Raga rock

raga-rockragaIndian ragaraga feeluse of Indian instruments in pop music
Raga rock is rock or pop music with a pronounced Indian influence, either in its construction, its timbre, or its use of Indian musical instruments, such as the sitar and tabla.wikipedia
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Rock music

rockrock bandrock musician
Raga rock is rock or pop music with a pronounced Indian influence, either in its construction, its timbre, or its use of Indian musical instruments, such as the sitar and tabla.
By the late 1960s "classic rock" period, a number of distinct rock music subgenres had emerged, including hybrids like blues rock, folk rock, country rock, southern rock, raga rock, and jazz-rock, many of which contributed to the development of psychedelic rock, which was influenced by the countercultural psychedelic and hippie scene.

Ravi Shankar

Pandit Ravi ShankarShankarRavi
A major influence on raga rock was the music of Bengali sitarist Ravi Shankar.
His influence on the latter helped popularize the use of Indian instruments in pop music in the latter half of the 1960s.

The Byrds

ByrdsByrdsyMcGuinn, Clark & Hillman
The Byrds' March 1966 single "Eight Miles High" and its B-side, "Why", were also influential in originating the subgenre.
As the 1960s progressed, the band was influential in originating psychedelic rock and raga rock, with their song "Eight Miles High" and the albums Fifth Dimension (1966), Younger Than Yesterday (1967) and The Notorious Byrd Brothers (1968).

Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown)

Norwegian Woodsong
Writing in 1997, Bellman commented that the Yardbirds and Kinks recordings were often overlooked in discussions of raga rock's origins, as history instead highlighted the Beatles' "Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown)".
Further to several British bands, including the Beatles, using guitars to imitate the drone and other musical textures of the sitar in their recordings, "Norwegian Wood" was influential in the development of raga rock and psychedelic rock during the mid 1960s.

Eight Miles High

1966 hit songhis last Top 40 hit
The Byrds' March 1966 single "Eight Miles High" and its B-side, "Why", were also influential in originating the subgenre.
Musically influenced by Ravi Shankar and John Coltrane, "Eight Miles High", along with its McGuinn and Crosby-penned B-side "Why", was influential in developing the musical styles of psychedelic rock, raga rock, and psychedelic pop.

George Harrison

GeorgeHarrisonCarl Harrison
Issued in December 1965 on the band's Rubber Soul album, the folk-styled "Norwegian Wood" was the first Western pop song to incorporate the sitar, which was played by lead guitarist George Harrison, and the first to feature Indian instrumentation played by a rock musician.
Author Nicholas Schaffner wrote in 1978 that following Harrison's increased association with the sitar after "Norwegian Wood", he became known as "the maharaja of raga-rock".

Why (The Byrds song)

WhyWhy" (The Byrds song)
The Byrds' March 1966 single "Eight Miles High" and its B-side, "Why", were also influential in originating the subgenre.
"Why", along with "Eight Miles High", was influential in developing the musical styles of psychedelic rock and raga rock.

Fifth Dimension (album)

Fifth DimensionFifth Dimension'' (album)I See You
While many listeners assumed that the lead instrument on these and other songs on the Byrds' Fifth Dimension album was a sitar, McGuinn played a Rickenbacker 12-string electric guitar throughout, and had customised his guitar amplifier to achieve the sitar-like sound.
Both songs represented a creative leap forward for the band and were instrumental in developing the musical styles of psychedelic rock and raga rock.

The Kinks

KinksJohn GoslingThe Ray Davies Quartet
Author Andy Miller says that the subgenre's widespread popularity was preceded by the July 1965 release of "See My Friends", a top-ten single in the UK for the Kinks.
Davies had written "See My Friends" with a raga feel after hearing the early morning chants of local fishermen.

Heart Full of Soul

Music researcher William Echard states that "Heart Full of Soul" by the Yardbirds, which was released in June 1965, "is frequently cited as a key text in starting the trend" towards incorporating Indian-inspired elements in rock music.
Music writer Alan diPerna describes Beck's playing as a milestone and helped introduce "the psychedelic subgenre known as 'raga rock'", which became popular during 1966 and 1967.

Music of India

Indian musicIndianmusic
Raga rock is rock or pop music with a pronounced Indian influence, either in its construction, its timbre, or its use of Indian musical instruments, such as the sitar and tabla.
In 1985, a beat-oriented, Raga Rock hybrid called Sitar Power by Ashwin Batish reintroduced sitar in western nations.

Bus Stop (song)

Bus StopBus Stop" (song)
The Hollies' "Bus Stop", released as a single in June, was another example of the style's growing popularity.
With the release of "Bus Stop" as a single in June 1966, the Hollies joined the trend known as raga rock, a subgenre first popularised by the Beatles, the Byrds and the Kinks.

Raga Rock (album)

Raga Rock
Released on the World Pacific record label in June, the Folkswingers' Raga Rock album featured Harihar Rao, a Los Angeles-based sitarist and ethnomusicologist, accompanied by jazz musicians and members of the Wrecking Crew.
The title refers to the raga rock trend in popular music, as artists such as the Beatles, the Byrds, the Rolling Stones and the Yardbirds had all begun incorporating Indian influences into their recent work.

Love You To

Released in August, it included "Love You To", written by Harrison especially for sitar and tabla interplay, and "Tomorrow Never Knows", which featured heavy tambura drone, tape loops and psychedelic instrumentation.
Music critic Richie Unterberger describes the song as the Beatles' "first all-out excursion" in raga rock, a genre that author Nicholas Schaffner says was "launched" by Harrison's use of sitar on "Norwegian Wood".

Revolver (Beatles album)

RevolverBeatles albumRevolver'' (Beatles album)
Along with "Eight Miles High", Echard highlights the Beatles' Revolver album among the "landmark" raga rock music issued in 1966.
Through its individual tracks, Revolver covers a wide range of styles, including acid rock, chamber music, R&B, raga rock, musique concrète, as well as standard contemporary rock and pop.

Tomorrow Never Knows

Tomorrow Never
Released in August, it included "Love You To", written by Harrison especially for sitar and tabla interplay, and "Tomorrow Never Knows", which featured heavy tambura drone, tape loops and psychedelic instrumentation.
Musicologist William Echard describes it as an example of a raga rock song "rubb[ing] shoulders with the classical avant-garde".

Raga

rāgaragasraag
Ragas are specific melodic modes used in the classical music of the Indian subcontinent.

Rubber Soul

already-punning 1965 Beatles album
Issued in December 1965 on the band's Rubber Soul album, the folk-styled "Norwegian Wood" was the first Western pop song to incorporate the sitar, which was played by lead guitarist George Harrison, and the first to feature Indian instrumentation played by a rock musician.
The use of sitar on "Norwegian Wood" launched what Indian classical musician Ravi Shankar described as "the great sitar explosion", as the Indian string instrument became a popular feature in raga rock and for many pop artists seeking to add an exotic quality to their music.

Ananda Shankar (album)

Ananda Shankarhis self-titled albumself-titled 1970 album
Ananda Shankar (a nephew of Ravi Shankar) released his self-titled album in 1970, a raga rock work that blended sitar with Moog synthesizer.
Ananda Shankar followed a series of sitar-based releases by artists hoping to capitalise on the mid-1960s raga rock trend.

Paint It Black

Paint It, Blacksong of the same namesong with the same name
In May 1966, the Rolling Stones issued the raga rock single "Paint It Black", which featured a sitar part played by guitarist Brian Jones and became an international number 1 hit.

Younger Than Yesterday

One of Crosby's final songs with the Byrds, "Mind Gardens", from the 1967 album Younger Than Yesterday, incorporated drone and raga rock ambience, and vocals evoking the khyal tradition in style and ornamentation.
Although "Mind Gardens" is often dismissed by critics and fans for being self-indulgent, Rogan has commented that its raga rock ambiance, symbolic lyrics and attractive backwards guitar effects capture the Byrds at their most creatively ambitious.

The Inner Light (song)

The Inner LightThe Inner Light" (song)The Inner Light.
Further examples of the subgenre in 1968 were the Rolling Stones' "Street Fighting Man", with its use of tambura and shehnai over distorted acoustic rhythm guitars, and Harrison's final Indian-style composition for the Beatles, "The Inner Light", which he recorded in January with Indian classical musicians in Bombay.
Schaffner paired it with "Within You Without You" as raga rock songs that "feature haunting, exquisitely lovely melodies", and as two pieces that could have been among Harrison's "greatest achievements" had they been made with his bandmates' participation.

Within You Without You

Within You, Without Youwithin and without you
By contrast, Harrison adhered to the authentically Indian, single-chord form in "Love You To" and "Within You Without You", released on Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band in June 1967, and both songs were arranged in a Hindustani classical structure, with distinct alap, gat and drut gat sections.

The End (The Doors song)

The EndOedipal section" of "The EndThe End" (The Doors song)
The Doors closed their self-titled 1967 album with "The End", an 11-minute piece in the raga rock style.

Street Fighting Man

Further examples of the subgenre in 1968 were the Rolling Stones' "Street Fighting Man", with its use of tambura and shehnai over distorted acoustic rhythm guitars, and Harrison's final Indian-style composition for the Beatles, "The Inner Light", which he recorded in January with Indian classical musicians in Bombay.