Raid on St Malo

St MaloA landingan aborted assaultled the naval descentsoon turned out to be St Malothe army expedition
The Raid on St Malo took place in June 1758 when an amphibious British naval expedition landed close to the French port of St Malo in Brittany.wikipedia
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Charles Spencer, 3rd Duke of Marlborough

Duke of MarlboroughThe Duke of MarlboroughCharles
The naval forces were under the command of Richard Howe while the army was led by the Duke of Marlborough and Lord Sackville.
He led British forces during the Raid on St Malo in 1758.

Richard Howe, 1st Earl Howe

Lord HoweRichard HoweHowe
The naval forces were under the command of Richard Howe while the army was led by the Duke of Marlborough and Lord Sackville.
Promoted to commodore, with his broad pennant in the third-rate HMS Essex, he took part in the Raid on St Malo in June 1758, the Battle of Saint Cast in September 1758 and the Raid on Cherbourg in August 1758.

Saint-Servan

AlethSaint ServanSt Servan
Instead the British occupied St Servan, a nearby port, and burned 30 privateers and 100 other vessels.
In June 1758, during the Seven Years' War, British troops captured Saint-Servan as part of the Raid on St Malo.

Raid on Rochefort

Rochefort expeditionattack on Rochefortexpedition against Rochefort
In 1757 a large expedition was sent to Rochefort where it captured an offshore island, but failed to make an attack on the town itself before returning home.
The following year Britain launched the second of its descents with an aborted assault on Saint-Malo and the brief occupation of Cherbourg.

Raid on Cherbourg

Cherbourgagainst Cherbourgcapture of Cherbourg
In September of the same year, following a successful descent on Cherbourg a second British force under Thomas Bligh attempted another raid on St Malo.
In June 1758 the British had launched a Raid on St Malo.

Duke Ferdinand of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel

Ferdinand of BrunswickDuke Ferdinand of BrunswickPrince Ferdinand of Brunswick
The French became alarmed when the expedition had set off, believing it was destined for Flanders where it could link-up with the German army under the Duke of Brunswick which had recently crossed the River Rhine.
This caused alarm in France, as it was feared that a naval descent by large number of British reinforcements was intended to be co-ordinated with Ferdinand's advance, although the destination of the descent soon turned out to be St Malo in Brittany rather than the Low Countries.

George Germain, 1st Viscount Sackville

Lord George SackvilleLord George GermainGeorge Germain
The naval forces were under the command of Richard Howe while the army was led by the Duke of Marlborough and Lord Sackville.
In June 1758 Sackville was second in command of a British expedition led by Marlborough which attempted an amphibious Raid on St Malo.

Amphibious warfare

amphibiousamphibious assaultamphibious landing
The Raid on St Malo took place in June 1758 when an amphibious British naval expedition landed close to the French port of St Malo in Brittany.

Kingdom of Great Britain

Great BritainBritishBritain
The Raid on St Malo took place in June 1758 when an amphibious British naval expedition landed close to the French port of St Malo in Brittany.

Saint-Malo

St MaloSaint MaloSt. Malo
The Raid on St Malo took place in June 1758 when an amphibious British naval expedition landed close to the French port of St Malo in Brittany.

Brittany

BretonBritannyBretagne
The Raid on St Malo took place in June 1758 when an amphibious British naval expedition landed close to the French port of St Malo in Brittany.

William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham

William PittWilliam Pitt the ElderPitt
As part of an effort to provide a diversion in support of Britain's German Allies, William Pitt had conceived the idea of a series of naval descents, or amphibious attacks.

Isle of Wight

IOWWightIsland
By early 1758 the British cabinet planned the next raid and began to assemble a force on the Isle of Wight.

Fishing

fishfishermenfished
The selected destination of the expedition was St Malo, a fishing and privateer port on the Brittany coast - which would allow the force to remain in the English Channel so it could return home at short notice in case of a French invasion of Britain.

English Channel

Channelthe Channelcross-channel
The selected destination of the expedition was St Malo, a fishing and privateer port on the Brittany coast - which would allow the force to remain in the English Channel so it could return home at short notice in case of a French invasion of Britain.

Cancale

Cancalle BayCancale BayCancalle
On 1 June the expedition sailed from England, reaching Cancale Bay near St Malo on 5 June.

Causeway

causewayscauswaylandfill
St Malo was situated at the end of a causeway, and it was hoped that the British could cut off the fresh water supply that ran along it.

Fresh water

freshwaterfreshlimnic
St Malo was situated at the end of a causeway, and it was hoped that the British could cut off the fresh water supply that ran along it.

Privateer

privateersprivateeringcorsair
Instead the British occupied St Servan, a nearby port, and burned 30 privateers and 100 other vessels. The selected destination of the expedition was St Malo, a fishing and privateer port on the Brittany coast - which would allow the force to remain in the English Channel so it could return home at short notice in case of a French invasion of Britain.

Dol-de-Bretagne

DolDol de Bretagne
Troops were also sent on a reconnaissance eastwards towards Dol.

Le Havre

Le Havre, FranceHavreHavre de Grace
The possibility of an attack on Le Havre or Caen was considered but not followed through.

Caen

Caen, France Caen in NormandyCaen commune
The possibility of an attack on Le Havre or Caen was considered but not followed through.

Cherbourg-Octeville

CherbourgCherbourg, FranceOcteville
The British then began to focus their attention on Cherbourg in Normandy.

Normandy

NormanNormandy, FranceNormandie
The British then began to focus their attention on Cherbourg in Normandy.

Portsmouth

Portsmouth, EnglandCity of PortsmouthPortsmouth, Hampshire
However, bad weather forced them to abort planned landings on 29 June and 3 July and with his force short of water and other provision Marlborough made the decision to return home, and the expedition sailed for Portsmouth.