do-support.
Do-support (or do-insertion), in English grammar, is the use of the auxiliary verb do, including its inflected forms does and did, to form negated clauses and questions as well as other constructions in which subject–auxiliary inversion is required.

Interrogative

interrogative sentenceinterrogative moodQuestions
Questions are often conflated with interrogatives, which are the grammatical forms typically used to achieve them.
Interrogative is a term used in grammar to refer to features that form questions.

Question mark

????interrogation point
In languages written in Latin, Cyrillic or certain other scripts, a question mark at the end of a sentence identifies questions in writing.
Lynne Truss attributes an early form of the modern question mark in western language to Alcuin of York.

Wh-movement

wh''-frontingwh-frontingfronted
(In some languages the formation of such questions may involve wh-movement – see the section below for grammatical description.) The name derives from the fact that most of the English interrogative words (with the exception of how) begin with the letters wh.
The special interrogatives, whatever the language, are known within linguistics as wh-words because most interrogative words in the English language start with a wh-; for example, who(m), whose, what, which, etc. Wh-words are used to form questions, and can also occur in relative clauses.

Content clause

indirect questiondeclarative content clausedirect question
As well as direct questions (such as Where are my keys?), there also exist indirect questions (also called interrogative content clauses), such as where my keys are.
Such clauses correspond to direct questions, which are questions actually asked.

Sentence (linguistics)

sentencesentencesdeclarative sentence
Languages may use both syntax and prosody to distinguish interrogative sentences (which pose questions) from declarative sentences (which state propositions).
A sentence can include words grouped meaningfully to express a statement, question, exclamation, request, command or suggestion.

English grammar

Englishgrammarthere
In English, German, French and various other languages, questions are marked by a distinct word order featuring inversion – the subject is placed after the verb rather than before it: "You are cold" becomes "Are you cold?"
Like many other Western European languages, English historically allowed questions to be formed by inverting the positions of verb and subject.

Doubt

self-doubtdubiousself-doubting
Doubt
Question

Illocutionary act

illocutionaryillocutionary forceforce
Questions can thus be understood as a kind of illocutionary act in the field of pragmatics or as special kinds of propositions in frameworks of formal semantics such as alternative semantics or inquisitive semantics.

Pragmatics

pragmaticpragmaticallylinguistic pragmatics
Questions can thus be understood as a kind of illocutionary act in the field of pragmatics or as special kinds of propositions in frameworks of formal semantics such as alternative semantics or inquisitive semantics.

Semantics of logic

formal semanticssemanticslogical semantics
Questions can thus be understood as a kind of illocutionary act in the field of pragmatics or as special kinds of propositions in frameworks of formal semantics such as alternative semantics or inquisitive semantics.

Inquisitive semantics

Questions can thus be understood as a kind of illocutionary act in the field of pragmatics or as special kinds of propositions in frameworks of formal semantics such as alternative semantics or inquisitive semantics.

Grammar

grammaticalgrammaticallyrules of language
Questions are often conflated with interrogatives, which are the grammatical forms typically used to achieve them.

Imperative mood

imperativeimperativesprohibitive
Conversely, non-interrogative grammatical structures may be considered questions as in the case of the imperative sentence "tell me your name".

Quiz

quizzesquiz gamequizzing
Questions may be asked for the purpose of testing someone's knowledge, as in a quiz or examination.

Research

researcherresearchersoriginal research
Raising a question may guide the questioner along an avenue of research (see Socratic method).

Research question

A research question is an interrogative statement that manifests the objective or line of scholarly or scientific inquiry designed to address a specific gap in knowledge.

Leo Tolstoy

TolstoyLev TolstoyTolstoi
Examples include Leo Tolstoy's short story How Much Land Does a Man Need?, the painting And When Did You Last See Your Father?, the movie What About Bob?, and the academic work Who Asked the First Question?

How Much Land Does a Man Need?

Examples include Leo Tolstoy's short story How Much Land Does a Man Need?, the painting And When Did You Last See Your Father?, the movie What About Bob?, and the academic work Who Asked the First Question?