Ralph Heathcote

Ralph Heathcote (1721–1795) was an English cleric and writer.wikipedia
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Brookfield Community School, Chesterfield

Chesterfield Grammar SchoolBrookfield Community SchoolChesterfield School
After receiving instruction from his father, and studying at Chesterfield grammar school, he entered Jesus College, Cambridge, and graduated B.A. in 1744, and M.A. in 1748.
Ralph Heathcote, writer

Matthew Maty

Dr Matthew Maty
He moved in June 1753 to London, where he associated with John Jortin, Thomas Birch, Matthew Maty, and others, who met once a week to drink coffee and talk learnedly.
He was at this time member of a literary society which included John Jortin, Wetstein, Ralph Heathcote, De Missy, and Thomas Birch.

Boyle Lectures

Boyle lecturerBoyle LectureBoyle Lectureship
His tracts formed the basis of his dissertation on occasion of his D.D. degree at Cambridge in 1759, and of his Boyle lectures, 1763–5.
1763 - A Discourse upon the Being of God against Atheists, by Ralph Heathcote

Conyers Middleton

When in 1752 he wanted to take a part in the controversy set off by Conyers Middleton on the miraculous powers ascribed to the early Christian Church, he felt a lack of fluency in literary English.
Among those who answered, or defended Sherlock, were: Thomas Ashton; Julius Bate; Anselm Bayly; Zachary Brooke; Thomas Church; Joseph Clarke; William Cooke; William Dodwell; Ralph Heathcote; John Jackson; Laurence Jackson; John Rotheram; Thomas Rutherforth; and Thomas Secker.

Barrow upon Soar

BarrowBarrow-on-SoarBarrow-upon-Soar
He was born on 19 December 1721 at Barrow-upon-Soar, Leicestershire, where his father (died 1765), later vicar of Sileby and rector of Morton, Derbyshire, was then curate.

Leicestershire

LeicesterCounty of LeicesterLEI
He was born on 19 December 1721 at Barrow-upon-Soar, Leicestershire, where his father (died 1765), later vicar of Sileby and rector of Morton, Derbyshire, was then curate.

Sileby

He was born on 19 December 1721 at Barrow-upon-Soar, Leicestershire, where his father (died 1765), later vicar of Sileby and rector of Morton, Derbyshire, was then curate.

Morton, Derbyshire

Morton
He was born on 19 December 1721 at Barrow-upon-Soar, Leicestershire, where his father (died 1765), later vicar of Sileby and rector of Morton, Derbyshire, was then curate.

Jesus College, Cambridge

Jesus CollegeJesusJesus College, Cambridge University
After receiving instruction from his father, and studying at Chesterfield grammar school, he entered Jesus College, Cambridge, and graduated B.A. in 1744, and M.A. in 1748.

St Margaret's Church, Leicester

St Margaret's ChurchSt MargaretSt Margaret's, Leicester
In March 1748, Heathcote became curate of St Margaret's Church, Leicester, and vicar of Barkby in 1749.

Barkby

Barkby Hall
In March 1748, Heathcote became curate of St Margaret's Church, Leicester, and vicar of Barkby in 1749.

William Warburton

Bishop WarburtonWarburtonBishop William Warburton
His publications attracted the notice of William Warburton, who presented Heathcote to the assistant preachership at Lincoln's Inn.

Lincoln's Inn

Honourable Society of Lincoln's InnLincoln’s InnThe Honourable Society of Lincoln's Inn
His publications attracted the notice of William Warburton, who presented Heathcote to the assistant preachership at Lincoln's Inn.

John Jortin

JORTIN, JOHN
He moved in June 1753 to London, where he associated with John Jortin, Thomas Birch, Matthew Maty, and others, who met once a week to drink coffee and talk learnedly.

Thomas Birch

He moved in June 1753 to London, where he associated with John Jortin, Thomas Birch, Matthew Maty, and others, who met once a week to drink coffee and talk learnedly.

Southwell Minster

Southwellcollegiate church of SouthwellCathedral and Collegiate Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary
In the late 1760s Heathcote moved back to the midlands, as a prebendary of Southwell Minster, Nottinghamshire.

Nottinghamshire

NottinghamNottsNottinghamshire County Council
In the late 1760s Heathcote moved back to the midlands, as a prebendary of Southwell Minster, Nottinghamshire.

Early Christianity

early Christianearly churchearly Christians
When in 1752 he wanted to take a part in the controversy set off by Conyers Middleton on the miraculous powers ascribed to the early Christian Church, he felt a lack of fluency in literary English.

Thomas Fothergill

He produced two pamphlets anonymously: Cursory Animadversions on the Controversy in General (1752), and Remarks upon a Charge by Dr. Chapman (1752); and in the following year wrote a reply to Thomas Fothergill's sermon on the uses of commemorating King Charles I's martyrdom.

Henry St John, 1st Viscount Bolingbroke

BolingbrokeHenry St. JohnLord Bolingbroke
He took a part in controversy against Henry St John, 1st Viscount Bolingbroke, publishing in 1755 A Sketch of Lord Bolingbroke's Philosophy,’ and against the Hutchinsonian Thomas Patten on the other.

Horace Walpole

WalpoleHoraceHoratio Walpole
In 1767, Heathcote published an anonymous letter to Horace Walpole on the dispute between David Hume and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, which was attributed to Walpole himself.

David Hume

HumeHumeanHume, David
In 1767, Heathcote published an anonymous letter to Horace Walpole on the dispute between David Hume and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, which was attributed to Walpole himself.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau

RousseauJ.-J. RousseauJean Jacques Rousseau
In 1767, Heathcote published an anonymous letter to Horace Walpole on the dispute between David Hume and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, which was attributed to Walpole himself.

William Murray, 1st Earl of Mansfield

Lord MansfieldWilliam MurrayMansfield
The second and third editions have a long dedication to Lord Mansfield.