Radio telescope

radio telescopesradiotelescoperadio-telescoperadar telescoperadioradio observatoryradio arrayantennaantennas or radio dishesinterferometer
A radio telescope is a specialized antenna and radio receiver used to receive radio waves from astronomical radio sources in the sky in radio astronomy.wikipedia
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Radio astronomy

radio astronomerradioradioastronomy
A radio telescope is a specialized antenna and radio receiver used to receive radio waves from astronomical radio sources in the sky in radio astronomy.
Radio astronomy is conducted using large radio antennas referred to as radio telescopes, that are either used singularly, or with multiple linked telescopes utilizing the techniques of radio interferometry and aperture synthesis.

Parabolic antenna

dish antennaparabolicparabolic dish antenna
Radio telescopes are typically large parabolic ("dish") antennas similar to those employed in tracking and communicating with satellites and space probes.
They are also used in radio telescopes.

Grote Reber

Reber, Grote
The first purpose-built radio telescope was a 9-meter parabolic dish constructed by radio amateur Grote Reber in his back yard in Wheaton, Illinois in 1937.
His 1937 radio antenna was the second ever to be used for astronomical purposes and the first parabolic reflecting antenna to be used as a radio telescope.

Radio receiver

receiverreceiversRadios
A radio telescope is a specialized antenna and radio receiver used to receive radio waves from astronomical radio sources in the sky in radio astronomy.
Satellite ground station receiver - communication satellite ground stations receive data from communications satellites orbiting the Earth. Deep space ground stations such as those of the NASA Deep Space Network receive the weak signals from distant scientific spacecraft on interplanetary exploration missions. These have large dish antennas around 85 ft (25 m) in diameter, and extremely sensitive radio receivers similar to radio telescopes. The RF front end of the receiver is often cryogenically cooled to −195.79 °C (−320 °F) by liquid nitrogen to reduce radio noise in the circuit.

Observatory

astronomical observatoryobservatoriesastronomical observatories
Radio observatories are preferentially located far from major centers of population to avoid electromagnetic interference (EMI) from radio, television, radar, motor vehicles, and other manmade electronic devices.
Beginning in 1930s, radio telescopes have been built for use in the field of radio astronomy to observe the Universe in the radio portion of the electromagnetic spectrum.

Astronomical radio source

radio sourceradio sourcesradio
A radio telescope is a specialized antenna and radio receiver used to receive radio waves from astronomical radio sources in the sky in radio astronomy.
In 2003 astronomers using the Parkes radio telescope discovered two pulsars orbiting each other, the first such system known.

Angular resolution

spatial resolutionresolutionresolved
The angular resolution of a dish antenna is determined by the ratio of the diameter of the dish to the wavelength of the radio waves being observed.
Angular resolution or spatial resolution describes the ability of any image-forming device such as an optical or radio telescope, a microscope, a camera, or an eye, to distinguish small details of an object, thereby making it a major determinant of image resolution.

Arecibo Observatory

AreciboArecibo radio telescopeArecibo Planetary Radar
The Arecibo Observatory has several receivers that together cover the whole 1–10 GHz range.
The Arecibo Observatory is a radio telescope in the municipality of Arecibo, Puerto Rico, United States.

Galaxy

galaxiesgalacticgalactic nuclei
Since astronomical radio sources such as planets, stars, nebulas and galaxies are very far away, the radio waves coming from them are extremely weak, so radio telescopes require very large antennas to collect enough radio energy to study them, and extremely sensitive receiving equipment.
With improved radio telescopes, hydrogen gas could also be traced in other galaxies.

Five hundred meter Aperture Spherical Telescope

FASTFive-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical TelescopeFive Hundred Meter Aperture Spherical Telescope (FAST)
The world's largest filled-aperture (i.e. full dish) radio telescope is the Five hundred meter Aperture Spherical Telescope (FAST) completed in 2016 by China.
The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST; ), nicknamed Tianyan (天眼, lit. "Sky Eye" or "The Eye of Heaven") is a radio telescope located in the Dawodang depression, a natural basin in Pingtang County, Guizhou Province, southwest China.

Ohio State University Radio Observatory

Big EarBig Ear telescopeThe Big Ear
The "Hydrogen line", also known as the "21 centimeter line": 1420.40575177 MHz, used by many radio telescopes including The Big Ear in its discovery of the Wow! signal
The Ohio State University Radio Observatory was a Kraus-type radio telescope located on the grounds of the Perkins Observatory at Ohio Wesleyan University from 1963 to 1998.

Green Bank Telescope

Green BankGreen Bank ObservatoryGreen Bank Radio Telescope
The largest fully steerable dish radio telescope is the 100 meter Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia, United States, constructed in 2000.
The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in Green Bank, West Virginia, US is the world's largest fully steerable radio telescope.

RATAN-600

The largest individual radio telescope of any kind is the RATAN-600 located near Nizhny Arkhyz, Russia, which consists of a 576-meter circle of rectangular radio reflectors, each of which can be pointed towards a central conical receiver.
The RATAN-600 (РАТАН-600 – радиоастрономический телескоп Академии наук - 600, an acronym for the "Academy of Sciences Radio Telescope - 600") is a radio telescope in Zelenchukskaya, Russia.

Water hole (radio)

water holeWaterhole
The Waterhole: 1,420 to 1,666 MHz
It is a popular observing frequency used by radio telescopes in radio astronomy.

Karl Guthe Jansky

Karl JanskyKarl G. JanskyJansky
Radio waves from space were first detected by engineer Karl Guthe Jansky in 1932 at Bell Telephone Laboratories in Holmdel, New Jersey using an antenna built to study noise in radio receivers.
Two men who learned of Jansky's 1933 discovery were of great influence on the later development of the new study of radio astronomy: one was Grote Reber, a radio engineer who singlehandedly built a radio telescope in his Illinois back yard in 1937 and did the first systematic survey of astronomical radio waves.

Lovell Telescope

Mark Ifirst of theseLovell
The third-largest fully steerable radio telescope is the 76-meter Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory in Cheshire, England, completed in 1957.
The Lovell Telescope is a radio telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory, near Goostrey, Cheshire in the north-west of England.

Effelsberg 100-m Radio Telescope

Effelsberg TelescopeEffelsbergEffelsberg radio telescope
The largest fully steerable radio telescope in Europe is the Effelsberg 100-m Radio Telescope near Bonn, Germany, operated by the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, which also was the world's largest fully steerable telescope for 30 years until the Green Bank antenna was constructed.
The Effelsberg 100-m Radio Telescope is a radio telescope in the Ahr Hills (part of the Eifel) in Bad Münstereifel, Germany.

Jodrell Bank Observatory

Jodrell BankJodrell Bank Discovery CentreJodrell Bank Observatory (JBO)
The third-largest fully steerable radio telescope is the 76-meter Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory in Cheshire, England, completed in 1957.
The Jodrell Bank Observatory (originally the Jodrell Bank Experimental Station and from 1966 to 1999, the Nuffield Radio Astronomy Laboratories; ) hosts a number of radio telescopes, and is part of the Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics at the University of Manchester.

Radio noise

staticnoiseradio static
Jansky was assigned the job of identifying sources of static that might interfere with radio telephone service.
In the most sensitive receivers at these frequencies, radio telescopes and satellite communication antennas, thermal noise is reduced by cooling the RF front end of the receiver to cryogenic temperatures.

RT-70

70-meter antennas
The fourth-largest fully steerable radio telescopes are six 70-meter dishes: three Russian RT-70, and three in the NASA Deep Space Network.
There are three radio telescopes designated RT-70, all in countries that were once part of the former Soviet Union, all with similar specifications: 70m dishes and an operating range of 5–300 GHz.

Qitai Radio Telescope

, the planned Qitai Radio Telescope will be the world's largest fully steerable single-dish radio telescope with a diameter of 110 m.
The Xingjiang Qitai 110m Radio Telescope (QTT) is a planned radio telescope to be built in Qitai County in Xinjiang, China.

Spektr-R

RadioAstronSpektr-R (RadioAstron)
The last one was sent by Russia in 2011 called Spektr-R.
Spektr-R (or RadioAstron) is a Russian scientific satellite with a 10 m radio telescope on board.

United States National Radio Quiet Zone

National Radio Quiet Zonean area of limited radar coverage
Every frequency in the United States National Radio Quiet Zone
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) created the Quiet Zone in 1958 to protect the radio telescopes at Green Bank and Sugar Grove from harmful interference.

Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope

Molonglo ObservatoryMOSTSKA Molonglo Prototype
Astronomical radio interferometers usually consist either of arrays of parabolic dishes (e.g., the One-Mile Telescope), arrays of one-dimensional antennas (e.g., the Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope) or two-dimensional arrays of omnidirectional dipoles (e.g., Tony Hewish's Pulsar Array).
The Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope (MOST) is a radio telescope operating at 843 MHz.

HALCA

VSOPHighly Advanced Laboratory for Communications and Astronomy (HALCA, VSOP or MUSES-B)MUSES-B
In 1997, Japan sent the second, HALCA.
HALCA (Highly Advanced Laboratory for Communications and Astronomy), also known for its project name VSOP (VLBI Space Observatory Programme), or the code name MUSES-B (for the second of the Mu Space Engineering Spacecraft series), is a Japanese 8 meter diameter radio telescope satellite which was used for Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI).