Rawlinson Excidium Troie

Rawlinson ''Excidium Troie
The Rawlinson Excidium Troie ("The Destruction of Troy"), discovered among the manuscripts collected by Richard Rawlinson (1690–1755) conserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, is unique in that it contains the only medieval account of the Trojan War that is fully independent of Dictys and Dares, "strikingly different from any other known mediaeval version of the Trojan War", according to its editor, E.wikipedia
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Dictys Cretensis

Dictys of CreteDictysDictys Cretensis Ephemeridos belli Trojani
The Rawlinson Excidium Troie ("The Destruction of Troy"), discovered among the manuscripts collected by Richard Rawlinson (1690–1755) conserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, is unique in that it contains the only medieval account of the Trojan War that is fully independent of Dictys and Dares, "strikingly different from any other known mediaeval version of the Trojan War", according to its editor, E. Bagby Atwood.
For a medieval source on the Trojan War that is uniquely independent of Dictys and Dares, see the "Rawlinson Excidium Troie".

Dares Phrygius

Dares the PhrygianDaresDares of Phrygia
The Rawlinson Excidium Troie ("The Destruction of Troy"), discovered among the manuscripts collected by Richard Rawlinson (1690–1755) conserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, is unique in that it contains the only medieval account of the Trojan War that is fully independent of Dictys and Dares, "strikingly different from any other known mediaeval version of the Trojan War", according to its editor, E. Bagby Atwood.

Konrad von Würzburg

Conrad of Würzburg
That there was a lost Latin source grew clearer in the late nineteenth century, as scholars compared narrative poems like the Middle English The Seege or Batayle of Troy with Konrad von Würzburg's Trojanische Krieg and with versions in Old Norse and in Bulgarian, and found that they shared details in the opening episodes that were not to be found in Dares nor in the famous Roman de Troie of Benoît de Sainte-Maure.

Bulgarian language

BulgarianBulgarian:Modern Bulgarian
That there was a lost Latin source grew clearer in the late nineteenth century, as scholars compared narrative poems like the Middle English The Seege or Batayle of Troy with Konrad von Würzburg's Trojanische Krieg and with versions in Old Norse and in Bulgarian, and found that they shared details in the opening episodes that were not to be found in Dares nor in the famous Roman de Troie of Benoît de Sainte-Maure.

Hecuba

HecabeQueen HecubaHekabe
The themes included the dream of Hecuba and the birth of Paris, his Judgement of the goddesses—with varying degrees of independence in this oft-told material—and his carrying off of Helen, and the youth of Achilles.

Paris (mythology)

ParisParis of TroyAlexander
The themes included the dream of Hecuba and the birth of Paris, his Judgement of the goddesses—with varying degrees of independence in this oft-told material—and his carrying off of Helen, and the youth of Achilles.

Helen of Troy

HelenHelen of SpartaHelena
The themes included the dream of Hecuba and the birth of Paris, his Judgement of the goddesses—with varying degrees of independence in this oft-told material—and his carrying off of Helen, and the youth of Achilles.

Thetis

ThetysPeleussea-nymph
The opening third contains a history of the Trojan War from the marriage of Thetis to the building of the Trojan Horse, set out in a question-and-answer fashion that suggested to Atwood a school text, perhaps prefatory to the study of Virgil.