Radiocontrast agent

radiocontrastcontrastcontrast agentcontrast agentscontrast dyecontrast induced nephropathycontrast mediumintravenous contrastX-ray contrastbarium
Radiocontrast agents are substances used to enhance the visibility of internal structures in X-ray-based imaging techniques such as computed tomography (contrast CT), projectional radiography, and fluoroscopy.wikipedia
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Contrast CT

bolus trackingcontrastbolus
Radiocontrast agents are substances used to enhance the visibility of internal structures in X-ray-based imaging techniques such as computed tomography (contrast CT), projectional radiography, and fluoroscopy.
Contrast CT is X-ray computed tomography (CT) using radiocontrast.

Projectional radiography

X-rayplain X-rayX-rays
Radiocontrast agents are substances used to enhance the visibility of internal structures in X-ray-based imaging techniques such as computed tomography (contrast CT), projectional radiography, and fluoroscopy.
Plain radiography can also refer to radiography without a radiocontrast agent or radiography that generates single static images, as contrasted to fluoroscopy, which are technically also projectional.

Iodinated contrast

iodinatediodinated contrast agentIodinated contrast medium
Iodinated contrast contains iodine.
Iodinated contrast is a form of intravenous radiocontrast agent (radiographic dye) containing iodine, which enhances the visibility of vascular structures and organs during radiographic procedures.

CT scan

computed tomographyCTcomputerized tomography
Radiocontrast agents are substances used to enhance the visibility of internal structures in X-ray-based imaging techniques such as computed tomography (contrast CT), projectional radiography, and fluoroscopy.
Coronary CT angiography (CTA): the use of CT to assess the coronary arteries of the heart. The subject receives an intravenous injection of radiocontrast and then the heart is scanned using a high speed CT scanner, allowing radiologists to assess the extent of occlusion in the coronary arteries, usually in order to diagnose coronary artery disease.

Iodine

II 2 iodinated
Iodinated contrast contains iodine.
Due to its high atomic number and ease of attachment to organic compounds, it has also found favour as a non-toxic radiocontrast material.

Iohexol

Organic iodine molecules used for contrast include iohexol, iodixanol and ioversol.
Iohexol, sold under the trade names Omnipaque among others, is a contrast agent used during X-rays.

Angiography

angiogramarteriographyangiographic
Angiography (arterial investigations)
This is traditionally done by injecting a radio-opaque contrast agent into the blood vessel and imaging using X-ray based techniques such as fluoroscopy.

X-ray

x-rayssoft x-rayx rays
Radiocontrast agents are substances used to enhance the visibility of internal structures in X-ray-based imaging techniques such as computed tomography (contrast CT), projectional radiography, and fluoroscopy.
A second image is then taken of the same region after an iodinated contrast agent has been injected into the blood vessels within this area.

Intravenous pyelogram

urographypyelographyintravenous pyelography
IVU (intravenous urography)
Unlike a kidneys, ureters, and bladder x-ray (KUB), which is a plain (that is, noncontrast) radiograph, an IVP uses contrast to highlight the urinary tract.

MRI contrast agent

gadolinium-based MRI contrast agentcontrast agentsenhanced
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) functions through different principles and thus utilizes different contrast agents.
Gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents have not proved safer than the iodinated hydrophilic radiocontrast agents used in X-ray radiography or computed tomography as they are nephrotoxic and neurotoxic.

Voiding cystourethrography

voiding cystourethrogrammicturating cystourethrographyvoiding cystogram
VCUG (voiding cystourethrography)
The technique consists of catheterizing the person in order to fill the bladder with a radiocontrast agent, typically diatrizoic acid.

Fluoroscopy

fluoroscopefluoroscopiccineradiography
Radiocontrast agents are substances used to enhance the visibility of internal structures in X-ray-based imaging techniques such as computed tomography (contrast CT), projectional radiography, and fluoroscopy.
A number of substances have been used as radiocontrast agents, including silver, bismuth, caesium, thorium, tin, zirconium, tantalum, tungsten and lanthanide compounds.

Magnetic resonance imaging

MRImagnetic resonance imaging (MRI)magnetic resonance
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) functions through different principles and thus utilizes different contrast agents.
0.03–0.1%. Of particular interest is the lower incidence of nephrotoxicity, compared with iodinated agents, when given at usual doses—this has made contrast-enhanced MRI scanning an option for patients with renal impairment, who would otherwise not be able to undergo contrast-enhanced CT.

Barium sulfate

BaSO 4 barium sulphatebaryta
Barium sulfate is mainly used in the imaging of the digestive system.
Barium sulfate in suspension is frequently used medically as a radiocontrast agent for X-ray imaging and other diagnostic procedures.

Iodixanol

Organic iodine molecules used for contrast include iohexol, iodixanol and ioversol.
Visipaque is commonly used as a contrast agent during coronary angiography.

Lower gastrointestinal series

barium enemabarium enemasGI series
Barium enema (large bowel investigation) and DCBE (double contrast barium enema)
Radiographs (X-ray pictures) are taken while barium sulfate, a radiocontrast agent, fills the colon via an enema through the rectum.

Hysterosalpingography

hysterosalpingogramuterosalpingography
HSG (hysterosalpingogram)
The test is usually done with radiographic contrast medium (dye) injected into the uterine cavity through the vagina and cervix.

Thorotrast

a colloidal dispersion of thorium-232 dioxide
Thorotrast was a contrast agent based on thorium dioxide, which is radioactive.
Thorotrast is a suspension containing particles of the radioactive compound thorium dioxide, ThO 2, that was used as a radiocontrast agent in medical radiography in the 1930s and 1940s.

Radiopharmaceutical

radiopharmaceuticalsmedicinal radiocompoundsradioactive pharmaceutical
This is different from radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine which emit radiation.
Radiocontrast agent

Iofendylate

pantopaqueiophendylate
One such substance was iofendylate (trade names: Pantopaque, Myodil) which was an iodinated oil-based substance that was commonly used in myelography.
Iofendylate is a molecule that was used as a radiocontrast agent, typically for performing myelography studies.

Carcinogen

carcinogeniccarcinogenscarcinogenicity
While it provided good image enhancement, its use was abandoned in the late 1950s since it turned out to be carcinogenic.
For example, Thorotrast, a (incidentally radioactive) suspension previously used as a contrast medium in x-ray diagnostics, is a potent human carcinogen known because of its retention within various organs and persistent emission of alpha particles.

Myelography

myelogramintrathecal myelographymyelographic
One such substance was iofendylate (trade names: Pantopaque, Myodil) which was an iodinated oil-based substance that was commonly used in myelography.
Historically the procedure involved the injection of a radiocontrast agent into the cervical or lumbar spine, followed by several X-ray projections.

Nephrotoxicity

nephrotoxicnephrotoxinKidney damage
Iodinated contrast may be toxic to the kidneys, especially when given via the arteries prior to studies such as catheter coronary angiography.
Proximal convoluted tubule: Aminoglycoside antibiotics (e.g., gentamicin), amphotericin B, cisplatin, radiocontrast media, immunoglobulins, mannitol

Pneumoencephalography

ventriculographycerebral ventriculographypneumoencephalogram
Before the advent of modern neuroimaging techniques, air or other gases were used as contrast agents employed to displace the cerebrospinal fluid in the brain while performing a pneumoencephalography.
This additional testing was not without risk though, particularly due to the rudimentary catheterization techniques and deleterious radiocontrast agents of the day.

Thorium dioxide

ThO 2 thoriathorium oxide
Thorotrast was a contrast agent based on thorium dioxide, which is radioactive.
Thorium dioxide was the primary ingredient in Thorotrast, a once-common radiocontrast agent used for cerebral angiography, however, it causes a rare form of cancer (hepatic angiosarcoma) many years after administration.