RadioShack

Radio ShackTandy/Radio ShackTandyRadioRadio Shack’sRadioShack / RealisticRadioShack Corp.RadioShack CorporationRealisticTandy/RadioShack
RadioShack, formerly RadioShack Corporation, is the trade name of an American retailer founded in 1921.wikipedia
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TRS-80

TRS-80 Model ITandy TRS-80Tandy TRS-80 Model I
In 1977, two years after the MITS Altair 8800, Radio Shack introduced the TRS-80, one of the first mass-produced personal computers.
The TRS-80 Micro Computer System (TRS-80, later renamed the Model I to distinguish it from successors) is a desktop microcomputer launched in 1977 and sold by Tandy Corporation through their Radio Shack stores.

TRS-80 Color Computer

Tandy Color Computer 3Color ComputerTRS-80 CoCo
This was followed by the TRS-80 Color Computer in 1980, designed to attach to a television.
The RadioShack TRS-80 Color Computer (later marketed as the Tandy Color Computer and sometimes nicknamed the CoCo) is a line of home computers based on the Motorola 6809 processor.

Tandy 1000

1000Tandy1000 EX
In the mid-1980s, Radio Shack began a transition from its proprietary 8-bit computers to its proprietary IBM PC compatible Tandy computers, removing the "Radio Shack" name from the product in an attempt to shake off the long-running nicknames "Radio Scrap" and "Trash 80" to make the product appeal to business users.
The Tandy 1000 was the first in a line of IBM PC compatible home computer systems produced by the Tandy Corporation for sale in its Radio Shack and Radio Shack Computer Center chains of stores.

Realistic (brand)

Realistic
In 1954, Radio Shack began selling its own private-label products under the brand name Realist, changing the brand name to Realistic after being sued by Stereo Realist.
Realistic is a brand produced by RadioShack, a division of Tandy Corporation, to market audio and video products for home use.

IBM PC compatible

PCIBM PCPCs
In the mid-1980s, Radio Shack began a transition from its proprietary 8-bit computers to its proprietary IBM PC compatible Tandy computers, removing the "Radio Shack" name from the product in an attempt to shake off the long-running nicknames "Radio Scrap" and "Trash 80" to make the product appeal to business users.
At the same time, many manufacturers such as Tandy/RadioShack, Xerox, Hewlett-Packard, Digital Equipment Corporation, Sanyo, Texas Instruments, Tulip, Wang and Olivetti introduced personal computers that supported MS-DOS, but were not completely software- or hardware-compatible with the IBM PC.

Personal computer

PCPCspersonal computers
In 1977, two years after the MITS Altair 8800, Radio Shack introduced the TRS-80, one of the first mass-produced personal computers.
Three months later (April), the Apple II (usually referred to as the "Apple") was announced with the first units being shipped 10 June 1977, and the TRS-80 from Tandy Corporation / Tandy Radio Shack following in August 1977, which sold over 100,000 units during its lifetime.

Enercell

From the 1960s until the early 1990s, Radio Shack promoted a "battery of the month" club; a free wallet-sized cardboard card offered one free Enercell a month in-store.
Enercell is a battery brand that was sold exclusively by RadioShack at retail stores and online.

Fry's Electronics

FryFrys
Its six profitable stores were sold to Fry's Electronics in 1996; the others were closed.
One of the few stores to challenge Fry's in all dimensions (production selection and store-wide themes) was Incredible Universe, a series of Tandy (Radio Shack) superstores, which were established in 1992 and absorbed into Fry's in 1996.

Family Radio Service

FRSconsumer-grade two-way radiosFRS allocation
In 1996, RadioShack successfully petitioned the US Federal Communications Commission to allocate frequencies for the Family Radio Service, a short-range walkie-talkie system that proved popular.
Initially proposed by RadioShack in 1994 for use by families, FRS has also seen significant adoption by business interests, as an unlicensed, low-cost alternative to the business band.

InterTAN

International TandyInterTAN Canada Ltd.
InterTAN, a former Tandy subsidiary, sold the Tandy UK stores in 1999 and the Australian stores in 2001.
InterTAN was created by Tandy Corporation in 1986 to operate Radio Shack stores in Canada, Europe and Australia.

CueCat

:CueCatsoftware product for CueCat
In 2000, RadioShack was one of multiple backers of the CueCat barcode reader, a marketing failure.
Belo Corporation, parent company of the Dallas Morning News and owner of many TV stations, invested US$37.5 million in Digital Convergence, Radio Shack $30 million, Young & Rubicam $28 million and Coca-Cola $10 million.

Computer City

In June 1991, Tandy closed or restructured its 200 Radio Shack Computer Centers, acquired Computer City, and attempted to shift its emphasis away from components and cables, toward mainstream consumer electronics.
Alan Bush, a Radio Shack executive, was named president of the new company.

Tandy Leather Factory

Tandy LeatherThe Leather Factory
The leather operating assets were sold to The Leather Factory on November 30, 2000; that business remains profitable.
In 1963, Tandy Corporation acquired management control of the Radio Shack Corporation and, after two years, Charles Tandy had turned the company's $4 million loss into a profit.

David Edmondson

On February 20, 2006, CEO David Edmondson admitted to "misstatements" on his curriculum vitae and resigned after the Fort Worth Star-Telegram debunked his claim to degrees in theology and psychology from Heartland Baptist Bible College.
David J. Edmondson (born June 10, 1959) is an American businessman, known for his career at RadioShack and his termination as CEO for falsifying his educational background.

Fort Worth, Texas

Fort WorthFort Worth, TXFt. Worth
RadioShack and the Better Business Bureau of Fort Worth, Texas met on April 23, 2009 to discuss unanswered and unresolved complaints.
The city is stimulated by several university communities: Texas Christian University, Texas Wesleyan, University of North Texas Health Science Center, and Texas A&M University School of Law, and many multinational corporations, including Bell Helicopter, Lockheed Martin, American Airlines, BNSF Railway, Pier 1 Imports, XTO Energy and RadioShack.

Allied Electronics

Allied RadioAllied Radio CorporationAllied Radio's Knight-Kit
Allied Electronics, the firm's industrial component operation, continued as a Tandy division until it was sold to Spartan Manufacturing in 1981.
In 1970, the Tandy Corporation, Radio Shack’s parent company, purchased Allied Radio, the consumer division, along with Allied Electronics, the industrial division.

AST Research

ASTAST ComputerAST Research, Inc.
Tandy sold its computer manufacturing to AST Research in 1993, including the laptop computer Grid Systems Corporation which it had purchased in 1988.
In 1993 Radio Shack sold its computer manufacturing division to AST, and in 1994 they reached a deal to sell AST computers in Radio Shack stores.

Circuit City

Circuit City Stores, Inc.
InterTAN was sold (with its Canadian stores) to rival Circuit City in 2004. The Canadian stores were rebranded under the name The Source by Circuit City.
Circuit City paid approximately US$284 million for InterTAN's 980 stores, which operated in Canada under the trade names RadioShack, Rogers Plus, and Battery Plus.

Amazon Locker

In November 2012, RadioShack introduced Amazon Locker parcel pick-up services at its stores, only to dump the program in September 2013.
Staples and RadioShack joined the program briefly in 2012, only to withdraw the following year.

Sprint Corporation

SprintSprint NextelSprint PCS
A separate report by Bloomberg claimed the company might sell leases to as many as half its stores to Sprint.
In September 1996, Sprint announced a deal with RadioShack, and in 1997, Sprint stores opened at RadioShack to offer communications services and products across the United States.

Citizens band radio

CB radioCBcitizens band
The chain profited from the mass popularity of citizens band radio in the mid-1970s which, at its peak, represented nearly 30% of the chain's revenue.
for RadioShack stores in the mid-1990s.

The Source (retailer)

The SourceThe Source By Circuit CityLa Source
The Canadian stores were rebranded under the name The Source by Circuit City.
The chain goes back over 40 years in Canada, initially as Radio Shack and later as The Source by Circuit City.

Julian C. Day

Julian Day
RadioShack's board of directors appointed Julian C. Day as chairman and chief executive officer on July 7, 2006.
Day was elected chairman and CEO of RadioShack in 2006 and stepped down in 2011.

Downtown Fort Worth

downtownCultural DistrictPanther Island Pavilion
In 2001, RadioShack bought the former Ripley Arnold public housing complex in Downtown Fort Worth for US$20 million.
Radio Shack has its headquarters in Downtown Fort Worth.

Strategic lawsuit against public participation

SLAPPanti-SLAPPstrategic lawsuits against public participation
In an attempt to suppress the news, the company launched a successful strategic lawsuit against public participation against Bradley D. Jones, the webmaster of RadioShackSucks.com and a former RadioShack dealer for 17 years.
In 2004, RadioShack Corporation sued Bradley D. Jones, the webmaster of RadioShackSucks.com and a former RadioShack dealer for 17 years, in an attempt to suppress online discussion of a class action lawsuit in which more than 3,300 current or former RadioShack managers were alleging the company required them to work long hours without overtime pay.