Rachel's Tomb

Tomb of RachelBethlehemTomb of Rachel the Matriarch
Rachel's Tomb (קבר רחל translit. Qever Raḥel, قبر راحيل Qabr Rāḥīl) is the site revered as the burial place of the matriarch Rachel.wikipedia
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Bethlehem

Bethlehem DistrictBayt Laḥmbelleem
The tomb, located at the northern entrance of Bethlehem, is built in the style of a traditional maqam. In the Hebrew version given in Genesis, Rachel and Jacob journey from Shechem to Hebron, a short distance from Ephrath, which is glossed as Bethlehem (35:16-21, 48:7).
Rachel's Tomb, an important Jewish holy site, is located at the northern entrance of Bethlehem.

Maqam (shrine)

maqamMukamshrine
The tomb, located at the northern entrance of Bethlehem, is built in the style of a traditional maqam.
These are namely the famous Rachel's Tomb in Bethlehem (though the burial place of matriarch Rachel was worshipped even before), the splendid mausoleum of Abu Hurairah in Yavne and the maqam of sheikh Abu ‘Atabi in Al-Manshiyya, Acre.

Ephrath

Ephratah
In the Hebrew version given in Genesis, Rachel and Jacob journey from Shechem to Hebron, a short distance from Ephrath, which is glossed as Bethlehem (35:16-21, 48:7).
A very old tradition is that Ephrath refers to Bethlehem, and thus that she died on the way there, reflected by the ancient Tomb of Rachel at the city's entrance.

Jacob

Israelsons of JacobJacob (Israel)
In the Hebrew version given in Genesis, Rachel and Jacob journey from Shechem to Hebron, a short distance from Ephrath, which is glossed as Bethlehem (35:16-21, 48:7).
Rachel's Tomb, just outside Bethlehem, remains a popular site for pilgrimages and prayers to this day.

Status quo of Holy Land sites

Status Quocame to an agreementholy sites
Following a 1929 British memorandum, in 1949 the UN ruled that the Status Quo, an arrangement approved by the 1878 Treaty of Berlin concerning rights, privileges and practices in certain Holy Places, applies to the site.
2) Rachel's Tomb, Bethlehem

Moses Montefiore

Sir Moses MontefioreMontefioreSir Moses Haim Montefiore
When Sir Moses Montefiore renovated the site in 1841 and obtained the keys for the Jewish community, he also added an antechamber, including a mihrab for Muslim prayer, to ease Muslim fears. The tomb of Sir Moses Montefiore, adjacent to the Montefiore synagogue in Ramsgate, England, is a replica of Rachel's Tomb.
On the grounds he built the elegant, Regency architecture Montefiore Synagogue and mausoleum modeled on Rachel's Tomb outside Bethlehem (whose refurbishment and upkeep he had paid for).

Six-Day War

1967 war19671967 Arab-Israeli War
Following the Six-Day War in 1967, Israel occupied of the West Bank, which included the tomb.
Other Jewish holy sites, such as Rachel's Tomb in Bethlehem and Joseph's Tomb in Nablus, also became accessible.

Aida Camp

Aida Refugee CampAida
After an attack on Joseph's Tomb and its subsequent takeover by Arabs, hundreds of residents of Bethlehem and the Aida refugee camp, led by the Palestinian Authority-appointed governor of Bethlehem, Muhammad Rashad al-Jabari, attacked Rachel's Tomb.
Aida camp is adjacent to Rachel's Tomb, walled off from Jerusalem by the Israeli West Bank barrier and contiguous to the Israeli settlement of Gilo.

Montefiore Synagogue

The tomb of Sir Moses Montefiore, adjacent to the Montefiore synagogue in Ramsgate, England, is a replica of Rachel's Tomb.
It is a replica of Rachel's Tomb on the road from Jerusalem to Bethlehem.

Nava Applebaum

Nava
The Torah Ark in Rachel's Tomb is covered with a curtain (Hebrew: parokhet) made from the wedding gown of Nava Applebaum, a young Israeli woman who was killed by a Palestinian terrorist in a suicide bombing at Café Hillel in Jerusalem in 2003, on the eve of her wedding.
The top of Applebaum's unworn wedding gown was made into a covering for the Torah ark at Rachel's Tomb.

List of National Heritage Sites of Israel

national heritage site protection and rehabilitation planNational Heritage Sites
*List of National Heritage Sites of Israel
Rachel's Tomb, Bethlehem: Traditional burial place of the Hebrew matriarch Rachel.

Jews

JewishJewJewish people
The tomb has been considered holy to Jews, and Christians for 2000 years, and to Muslims for 1400 years. According to the 1947 United Nations Partition Plan for Palestine, the tomb was to be part of the internationally administered zone of Jerusalem, but the area was occupied by The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, which prohibited Jews from entering the area.

Ottoman Empire

OttomanOttomansTurks
The earliest extra-biblical records describing this tomb as Rachel's burial place date to the first decades of the 4th century CE. The structure in its current form dates from the Ottoman period, and is situated in a Christian and Muslim cemetery dating from at least the Mamluk period.

Antechamber

anteroomante-roomante-chamber
When Sir Moses Montefiore renovated the site in 1841 and obtained the keys for the Jewish community, he also added an antechamber, including a mihrab for Muslim prayer, to ease Muslim fears.

Mihrab

mehrabprayer nichemihrabs
When Sir Moses Montefiore renovated the site in 1841 and obtained the keys for the Jewish community, he also added an antechamber, including a mihrab for Muslim prayer, to ease Muslim fears.

Corpus separatum (Jerusalem)

corpus separatuminternationalization of Jerusaleminternationalized Jerusalem
According to the 1947 United Nations Partition Plan for Palestine, the tomb was to be part of the internationally administered zone of Jerusalem, but the area was occupied by The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, which prohibited Jews from entering the area.

West Bank

the West BankPalestineArea C
Following the Six-Day War in 1967, Israel occupied of the West Bank, which included the tomb. Following the Israeli occupation of the West Bank in 1967, though not initially falling within Area C, the site has come under the control of the Israeli Ministry of Religious Affairs.

Ministry of Religious Services

Minister of Religious AffairsMinister of ReligionsMinister of Religious Services
Following the Israeli occupation of the West Bank in 1967, though not initially falling within Area C, the site has come under the control of the Israeli Ministry of Religious Affairs.

Early Christianity

early Christianearly churchearly Christians
According to Frederick Strickert, the first historically recorded pilgrimages to the site were by early Christians, and Christian witnesses wrote of the devotion shown to the shrine "by local Muslims and then later also by Jews"; throughout history, the site was rarely considered a shrine exclusive to one religion and is described as being "held in esteem equally by Jews, Muslims, and Christians".

Treaty of Berlin (1878)

Treaty of BerlinBerlin Treaty1878 Treaty of Berlin
Following a 1929 British memorandum, in 1949 the UN ruled that the Status Quo, an arrangement approved by the 1878 Treaty of Berlin concerning rights, privileges and practices in certain Holy Places, applies to the site.

Israeli West Bank barrier

separation barrierWest Bank barrierseparation wall
In 2005, following Israeli approval on 11 September 2002, the Israeli West Bank barrier was built around the tomb, effectively annexing it to Jerusalem.

Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights

United Nations High Commissioner for Human RightsUN High Commissioner for Human RightsOHCHR
A 2005 report from OHCHR Special Rapporteur John Dugard noted that: "Although Rachel’s Tomb is a site holy to Jews, Muslims and Christians, it has effectively been closed to Muslims and Christians."

Hebrew Bible

biblicalBibleHebrew
The burial place of the matriarch Rachel as mentioned in Jewish Tanakh, Christian Old Testament and in Muslim literature is contested between this site and several others to the north. Biblical scholarship identifies two different traditions in the Hebrew Bible concerning the site of Rachel's burial, respectively a northern version, locating it north of Jerusalem near Ramah, modern Al-Ram, and a southern narrative locating it close to Bethlehem.

Ramah in Benjamin

RamahRamah, Ha-Ramah
Biblical scholarship identifies two different traditions in the Hebrew Bible concerning the site of Rachel's burial, respectively a northern version, locating it north of Jerusalem near Ramah, modern Al-Ram, and a southern narrative locating it close to Bethlehem.

Book of Genesis

GenesisGen.Gen
In the Hebrew version given in Genesis, Rachel and Jacob journey from Shechem to Hebron, a short distance from Ephrath, which is glossed as Bethlehem (35:16-21, 48:7).