Rapid transit track gauge

List of rapid transit systems by track gauge
The vast majority of rapid transit systems use.wikipedia
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Rapid transit

subwaymetrounderground
The vast majority of rapid transit systems use.

List of metro systems

Metro systems by annual passenger ridesthe largest number of rapid transit stations in the worldthe seventh busiest in the world
For references for the figures, see each system's page and List of metro systems.

London Underground

Undergroundtubetube station
Some of the largest and oldest subway systems in the world use standard gauge in agreement with the country wide dominant usage for track gauge, e.g. London Underground (1863), Chicago "L" (1892), Vienna Metro (1898), Paris Métro (1900), Berlin U-Bahn (1902), New York City Subway (1904), Stockholm Metro (1950), Milan Metro (1964), Mexico City Metro (1969), Beijing Subway (1969), Seoul Metropolitan Subway (1974), Shanghai Metro (1993), Guangzhou Metro (1997), Shenzhen Metro (2004).

Chicago "L"

Chicago 'L'L' systemL'
Some of the largest and oldest subway systems in the world use standard gauge in agreement with the country wide dominant usage for track gauge, e.g. London Underground (1863), Chicago "L" (1892), Vienna Metro (1898), Paris Métro (1900), Berlin U-Bahn (1902), New York City Subway (1904), Stockholm Metro (1950), Milan Metro (1964), Mexico City Metro (1969), Beijing Subway (1969), Seoul Metropolitan Subway (1974), Shanghai Metro (1993), Guangzhou Metro (1997), Shenzhen Metro (2004).

Berlin U-Bahn

U-BahnBerlinsubway
Some of the largest and oldest subway systems in the world use standard gauge in agreement with the country wide dominant usage for track gauge, e.g. London Underground (1863), Chicago "L" (1892), Vienna Metro (1898), Paris Métro (1900), Berlin U-Bahn (1902), New York City Subway (1904), Stockholm Metro (1950), Milan Metro (1964), Mexico City Metro (1969), Beijing Subway (1969), Seoul Metropolitan Subway (1974), Shanghai Metro (1993), Guangzhou Metro (1997), Shenzhen Metro (2004).

New York City Subway

subwayNYC SubwayNew York subway
Some of the largest and oldest subway systems in the world use standard gauge in agreement with the country wide dominant usage for track gauge, e.g. London Underground (1863), Chicago "L" (1892), Vienna Metro (1898), Paris Métro (1900), Berlin U-Bahn (1902), New York City Subway (1904), Stockholm Metro (1950), Milan Metro (1964), Mexico City Metro (1969), Beijing Subway (1969), Seoul Metropolitan Subway (1974), Shanghai Metro (1993), Guangzhou Metro (1997), Shenzhen Metro (2004).

Milan Metro

metroMetropolitana di MilanoMilan Metro
Some of the largest and oldest subway systems in the world use standard gauge in agreement with the country wide dominant usage for track gauge, e.g. London Underground (1863), Chicago "L" (1892), Vienna Metro (1898), Paris Métro (1900), Berlin U-Bahn (1902), New York City Subway (1904), Stockholm Metro (1950), Milan Metro (1964), Mexico City Metro (1969), Beijing Subway (1969), Seoul Metropolitan Subway (1974), Shanghai Metro (1993), Guangzhou Metro (1997), Shenzhen Metro (2004).

Mexico City Metro

MetroSTCmetro of Mexico City
Some of the largest and oldest subway systems in the world use standard gauge in agreement with the country wide dominant usage for track gauge, e.g. London Underground (1863), Chicago "L" (1892), Vienna Metro (1898), Paris Métro (1900), Berlin U-Bahn (1902), New York City Subway (1904), Stockholm Metro (1950), Milan Metro (1964), Mexico City Metro (1969), Beijing Subway (1969), Seoul Metropolitan Subway (1974), Shanghai Metro (1993), Guangzhou Metro (1997), Shenzhen Metro (2004). Some systems use rubber tires, with someones adding them to the normal steel wheels (e.g. Paris Metro, Mexico City Metro, Montreal Metro) and some others with only tires (e.g. Lille Metro, Sapporo Municipal Subway).

Beijing Subway

BeijingsubwayBeijing Metro
Some of the largest and oldest subway systems in the world use standard gauge in agreement with the country wide dominant usage for track gauge, e.g. London Underground (1863), Chicago "L" (1892), Vienna Metro (1898), Paris Métro (1900), Berlin U-Bahn (1902), New York City Subway (1904), Stockholm Metro (1950), Milan Metro (1964), Mexico City Metro (1969), Beijing Subway (1969), Seoul Metropolitan Subway (1974), Shanghai Metro (1993), Guangzhou Metro (1997), Shenzhen Metro (2004).

Seoul Metropolitan Subway

Seoul SubwaySeoulSeoul Metro
Some of the largest and oldest subway systems in the world use standard gauge in agreement with the country wide dominant usage for track gauge, e.g. London Underground (1863), Chicago "L" (1892), Vienna Metro (1898), Paris Métro (1900), Berlin U-Bahn (1902), New York City Subway (1904), Stockholm Metro (1950), Milan Metro (1964), Mexico City Metro (1969), Beijing Subway (1969), Seoul Metropolitan Subway (1974), Shanghai Metro (1993), Guangzhou Metro (1997), Shenzhen Metro (2004).

Shanghai Metro

ShanghaiMetroShanghai Subway
Some of the largest and oldest subway systems in the world use standard gauge in agreement with the country wide dominant usage for track gauge, e.g. London Underground (1863), Chicago "L" (1892), Vienna Metro (1898), Paris Métro (1900), Berlin U-Bahn (1902), New York City Subway (1904), Stockholm Metro (1950), Milan Metro (1964), Mexico City Metro (1969), Beijing Subway (1969), Seoul Metropolitan Subway (1974), Shanghai Metro (1993), Guangzhou Metro (1997), Shenzhen Metro (2004).

Guangzhou Metro

Guangzhou Metro CorporationGuangzhouMetro
Some of the largest and oldest subway systems in the world use standard gauge in agreement with the country wide dominant usage for track gauge, e.g. London Underground (1863), Chicago "L" (1892), Vienna Metro (1898), Paris Métro (1900), Berlin U-Bahn (1902), New York City Subway (1904), Stockholm Metro (1950), Milan Metro (1964), Mexico City Metro (1969), Beijing Subway (1969), Seoul Metropolitan Subway (1974), Shanghai Metro (1993), Guangzhou Metro (1997), Shenzhen Metro (2004).

Shenzhen Metro

ShenzhenShenzhen Metro GroupGuangming Line
Some of the largest and oldest subway systems in the world use standard gauge in agreement with the country wide dominant usage for track gauge, e.g. London Underground (1863), Chicago "L" (1892), Vienna Metro (1898), Paris Métro (1900), Berlin U-Bahn (1902), New York City Subway (1904), Stockholm Metro (1950), Milan Metro (1964), Mexico City Metro (1969), Beijing Subway (1969), Seoul Metropolitan Subway (1974), Shanghai Metro (1993), Guangzhou Metro (1997), Shenzhen Metro (2004).

Barcelona Metro

metroBarcelonaMetro de Barcelona
A lot of rapid transit systems in countries where the main lines do not use standard gauges are built in standard gauge, e.g. Barcelona Metro, Santiago Metro, Taipei Metro or many systems in India.

Santiago Metro

Santiago Metro station Line 1Line 5
A lot of rapid transit systems in countries where the main lines do not use standard gauges are built in standard gauge, e.g. Barcelona Metro, Santiago Metro, Taipei Metro or many systems in India.

Taipei Metro

Taipei Rapid Transit SystemTaipei Rapid Transit CorporationMRT
A lot of rapid transit systems in countries where the main lines do not use standard gauges are built in standard gauge, e.g. Barcelona Metro, Santiago Metro, Taipei Metro or many systems in India.

India

IndianRepublic of IndiaIND
A lot of rapid transit systems in countries where the main lines do not use standard gauges are built in standard gauge, e.g. Barcelona Metro, Santiago Metro, Taipei Metro or many systems in India.

Japan

JPNJapaneseJP
There are also systems that use (some systems in Japan and Jakarta MRT), (the standard in former Soviet Union, and (the standard in Brazil) and few others.

Jakarta MRT

Jakarta Mass Rapid TransitNSLMass Rapid Transit
There are also systems that use (some systems in Japan and Jakarta MRT), (the standard in former Soviet Union, and (the standard in Brazil) and few others.

Soviet Union

SovietUSSRSoviets
There are also systems that use (some systems in Japan and Jakarta MRT), (the standard in former Soviet Union, and (the standard in Brazil) and few others.

Brazil

BRABrasilBrazilian
There are also systems that use (some systems in Japan and Jakarta MRT), (the standard in former Soviet Union, and (the standard in Brazil) and few others.

Rubber-tyred metro

rubber-tiredrubber-tyredrubber tired
Some systems use rubber tires, with someones adding them to the normal steel wheels (e.g. Paris Metro, Mexico City Metro, Montreal Metro) and some others with only tires (e.g. Lille Metro, Sapporo Municipal Subway).