Quimbanda

Exu
Quimbanda is an Afro-Brazilian religion practiced primarily in the urban city centers of Brazil.wikipedia
56 Related Articles

Umbanda

UmbandistsUmbanda BrancaUmbandist
In the early years of the 21st century, some began to assert, despite historical records to the contrary, that Quimbanda was totally separate from Umbanda.
The opposite side of the Umbanda (white magic), i.e., black magic – the practices that intended to cause evil doings, became known as Quimbanda.

Macumba

Makumba
Quimbanda was originally contained under the religious tradition of Macumba. During the late 19th century and into the mid 20th century, Macumba was a pejorative term for all religions deemed by the white-dominant class as primitive, demonic and superstitious black magic.
Later (in the 20th century), these practices were organized in what is now called Umbanda, Quimbanda and Omoloko.

Elegua

ElegguaEleguáEllegua
Note that they are not the same as the Eshu/ Elegua of Lukumi Elegua/ Santeria; as Quimbanda has evolved as a religion, it has created a category of spirits collectively called Exus, whose name was borrowed from the deity Exu.
Elegua (Yoruba: Èṣù-Ẹlẹ́gbára, also spelled Eleggua; known as Eleguá in Latin America and Spanish-speaking Caribbean islands) is an Orisha, a deity of roads in the religions of Santeria (Santería), Umbanda, Quimbanda, Candomblé and in Palo Mayombe.

Pomba Gira

Pombagira
Another set of deities associated with Quimbanda are not directly derived from the Yoruba religious tradition: Pomba Giras, the female counterparts of Exus.
Pomba Gira is the name of an Afro-Brazilian spirit evoked by practitioners of Umbanda and Quimbanda in Brazil.

Eshu

ExuEsuEsu Elegbara
Note that they are not the same as the Eshu/ Elegua of Lukumi Elegua/ Santeria; as Quimbanda has evolved as a religion, it has created a category of spirits collectively called Exus, whose name was borrowed from the deity Exu.
The name of Eshu vary around the world: in Yorùbáland, Eshu is Èṣù-Elegba or Laolu-Ogiri Oko; Exu de Candomblé in Candomblé; Echú in Santería and Latin America; Legba in Haitian Vodou; Leba in Winti; Exu de Quimbanda in Quimbanda; Lubaniba in Palo Mayombe; and Exu in Latin America.

Ogun

OgounOgumGu
Ogum is the orisha of warfare and metal.

Afro-American religion

Afro-Brazilian religionsAfrican diasporic religionsAfro-Brazilian religion
Quimbanda is an Afro-Brazilian religion practiced primarily in the urban city centers of Brazil.

Brazil

BRABrasilBrazilian
Quimbanda is an Afro-Brazilian religion practiced primarily in the urban city centers of Brazil. The Catholic Church in Brazil was under the direct control of the Portuguese crown so it relied on the state to provide funds, resulting in a very understaffed clergy in Brazil.

Magic (supernatural)

magicsorcerymagical
Quimbanda practices are typically associated with magic, rituals with Exus, and Pombagiras spirits.

Ritual

ritualsreligious ritualritualistic
Quimbanda practices are typically associated with magic, rituals with Exus, and Pombagiras spirits.

Santería

SanteriaLucumiRegla de Ocha
Note that they are not the same as the Eshu/ Elegua of Lukumi Elegua/ Santeria; as Quimbanda has evolved as a religion, it has created a category of spirits collectively called Exus, whose name was borrowed from the deity Exu.

Spirit

spiritsspiritual beingruach
Note that they are not the same as the Eshu/ Elegua of Lukumi Elegua/ Santeria; as Quimbanda has evolved as a religion, it has created a category of spirits collectively called Exus, whose name was borrowed from the deity Exu.

Deity

deitiesgodsgod
Note that they are not the same as the Eshu/ Elegua of Lukumi Elegua/ Santeria; as Quimbanda has evolved as a religion, it has created a category of spirits collectively called Exus, whose name was borrowed from the deity Exu.

Yoruba religion

YorubaYoruba mythologyYorùbá
Another set of deities associated with Quimbanda are not directly derived from the Yoruba religious tradition: Pomba Giras, the female counterparts of Exus.

Orisha

Orisaorixásorixá
Ogum is the orisha of warfare and metal.

Whisky

Animal sacrifice

sacrificesacrificedanimal
Not all Quimbanda practitioners use animal sacrifices, and their use is according to the level of the spirits.

South America

South AmericanSouthSouth-America
Quimbanda originated in South America and developed in the Portuguese Empire.

Portuguese Empire

PortuguesePortugalPortuguese colonies
Quimbanda originated in South America and developed in the Portuguese Empire.

Slavery in Africa

African slave tradeAfrican slavesslave trade
The Atlantic slave trade brought African cultural presence to the Americas.

Rio de Janeiro

Rio de Janeiro, BrazilRioNorth Zone
In the large urban centers such as Rio de Janeiro, where the African-slave population was the most concentrated, the Colonial regime enforced a social control system to suppress the rising population.

Brazi

NegoiestiPopeștiStejaru
The Catholic Church in Brazil was under the direct control of the Portuguese crown so it relied on the state to provide funds, resulting in a very understaffed clergy in Brazil.

Superstition

superstitioussuperstitionsbad luck
During the late 19th century and into the mid 20th century, Macumba was a pejorative term for all religions deemed by the white-dominant class as primitive, demonic and superstitious black magic.

Black magic

dark magicdark artsblack arts
During the late 19th century and into the mid 20th century, Macumba was a pejorative term for all religions deemed by the white-dominant class as primitive, demonic and superstitious black magic.