Rashtrakuta dynasty

RashtrakutaRashtrakutasRashtrakuta EmpireRashtrakutas of ManyakhetaRastrakutasRastrakutaRashtrakuta kingdomRastrakuta dynastyRashatrakutasRashtrakuta Empire of Manyakheta
Rashtrakuta (IAST: ) was a royal dynasty ruling large parts of the Indian subcontinent between the sixth and 10th centuries.wikipedia
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Maharashtra

MaharastraMaharashtra StateMaharashtra, India
Other ruling Rashtrakuta clans from the same period mentioned in inscriptions were the kings of Achalapur (modern Elichpur in Maharashtra) and the rulers of Kannauj. Architecture reached a milestone in the Dravidian style, the finest example of which is seen in the Kailasanath Temple at Ellora in modern Maharashtra.
Prior to Indian independence, Maharashtra was chronologically ruled by the Satavahana dynasty, Rashtrakuta dynasty, Western Chalukyas, Deccan sultanates, Mughals and Marathas, and the British.

Dantidurga

The Elichpur clan was a feudatory of the Badami Chalukyas, and during the rule of Dantidurga, it overthrew Chalukya Kirtivarman II and went on to build an empire with the Gulbarga region in modern Karnataka as its base.
Dantidurga (735–756 CE), also known as Dantivarman or Dantidurga II was the founder of the Rashtrakuta Empire of Manyakheta.

Chalukya dynasty

ChalukyaChalukyasBadami Chalukyas
The Elichpur clan was a feudatory of the Badami Chalukyas, and during the rule of Dantidurga, it overthrew Chalukya Kirtivarman II and went on to build an empire with the Gulbarga region in modern Karnataka as its base.
In the western Deccan, the rise of the Rashtrakutas in the middle of the 8th century eclipsed the Chalukyas of Badami before being revived by their descendants, the Western Chalukyas, in the late 10th century.

South India

Southern IndiaSouth IndianPeninsular India
This clan came to be known as the Rashtrakutas of Manyakheta, rising to power in South India in 753.
Major dynasties that were established in South India include the Cheras, Cholas, Pandyas, Pallavas, Satavahanas, Chalukyas, Rashtrakutas and Vijayanagara.

Karnataka

Karnataka StateKarnataka, IndiaKarnatka
The Elichpur clan was a feudatory of the Badami Chalukyas, and during the rule of Dantidurga, it overthrew Chalukya Kirtivarman II and went on to build an empire with the Gulbarga region in modern Karnataka as its base. Other important contributions are the Kashivishvanatha temple and the Jain Narayana temple at Pattadakal in modern Karnataka, both of which are UNESCO World Heritage Sites.
These dynasties were followed by imperial Kannada empires such as the Badami Chalukyas, the Rashtrakuta Empire of Manyakheta and the Western Chalukya Empire, which ruled over large parts of the Deccan and had their capitals in what is now Karnataka.

Amoghavarsha

Amoghavarsha INrupatunga Amoghavarsha IAmogavarsha
Amoghavarsha I, the most famous king of this dynasty wrote Kavirajamarga, a landmark literary work in the Kannada language.
Amoghavarsha I (also known as Amoghavarsha Nrupathunga I ) (800–878 CE) was a Rashtrakuta emperor, the greatest ruler of the Rashtrakuta dynasty, and one of the great emperors of India.

Malkheda

ManyakhetaMalkhedJain Bhattaraka Math
This clan came to be known as the Rashtrakutas of Manyakheta, rising to power in South India in 753.
Originally known as Manyakheta (IAST: Mānyakheṭa, "Mannakheḍa" in Prakrit), it was the capital of the Rashtrakuta dynasty during 9th and 10th centuries.

Kirtivarman II

Kirtivarman II Rahappa
The Elichpur clan was a feudatory of the Badami Chalukyas, and during the rule of Dantidurga, it overthrew Chalukya Kirtivarman II and went on to build an empire with the Gulbarga region in modern Karnataka as its base.
His reign was continuously troubled by the growing power of the Rashtrakutas and Pandyas and finally succumbed to them.

Kannauj

KanaujKanyakubjaKannauj Empire
Other ruling Rashtrakuta clans from the same period mentioned in inscriptions were the kings of Achalapur (modern Elichpur in Maharashtra) and the rulers of Kannauj.
Between the 7th and 11th century, Kannauj became the center of the Tripartite struggle, that lasted for more than two centuries between the Pala Empire, Rashtrakuta Empire, and Gurjara-Pratihara Empire.

Gulbarga

KalaburagiKalburgiGulburga
The Elichpur clan was a feudatory of the Badami Chalukyas, and during the rule of Dantidurga, it overthrew Chalukya Kirtivarman II and went on to build an empire with the Gulbarga region in modern Karnataka as its base.
The Rashtrakutas gained control over the region, but the Chalukyas regained their domain within a short period and reigned supreme for over 200 years.

Malwa

MalavaMalwa PlateauMālwa
At the same time the Pala dynasty of Bengal and the Prathihara dynasty of Malwa were gaining force in eastern and northwestern India respectively.
In 786 the region was captured by the Rashtrakuta kings of the Deccan, and was disputed between the Rashtrakutas and the Gurjara Pratihara kings of Kannauj until the early part of the tenth century.

Pala Empire

PalaPala dynastyPalas
At the same time the Pala dynasty of Bengal and the Prathihara dynasty of Malwa were gaining force in eastern and northwestern India respectively.
Pala control of North India was ultimately ephemeral, as they struggled with the Gurjara-Pratiharas and the Rashtrakutas for the control of Kannauj and were defeated.

Kailasa temple, Ellora

Kailash TempleKailasha templeKailasa Temple
Architecture reached a milestone in the Dravidian style, the finest example of which is seen in the Kailasanath Temple at Ellora in modern Maharashtra.
Its construction is generally attributed to the eighth century Rashtrakuta king Krishna I ((r.

Dravidian architecture

Dravidian style of architectureDravidianDravida
Architecture reached a milestone in the Dravidian style, the finest example of which is seen in the Kailasanath Temple at Ellora in modern Maharashtra.
Various kingdoms and empires such as the Cholas, the Chera, the Kakatiyas, the Pandyas, the Pallavas, the Gangas, the Kadambas, the Rashtrakutas, the Chalukyas, the Hoysalas, and Vijayanagara Empire among others have made substantial contribution to the evolution of Dravidian architecture.

Tripartite Struggle

tripartite power struggleImperial KannaujKannauj Triangle
This period, between the eighth and the 10th centuries, saw a tripartite struggle for the resources of the rich Gangetic plains, each of these three empires annexing the seat of power at Kannauj for short periods of time.
The struggle was between the Pratihara Empire, the Pala Empire and the Rashtrakuta Empire.

Dynasty

dynasticroyal housedynasties
Rashtrakuta (IAST: ) was a royal dynasty ruling large parts of the Indian subcontinent between the sixth and 10th centuries.

Kannada people

KannadigaKannadigasKannada
Possibilities include the north western ethnic groups of India, the Kannadiga, Reddi, the Maratha, or the tribes from the Punjab region.

Reddy

ReddiReddysReddies
Possibilities include the north western ethnic groups of India, the Kannadiga, Reddi, the Maratha, or the tribes from the Punjab region.
The origin of the Reddy has been linked to the Rashtrakutas, although opinions vary.

Kannada

Kannada languageCanareseKannada-language
Amoghavarsha I, the most famous king of this dynasty wrote Kavirajamarga, a landmark literary work in the Kannada language. During their rule, Jain mathematicians and scholars contributed important works in Kannada and Sanskrit.
Kannada is attested epigraphically for about one and a half millennia, and literary Old Kannada flourished in the 6th-century Ganga dynasty and during the 9th-century Rashtrakuta Dynasty.

Dhruva Dharavarsha

Dhruva
During the rule of Dhruva Dharavarsha who took control in 780, the kingdom expanded into an empire that encompassed all of the territory between the Kaveri River and Central India.
Dhruva (ruled 780–793 CE) was one of the most notable rulers of the Rashtrakuta Empire.

Govinda III

Emperor Govinda IIIRakatavahu
The ascent of Dhruva Dharavarsha's third son, Govinda III, to the throne heralded an era of success like never before.
Govinda III (793–814 CE) was a famous Rashtrakuta ruler who succeeded his illustrious father Dhruva Dharavarsha.

Krishna I

King Krishna IKrishna I Akalavarsha
Dantidurga's successor Krishna I brought major portions of present-day Karnataka and Konkan under his control.
Krishna I (756–774 CE), an uncle of Dantidurga, took charge of the growing Rashtrakuta Empire by defeating the last Badami Chalukya ruler Kirtivarman II in 757.

Kavirajamarga

Kavirājamārga
Amoghavarsha I, the most famous king of this dynasty wrote Kavirajamarga, a landmark literary work in the Kannada language.
It was inspired by or written in part by the famous Rashtrakuta King Amoghavarsha I, and some historians claim it is based partly on the Sanskrit text Kavyadarsha.

Pattadakal

PattadkalGroup of Monuments at PattadakalGalaganatha Temple
Other important contributions are the Kashivishvanatha temple and the Jain Narayana temple at Pattadakal in modern Karnataka, both of which are UNESCO World Heritage Sites.
After the fall of the Chalukya Empire, the region was annexed by the Rashtrakuta kingdom, who would rule over the region into the 10th century.

Indra III

Indra III recovered the dynasty's fortunes in central India by defeating the Paramara and then invaded the doab region of the Ganges and Jamuna rivers.
Indra III (914–929 CE) was the grandson of Rashtrakuta Krishna II and son of Chedi princess Lakshmi.