Question

answerwh-questionquestionswh''-questionsQAinterrogativewh-questionsquestionablyrequest
A question is an utterance which typically functions as a request for information.wikipedia
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What About Bob?

What About Bob
Examples include Leo Tolstoy's short story How Much Land Does a Man Need?, the painting And When Did You Last See Your Father?, the movie What About Bob?, and the academic work Who Asked the First Question?

Joseph Jordania

Examples include Leo Tolstoy's short story How Much Land Does a Man Need?, the painting And When Did You Last See Your Father?, the movie What About Bob?, and the academic work Who Asked the First Question?

Closed-ended question

open-ended questionsclosed questionclosed questions
For the purpose of surveys, one type of question asked is the closed-ended (also closed or dichotomous) question, usually requiring a yes/no answer or the choice of an option(s) from a list (see also multiple choice).

Multiple choice

multiple-choicemultiple choice questionmultiple-choice question
For the purpose of surveys, one type of question asked is the closed-ended (also closed or dichotomous) question, usually requiring a yes/no answer or the choice of an option(s) from a list (see also multiple choice).

Open-ended question

open-endedopen questionopen interviews
Open-ended or open questions give the respondent greater freedom to provide information or opinions on a topic.

Job interview

interviewjob interviewsage, gender, and marital status
(The distinction between closed and open questions is applied in a variety of other contexts too, such as job interviewing.) Surveys also often contain qualifying questions (also called filter questions or contingency questions), which serve to determine whether the respondent needs to continue on to answer subsequent questions.

Bloom's taxonomy

Taxonomy of Educational Objectivestaxonomyaffective domain
Some types of questions that may be used in an educational context are listed in Bloom's Taxonomy of educational objectives.

Five Ws

Circumstanceswho, what, when, where, why and how5 W
Knowledge: Who, what, when, where, why, how . . . ? Describe . . . ?

Yes and no

noyesyes" or "no
Questions that ask whether or not some statement is true are called yes–no questions (or polar questions, or general questions ), since they can in principle be answered by a "yes" or "no" (or similar words or expressions in other languages).

Tag question

tag questionsquestion tagtag-question
Tag questions are a grammatical structure in which a declarative statement or an imperative is turned into a question by adding an interrogative fragment (the "tag"), such as right in "You remembered the eggs, right?", or isn't it in "It's cold today, isn't it?"

Dependent clause

subordinate clausesubordinate clausessubordinate
These are used as subordinate clauses in sentences such as "I wonder where my keys are" and "Ask him where my keys are."

Grammatical tense

tensetensesverb tense
Indirect questions may also be subject to the changes of tense and other changes that apply generally to indirect speech.

Indirect speech

indirect discoursereported speechindirect
Indirect questions may also be subject to the changes of tense and other changes that apply generally to indirect speech.

Prosody (linguistics)

prosodyprosodicprosodically
Languages may use both syntax and prosody to distinguish interrogative sentences (which pose questions) from declarative sentences (which state propositions).

Intonation (linguistics)

intonationintonationalintonations
Syntax refers to grammatical changes, such as moving words around or adding question words; prosody refers here to changes in intonation while speaking.

German grammar

GermanAdverbial phrasesarticles
In English, German, French and various other languages, questions are marked by a distinct word order featuring inversion – the subject is placed after the verb rather than before it: "You are cold" becomes "Are you cold?"

French grammar

FrenchgrammarFrench plural marker
In English, German, French and various other languages, questions are marked by a distinct word order featuring inversion – the subject is placed after the verb rather than before it: "You are cold" becomes "Are you cold?"

Word order

free word orderconstituent orderword-order
In English, German, French and various other languages, questions are marked by a distinct word order featuring inversion – the subject is placed after the verb rather than before it: "You are cold" becomes "Are you cold?"

Inversion (linguistics)

inversioninvertedinverting
In English, German, French and various other languages, questions are marked by a distinct word order featuring inversion – the subject is placed after the verb rather than before it: "You are cold" becomes "Are you cold?"

Subject (grammar)

subjectsubjectsgrammatical subject
In English, German, French and various other languages, questions are marked by a distinct word order featuring inversion – the subject is placed after the verb rather than before it: "You are cold" becomes "Are you cold?"

Verb

verbsv.verbal morphology
In English, German, French and various other languages, questions are marked by a distinct word order featuring inversion – the subject is placed after the verb rather than before it: "You are cold" becomes "Are you cold?"

English auxiliaries and contractions

auxiliary verbcontractedauxiliaries
However, English allows such inversion only with a particular class of verbs (called auxiliary or special verbs), and thus sometimes requires the addition of an auxiliary do, does or did before inversion can take place ("He sings" → "Does he sing?") – for details see do-support.

Japanese language

JapaneseJapanese-languageJp
In some languages, yes–no questions are marked by an interrogative particle, such as the Japanese か ka, Mandarin 吗 ma and Polish czy.

Standard Chinese

MandarinChineseMandarin Chinese
In some languages, yes–no questions are marked by an interrogative particle, such as the Japanese か ka, Mandarin 吗 ma and Polish czy.