Ragout

ragoût
The term ragout (French ragoût ) refers to a main-dish stew.wikipedia
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Stew

stewedstewingbeef stew
The term ragout (French ragoût ) refers to a main-dish stew.
There are recipes for lamb stews and fish stews in the Roman cookery book Apicius, believed to date from the 4th century AD. Le Viandier, one of the oldest cookbooks in French, written in the early 14th century by the French chef known as Taillevent, has ragouts or stews of various types in it.

Ragù

raguragoutragù sauce
The Italian ragù (the word being borrowed from French) is a sauce such as Ragù Napoletano used typically to dress pasta.
Etymologically speaking, the term comes from the French ragoûts and reached the region of Emilia-Romagna in the late 18th century, perhaps following Napoleon's 1796 invasion and occupation of those northern regions.

Oxtail stew

Oxtail stew
Oxtail ragout is eaten in Italy.

French language

FrenchfrancophoneFrench-language
The term ragout (French ragoût ) refers to a main-dish stew.

Italian language

ItalianitItalian-language
The Italian ragù (the word being borrowed from French) is a sauce such as Ragù Napoletano used typically to dress pasta.

Loanword

loanwordsloan wordborrowed
The Italian ragù (the word being borrowed from French) is a sauce such as Ragù Napoletano used typically to dress pasta.

The Compleat Housewife

The Compleat Housewife or Accomplish'd Gentlewoman's Companion
Two 18th-century English dishes from The Compleat Housewife show some of the varying meats, vegetables, seasonings, garnishes and procedures which can be applied to the ragoût.

Testicles as food

testiclestesticleanimelles
TAKE claret, gravy, sweet-herbs, and savoury spice, toss up in it lamb-stones (i.e. lamb’s testicles), cock's-combs, boiled, blanched, and sliced, with sliced sweet-meats, oysters, mushrooms, truffles, and murrels; thicken these with brown butter; use it when called for.

Truffle

truffleswhite trufflesblack truffle
TAKE claret, gravy, sweet-herbs, and savoury spice, toss up in it lamb-stones (i.e. lamb’s testicles), cock's-combs, boiled, blanched, and sliced, with sliced sweet-meats, oysters, mushrooms, truffles, and murrels; thicken these with brown butter; use it when called for.

Beurre noisette

brown butterbrowned butter
TAKE claret, gravy, sweet-herbs, and savoury spice, toss up in it lamb-stones (i.e. lamb’s testicles), cock's-combs, boiled, blanched, and sliced, with sliced sweet-meats, oysters, mushrooms, truffles, and murrels; thicken these with brown butter; use it when called for.

Pig's ear (food)

Pig's earearpig's ears
To make a Ragoo of Pigs-Ears

Shallot

shallotsAllium cepa'' var. ''aggregatumeschalot
TAKE a quantity of pigs-ears, and boil them in one half wine and the other water; cut them in small pieces, then brown a little butter, and put them in, and a pretty deal of gravy, two anchovies, an eschalot or two, a little mustard, and some slices of lemon, some salt and nutmeg: stew all these together, and shake it up thick.

Nutmeg

macenutmeg and maceNutmeg butter
TAKE a quantity of pigs-ears, and boil them in one half wine and the other water; cut them in small pieces, then brown a little butter, and put them in, and a pretty deal of gravy, two anchovies, an eschalot or two, a little mustard, and some slices of lemon, some salt and nutmeg: stew all these together, and shake it up thick.

Berberis

barberrybarberriescalafate
Garnish the dish with barberries.

Ballad

balladspower balladpop ballad
The 1731 patriotic ballad "The Roast Beef of Old England" by the British writer Henry Fielding comically attributes Britain's traditional military prowess to the eating of roast beef, suggesting that this has been lost since the introduction of ragout from "all-vapouring France".

The Roast Beef of Old England

alleged fondness of the English
The 1731 patriotic ballad "The Roast Beef of Old England" by the British writer Henry Fielding comically attributes Britain's traditional military prowess to the eating of roast beef, suggesting that this has been lost since the introduction of ragout from "all-vapouring France".

Henry Fielding

FieldingHenryFielding, Henry
The 1731 patriotic ballad "The Roast Beef of Old England" by the British writer Henry Fielding comically attributes Britain's traditional military prowess to the eating of roast beef, suggesting that this has been lost since the introduction of ragout from "all-vapouring France".

Roast beef

beefbeef roastbeef roasts
The 1731 patriotic ballad "The Roast Beef of Old England" by the British writer Henry Fielding comically attributes Britain's traditional military prowess to the eating of roast beef, suggesting that this has been lost since the introduction of ragout from "all-vapouring France".

Pride and Prejudice

novel of the same name1813 novel of the same nameCharles Bingley
In the novel Pride and Prejudice, the character Mr. Hurst reacts with disdain when Elizabeth Bennet opts for a "plain dish" instead of a ragout at dinner.

Elizabeth Bennet

Elizabeth DarcyElizabethElisabeta Benedito
In the novel Pride and Prejudice, the character Mr. Hurst reacts with disdain when Elizabeth Bennet opts for a "plain dish" instead of a ragout at dinner.

Cholent

haminhaminadosadafina
chulent

List of snack foods

List of seed-based snacksList of seeds, nuts and fruit for snack