Ray Charles

I Believe to My SoulRay Charles BandCharlesBrother Ray–Ray Charles' Own StoryDella Bea RobinsonI Believe to My Soul (song)Ray Charles RobinsonRay RobinsonRay Williamsthe blind R&B musician
Ray Charles Robinson (September 23, 1930 – June 10, 2004) was an American singer, songwriter, musician, and composer.wikipedia
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Atlantic Records

AtlanticKap GAtlantic Nashville
Charles pioneered the soul music genre during the 1950s by combining blues, rhythm and blues, and gospel styles into the music he recorded for Atlantic.
Over its first 20 years of operation, Atlantic earned a reputation as one of the most important American labels, specializing in jazz, R&B, and soul by Aretha Franklin, Ray Charles, Wilson Pickett, Sam and Dave, Ruth Brown and Otis Redding.

Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music

Modern Soundscountry and western albumdebut
He contributed to the integration of country music, rhythm and blues, and pop music during the 1960s with his crossover success on ABC Records, notably with his two Modern Sounds albums.
Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music is a studio album by American singer and pianist Ray Charles.

Blues

blues musicthe bluespiano blues
Charles pioneered the soul music genre during the 1950s by combining blues, rhythm and blues, and gospel styles into the music he recorded for Atlantic.
There are also 16-bar blues, such as Ray Charles's instrumental "Sweet 16 Bars" and Herbie Hancock's "Watermelon Man".

ABC Records

ABCABC-ParamountABC-Paramount Records
He contributed to the integration of country music, rhythm and blues, and pop music during the 1960s with his crossover success on ABC Records, notably with his two Modern Sounds albums.
Ray Charles formed Tangerine Records in March 1962 and arranged for ABC-Paramount to distribute Tangerine's records.

Soul music

soulsoulfulsoul pop
Charles pioneered the soul music genre during the 1950s by combining blues, rhythm and blues, and gospel styles into the music he recorded for Atlantic.
Ray Charles is often cited as popularizing the soul music genre with his series of hits, starting with 1954's "I Got a Woman".

Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award

Lifetime Achievement AwardLifetime AchievementLifetime Achievement Grammy
He was honored with the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1987; 10 of his recordings have been inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.

Georgia on My Mind

Georgia...on my mindGeorgia (On My Mind)
Charles' 1960 hit "Georgia On My Mind" was the first of his three career No.
It has often been associated with Ray Charles, a native of the U.S. state of Georgia, who recorded it for his 1960 album The Genius Hits the Road.

Country music

Countrycountry and westerncountry singer
He contributed to the integration of country music, rhythm and blues, and pop music during the 1960s with his crossover success on ABC Records, notably with his two Modern Sounds albums.
In 1962, Ray Charles surprised the pop world by turning his attention to country and western music, topping the charts and rating number three for the year on Billboard's pop chart with the "I Can't Stop Loving You" single, and recording the landmark album Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music.

Quincy Jones

QQuincy Jones-David Salzman EntertainmentAn Evening of Stars: Tribute to Quincy Jones
He became friends with Quincy Jones. Here he met and befriended, under the tutelage of Robert Blackwell, a 15-year-old Quincy Jones.
At age 14, Jones introduced himself to 16-year-old Ray Charles after watching him play at the Black Elks Club.

Jerry Wexler

WexlerGerald WexlerJerry [Wexler
Stone later helped Jerry Wexler find Charles in St. Petersburg.
He coined the term "rhythm and blues", and was integral in signing and/or producing many of the biggest acts of the time, including Ray Charles, the Allman Brothers, Chris Connor, Aretha Franklin, Led Zeppelin, Wilson Pickett, Dire Straits, Dusty Springfield and Bob Dylan.

Elvis Presley

ElvisPresleyGladys Presley
Billy Joel said, "This may sound like sacrilege, but I think Ray Charles was more important than Elvis Presley".
The others would centrally define the evolving sound of rock and roll: "Blue Suede Shoes"—"an improvement over Perkins' in almost every way", according to critic Robert Hilburn—and three R&B numbers that had been part of Presley's stage repertoire for some time, covers of Little Richard, Ray Charles, and The Drifters.

Robert Blackwell

Bumps BlackwellRobert "Bumps" BlackwellBlackwell
Here he met and befriended, under the tutelage of Robert Blackwell, a 15-year-old Quincy Jones.
Robert Alexander "Bumps" Blackwell (May 23, 1918 – March 9, 1985) was an American bandleader, songwriter, arranger, and record producer, best known for his work overseeing the early hits of Little Richard, as well as grooming Ray Charles, Quincy Jones, Ernestine Anderson, Lloyd Price, Sam Cooke, Herb Alpert, Larry Williams, and Sly and the Family Stone at the start of their music careers.

What'd I Say

What'd I Say (Part 1)What Did I SayWhat'd I Say?
In 1959, "What'd I Say" reached No.
"What'd I Say" (or "What I Say") is an American rhythm and blues song by Ray Charles, released in 1959.

The Great Ray Charles

He also recorded jazz, such as The Great Ray Charles (1957) and worked with vibraphonist Milt Jackson, releasing Soul Brothers in 1958 and Soul Meeting in 1961.
The Great Ray Charles is Ray Charles' second studio album for Atlantic Records, released in 1957.

Rhythm and blues

R&Brhythm & bluesRnB
Charles pioneered the soul music genre during the 1950s by combining blues, rhythm and blues, and gospel styles into the music he recorded for Atlantic.
He also cites Otis Rush, Ike Turner and Ray Charles, as R&B artists who employed this feel.

Swing Time Records

Swing TimeDown Beat Records
After signing with Swing Time Records, he recorded two more R&B hits under the name Ray Charles: "Baby, Let Me Hold Your Hand" (1951), which reached number five, and "Kissa Me Baby" (1952), which reached number eight.
Ray Charles, Percy Mayfield, Lowell Fulson, and other rhythm and blues and swing era artists of the 1940s first recorded for this company.

Lowell Fulson

Lowell FulsomLowell Folson
After the success of his first two singles, Charles moved to Los Angeles in 1950, and spent the next few years touring with the blues musician Lowell Fulson as his musical director.
At the age of eighteen, he moved to Ada, Oklahoma, and joined Alger "Texas" Alexander for a few months in 1940, but later moved to California, where he formed a band which soon included a young Ray Charles and the tenor saxophone player Stanley Turrentine.

Soul Brothers

He also recorded jazz, such as The Great Ray Charles (1957) and worked with vibraphonist Milt Jackson, releasing Soul Brothers in 1958 and Soul Meeting in 1961.
Soul Brothers is the fourth studio album recorded by Ray Charles and the eleventh studio album by Milt Jackson and released by Atlantic Records in 1958.

Mess Around

The Mess Around
In 1953, "Mess Around" became his first small hit for Atlantic; during the next year he had hits with "It Should've Been Me" and "Don't You Know".
Nugetre, or "Nuggy''", was one of Ray Charles’s first hits.

Soul Meeting

He also recorded jazz, such as The Great Ray Charles (1957) and worked with vibraphonist Milt Jackson, releasing Soul Brothers in 1958 and Soul Meeting in 1961.
Soul Meeting is the second studio album by Ray Charles and Milt Jackson, recorded in 1957 and released in 1961 on Atlantic Records.

This Little Girl of Mine

This Little Boy Of Mine
In 1955, he had hits with "This Little Girl of Mine" and "A Fool for You".
"This Little Girl of Mine" is a rhythm and blues single written and released as a single by Ray Charles in 1955 on the Atlantic label.

The Cookies

CookiesThe Cookies (girl group)
He hired a female singing group, The Cookies, and renamed them The Raelettes.
Members of the original lineup later became the Raelettes, the backing vocalists for Ray Charles.

Charles Brown (musician)

Charles BrownCharles Brown TrioThe Three Blazers featuring Charles Brown
Charles cited Nat King Cole as a primary influence, but his music was also influenced by Louis Jordan and Charles Brown.
He influenced such performers as Floyd Dixon, Cecil Gant, Ivory Joe Hunter, Percy Mayfield, Johnny Ace and Ray Charles.

The Genius of Ray Charles

Later in 1959, he released his first country song (a cover of Hank Snow's "I'm Movin' On") and recorded three more albums for the label: a jazz record (The Genius After Hours, 1961); a blues record (The Genius Sings the Blues, 1961); and a big band record (The Genius of Ray Charles, 1959) which was his first Top 40 album, peaking at number 17.
The Genius of Ray Charles is the sixth studio album by American recording artist Ray Charles, released in 1959 by Atlantic Records.

The Genius After Hours

Later in 1959, he released his first country song (a cover of Hank Snow's "I'm Movin' On") and recorded three more albums for the label: a jazz record (The Genius After Hours, 1961); a blues record (The Genius Sings the Blues, 1961); and a big band record (The Genius of Ray Charles, 1959) which was his first Top 40 album, peaking at number 17.
The Genius After Hours is a 1961 album by Ray Charles.