Rapid application development

RADrapid developmentrapid prototypingrapid application development (RAD)prototypingR'''apid '''A'''pplication '''D'''evelopmentrapid application development systemRapid Application Development Toolrapid web-application developmentrapidly prototyping
Rapid-application development (RAD), also called rapid-application building (RAB), is both a general term, used to refer to adaptive software development approaches, as well as the name for Terry Barraclough's approach to rapid development.wikipedia
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Software prototyping

prototypingprototypeprototypes
Prototypes are often used in addition to or sometimes even in place of design specifications.
Throwaway or rapid prototyping refers to the creation of a model that will eventually be discarded rather than becoming part of the final delivered software.

Adaptive software development

adaptive
Other approaches to rapid development include the adaptive, agile, spiral, and unified models.
Adaptive software development (ASD) is a software development process that grew out of the work by Jim Highsmith and Sam Bayer on rapid application development (RAD).

Software development process

software development methodologydevelopment cyclesoftware development life cycle
Other methodologies include waterfall, prototyping, iterative and incremental development, spiral development, rapid application development, and extreme programming.

Agile software development

Agileagile developmentAgile Manifesto
Other approaches to rapid development include the adaptive, agile, spiral, and unified models. In addition to Martin's method, Agile methods and the Rational Unified Process are often used for RAD development.
These included: rapid application development (RAD), from 1991; the unified process (UP) and dynamic systems development method (DSDM), both from 1994; Scrum, from 1995; Crystal Clear and extreme programming (XP), both from 1996; and feature-driven development, from 1997.

James Martin (author)

James MartinJames Martin AssociatesMartin
Starting with the ideas of Barry Boehm and others, James Martin developed the rapid application development approach during the 1980s at IBM and finally formalized it by publishing a book in 1991, Rapid Application Development.
He was one of the first to promote fourth-generation programming languages, and was one of the main developers of the Rapid Application Development methodology.

Waterfall model

waterfallwaterfall methodadvanced programming methods
Rapid application development was a response to plan-driven waterfall processes, developed in the 1970s and 1980s, such as the Structured Systems Analysis and Design Method (SSADM).

Low-code development platform

Low-code development platformslow-codeLow-Code Development
LCDPs trace their roots back to fourth-generation programming language and rapid application development tools of the 1990s and early 2000s.

Systems development life cycle

system development life cycleSystems development life-cyclelife cycle

Software development

developmentdevelopedapplication development
Rapid-application development (RAD), also called rapid-application building (RAB), is both a general term, used to refer to adaptive software development approaches, as well as the name for Terry Barraclough's approach to rapid development.

Software

Computer softwareSoftware & Programmingsoftware technology
RAD is especially well suited for (although not limited to) developing software that is driven by user interface requirements.

User interface

UIinterfaceweb interface
RAD is especially well suited for (although not limited to) developing software that is driven by user interface requirements.

Software requirements

requirements
RAD is especially well suited for (although not limited to) developing software that is driven by user interface requirements.

Graphical user interface builder

GUI builderGUI designergraphical user interface tool
Graphical user interface builders are often called rapid application development tools.

Spiral model

spiral developmentspiralBoehm spiral
Other approaches to rapid development include the adaptive, agile, spiral, and unified models. The first such RAD alternative was developed by Barry Boehm and was known as the spiral model.

Unified Process

Unified Process (UP)Inceptionunified
Other approaches to rapid development include the adaptive, agile, spiral, and unified models.

Structured systems analysis and design method

SSADMStructured DesignStructured systems analysis and design methodology
Rapid application development was a response to plan-driven waterfall processes, developed in the 1970s and 1980s, such as the Structured Systems Analysis and Design Method (SSADM).

Barry Boehm

Barry W. BoehmDr. Barry BoehmBoehm
Starting with the ideas of Barry Boehm and others, James Martin developed the rapid application development approach during the 1980s at IBM and finally formalized it by publishing a book in 1991, Rapid Application Development. The first such RAD alternative was developed by Barry Boehm and was known as the spiral model.

IBM

International Business MachinesIBM CorporationInternational Business Machines Corporation
Starting with the ideas of Barry Boehm and others, James Martin developed the rapid application development approach during the 1980s at IBM and finally formalized it by publishing a book in 1991, Rapid Application Development.

Business process re-engineering

business process reengineeringreengineeringefficiency expert
The RAD approach also matured during the period of peak interest in business re-engineering.

Joint application design

Facilitated Application Specification TechniquesJoint Application DevelopmentJoint applications development

Rational Unified Process

RUPIBM Rational Unified ProcessIBM Rational Method Composer
In addition to Martin's method, Agile methods and the Rational Unified Process are often used for RAD development.