Rachel

Rakelhis step-motherMotherRachel bint LabanRaquel PaddanSecond wife
Rachel (רָחֵל Rāḥêl, meaning ewe ) was a Biblical figure best known for her infertility.wikipedia
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Rachel's Tomb

Tomb of RachelBethlehemTomb of Rachel the Matriarch
The site revered as her burial place (Rachel's Tomb) is one of the holiest sites in Judaism.
Qever Raḥel, قبر راحيل Qabr Rāḥīl) is the site revered as the burial place of the matriarch Rachel.

Jacob

Israelsons of JacobJacob (Israel)
Rachel was the favorite of Jacob's two wives, and the mother of Joseph and Benjamin, two of the twelve progenitors of the tribes of Israel.
Jacob had twelve sons and at least one daughter, by his two wives, Leah and Rachel, and by their handmaidens Bilhah and Zilpah.

Twelve Tribes of Israel

tribes of Israel12 tribes of Israeltwelve tribes
Rachel was the favorite of Jacob's two wives, and the mother of Joseph and Benjamin, two of the twelve progenitors of the tribes of Israel.
According to the Hebrew Bible, the Twelve Tribes of Israel or Tribes of Israel descended from the 12 sons of the patriarch Jacob (who was later named Israel) and his two wives, Leah and Rachel, and two concubines, Zilpah and Bilhah.

Leah

First wifeLeaLeah bint Laban
Her older sister was Leah, Jacob's first wife. Rachel became jealous of Leah and gave Jacob her maidservant, Bilhah, to be a surrogate mother for her.
She and her younger sister Rachel became the two concurrent wives of Hebrew patriarch Jacob.

Laban (Bible)

Labanhis uncleLabão Paddan
Rachel's father was Laban.
Laban welcomed his nephew as a young man, and set him the stipulation of seven years' labour before he permitted him to marry his daughter Rachel.

Joseph (Genesis)

JosephJoseph in Potiphar's houseBiblical Joseph
Rachel was the favorite of Jacob's two wives, and the mother of Joseph and Benjamin, two of the twelve progenitors of the tribes of Israel.
Joseph, son of Jacob and Rachel, lived in the land of Canaan with ten half-brothers, one full brother, and at least one half-sister.

Dan (son of Jacob)

DanDã Mut
Bilhah gave birth to two sons that Rachel named and raised (Dan and Naphtali).
In the biblical account, Dan's mother is described as Rachel's handmaid, who becomes one of Jacob's wives.

Bilhah

BilaBila Muts
Rachel became jealous of Leah and gave Jacob her maidservant, Bilhah, to be a surrogate mother for her.
describes her as Laban's handmaid, who was given to Rachel to be her handmaid on Rachel's marriage to Jacob.

Benjamin

BenBen HorneBenjamin Loong
Rachel was the favorite of Jacob's two wives, and the mother of Joseph and Benjamin, two of the twelve progenitors of the tribes of Israel. Near Ephrath, Rachel went into a difficult labor with her second son, Benjamin.
Benjamin was the last-born of Jacob's thirteen children (12 sons and 1 daughter), and the second and last son of Rachel in Jewish, Christian and Islamic tradition.

Naphtali

Naftali Mut
Bilhah gave birth to two sons that Rachel named and raised (Dan and Naphtali).
The text of the Torah states that the name of Naphtali may refer to the struggle between Rachel and Leah for the favours of Jacob; Bilhah was the handmaid of Rachel, who had thought herself to be infertile, and had persuaded Jacob to have a child with Bilhah as a proxy for having one with herself.

Ephrath

Ephratah
Near Ephrath, Rachel went into a difficult labor with her second son, Benjamin.
The first mention of Ephrath occurs in Genesis, in reference to the place where Rachel died giving birth to Benjamin and where she was buried on the road from Bethel.

Teraphim

idolsteraphthe household gods
Laban pursued him and accused him of stealing his idols.
According to Genesis 31, Rachel takes the teraphim belonging to her father Laban when her husband Jacob escapes.

Bethlehem

Bethlehem DistrictBayt Laḥmbelleem
Rachel was buried on the road to Efrat, just outside Bethlehem, and not in the ancestral tomb at Machpelah.
It is first mentioned in the Tanakh and the Bible as the place where the matriarch Rachel died and was buried "by the wayside" (Gen.

Tribe of Benjamin

BenjaminBenjamiteBenjamites
. The Rachel's tomb is told to be in the ancient city of Zelzah in the land of the Tribe of Benjamin (First Book of Samuel, chapter 10, v. 2).
The tribe was descended from Benjamin, the youngest son of the patriarch Jacob and his wife Rachel.

Israelites

IsraeliteIsraelchildren of Israel
Mordecai, the hero of the Book of Esther, and Queen Esther herself, were descendants of Rachel through her son Benjamin. The Book of Esther details Mordecai's lineage as "Mordecai the son of Yair, the son of Shimi, the son of Kish, a man of the right (ish yemini)" (Esther 2:5). The designation of ish yemini refers to his membership in the Tribe of Benjamin (ben yamin, son of the right). The rabbis comment that Esther's ability to remain silent in the palace of Ahasuerus, resisting the king's pressure to reveal her ancestry, was inherited from her ancestor Rachel, who remained silent even when Laban brought out Leah to marry Jacob.
According to the religious narrative of the Hebrew Bible, the Israelites' origin is traced back to the Biblical patriarchs and matriarchs Abraham and his wife Sarah, through their son Isaac and his wife Rebecca, and their son Jacob who was later called Israel, whence they derive their name, with his wives Leah and Rachel and the handmaids Zilpa and Bilhah.

Zilpah

veZilpa Mayan
Leah responds by offering her handmaid Zilpah to Jacob, and names and raises the two sons (Gad and Asher) that Zilpah bears.
According to the early rabbinical commentary Pirke De-Rabbi Eliezer, Zilpah and Bilhah, the handmaids of Leah and Rachel, respectively, were actually younger daughters of Laban.

Cave of the Patriarchs

cave of MachpelahCave of MachpelaIbrahimi Mosque
Rachel was buried on the road to Efrat, just outside Bethlehem, and not in the ancestral tomb at Machpelah.
The only matriarch missing is Jacob's other wife, Rachel, described in Genesis as having been buried near Bethlehem.

Ephraim

Ephraimitesame namethe Israelite patriarch of that name
After the tribes of Ephraim and Benjamin were exiled by the Assyrians, Rachel was remembered as the classic mother who mourns and intercedes for her children. Jeremiah 31:15, speaks of 'Rachel weeping for her children' (KJV). This is interpreted in Judaism as Rachel crying for an end to her descendants' sufferings and exiles following the destruction by the Babylonians of the First Temple in ancient Jerusalem. According to the Midrash, Rachel spoke before God: "If I, a mere mortal, was prepared not to humiliate my sister and was willing to take a rival into my home, how could You, the eternal, compassionate God, be jealous of idols, which have no true existence, that were brought into Your home (the Temple in Jerusalem)? Will You cause my children to be exiled on this account?" God accepted her plea and promised that, eventually, the exile would end and the Jews would return to their land.
In the biblical account, Joseph's other son is Manasseh, and Joseph himself is one of the two children of Rachel and Jacob, the other being Benjamin.

Ordo Rachelis

Interfectio Puerorum
In the second chapter of the Gospel of Matthew (part of the New Testament), this reference from Jeremiah is interpreted as a prediction of the Massacre of the Innocents by Herod the Great in his attempt to kill the young Jesus. The Jeremaic prophecy is the inspiration behind the medieval dramatic cycle Ordo Rachelis, concerned with the infancy of Jesus.
The prophecy, which Matthew believed to be fulfilled when Herod the Great ordered the slaughter of all boys under two in Bethlehem, looks backwards to Rachel, the matriarch of the Hebrews, and towards her lamentation over the death of her children, the Hebrew children, in the massacre.

Joseph in Islam

JosephYusufYūsuf
Despite not being named in the Quran, Rachel (رَاحِـيْـل, Rāḥīl) is honored in Islam as the wife of Jacob and mother of Joseph, who are frequently mentioned by name in the Qur'an as Ya‘qūb and Yūsuf, respectively.
His brother Benjamin was equally pleasant and both were from the same mother, Rachel.

Jacob in Islam

JacobYaqubYaʿqūb
Despite not being named in the Quran, Rachel (رَاحِـيْـل, Rāḥīl) is honored in Islam as the wife of Jacob and mother of Joseph, who are frequently mentioned by name in the Qur'an as Ya‘qūb and Yūsuf, respectively.

Sheep

ramlambdomestic sheep
Rachel (רָחֵל Rāḥêl, meaning ewe ) was a Biblical figure best known for her infertility.

Bible

biblicalScripturethe Bible
Rachel (רָחֵל Rāḥêl, meaning ewe ) was a Biblical figure best known for her infertility.

Infertility

infertilesterilesterility
Rachel (רָחֵל Rāḥêl, meaning ewe ) was a Biblical figure best known for her infertility.

Judaism

JewishJewsJew
The site revered as her burial place (Rachel's Tomb) is one of the holiest sites in Judaism. After the tribes of Ephraim and Benjamin were exiled by the Assyrians, Rachel was remembered as the classic mother who mourns and intercedes for her children. Jeremiah 31:15, speaks of 'Rachel weeping for her children' (KJV). This is interpreted in Judaism as Rachel crying for an end to her descendants' sufferings and exiles following the destruction by the Babylonians of the First Temple in ancient Jerusalem. According to the Midrash, Rachel spoke before God: "If I, a mere mortal, was prepared not to humiliate my sister and was willing to take a rival into my home, how could You, the eternal, compassionate God, be jealous of idols, which have no true existence, that were brought into Your home (the Temple in Jerusalem)? Will You cause my children to be exiled on this account?" God accepted her plea and promised that, eventually, the exile would end and the Jews would return to their land.