A report on Rhythm and blues and Ray Charles

Louis Jordan in New York City, c. undefined July 1946
Charles in the 1960s
The habanera rhythm shown as tresillo (lower notes) with the backbeat (upper note)
Charles in 1968
Fats Domino in 1956
Charles in 1971
Piano excerpt from the rumba boogie "Mardi Gras in New Orleans" (1949) by Professor Longhair. 2–3 claves are written above for rhythmic reference.
Charles meeting with President Richard Nixon, 1972 (photo by Oliver F. Atkins)
3–2 clave written in two measures in cut-time
Charles at the 2003 Montreal International Jazz Festival, one of his last public performances
Tresillo answered by the backbeat, the essence of clave in African American music
Quincy Jones worked with Ray Charles.
Bo Diddley's "Bo Diddley beat" is a clave-based motif.
Star honoring Charles on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, at 6777 Hollywood Boulevard
Ray Charles in 1971
Statue by Andy Davis in Ray Charles Plaza in Albany, Georgia
Ruth Brown was known as the "Queen of R&B"
Della Reese
Sam Cooke
Eric Burdon & the Animals (1964)

Charles pioneered the soul music genre during the 1950s by combining blues, jazz, rhythm and blues, and gospel styles into the music he recorded for Atlantic Records.

- Ray Charles

He also cites Otis Rush, Ike Turner and Ray Charles, as R&B artists who employed this feel.

- Rhythm and blues
Louis Jordan in New York City, c. undefined July 1946

10 related topics with Alpha

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American blues singer Ma Rainey (1886–1939), the "Mother of the Blues"

Blues

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Music genre and musical form which originated in the Deep South of the United States around the 1860s by African-Americans from roots in African-American work songs and spirituals.

Music genre and musical form which originated in the Deep South of the United States around the 1860s by African-Americans from roots in African-American work songs and spirituals.

American blues singer Ma Rainey (1886–1939), the "Mother of the Blues"
A minor pentatonic scale;
Musicologist John Lomax (left) shaking hands with musician "Uncle" Rich Brown in Sumterville, Alabama
Sheet music from "Saint Louis Blues" (1914)
Bessie Smith, an early blues singer, known for her powerful voice
A typical boogie-woogie bass line
John Lee Hooker
Blues legend B.B. King with his guitar, "Lucille"
Texas blues guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughan, 1983
Italian singer Zucchero is credited as the "Father of Italian Blues", and is among the few European blues artists who still enjoy international success.
Eric Clapton performing at Hyde Park, London, in June 2008
Duke Ellington straddled the big band and bebop genres. Ellington extensively used the blues form.
The music of Taj Mahal for the 1972 movie Sounder marked a revival of interest in acoustic blues.

The blues form, ubiquitous in jazz, rhythm and blues, and rock and roll, is characterized by the call-and-response pattern, the blues scale and specific chord progressions, of which the twelve-bar blues is the most common.

There are also 16-bar blues, such as Ray Charles's instrumental "Sweet 16 Bars" and Herbie Hancock's "Watermelon Man".

Atlantic Records

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American record label founded in October 1947 by Ahmet Ertegun and Herb Abramson.

American record label founded in October 1947 by Ahmet Ertegun and Herb Abramson.

Atlantic Records logo from its inception in 1947 to 1966 (it was still used on 7" single releases), used again from 1979 to 1981 and 2004 to 2015.
Atlantic logo used from 1966 to 2005. It was revived in 2015.
"Weird Al" Yankovic edits Atlantic Records' Wikipedia page to read "YOU SUCK!" in the music video for the song "White & Nerdy"

Over its first 20 years of operation, Atlantic earned a reputation as one of the most important American labels, specializing in jazz, R&B, and soul by Aretha Franklin, Ray Charles, Wilson Pickett, Sam and Dave, Ruth Brown and Otis Redding.

Al Green (1973), one of the genre's major pioneering artists

Soul music

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Popular music genre that originated in the African American community throughout the United States in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

Popular music genre that originated in the African American community throughout the United States in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

Al Green (1973), one of the genre's major pioneering artists
Ray Charles pioneered the soul music genre during the 1950s by combining blues, rhythm and blues, and gospel styles
James Brown was known as the "Godfather of Soul"
Sam Cooke is acknowledged as one of soul music's "forefathers".
Solomon Burke recorded for Atlantic in the 1960s
Aretha Franklin is widely known as the "Queen of Soul"
Marvin Gaye shifted to a soul sound with his 1971 hit "What's Going On"
Levi Stubbs singing lead with the Four Tops in 1966
Soul singer Otis Redding was an electrifying stage presence
Isaac Hayes performing in 1973
Adele performing in 2016

It has its roots in African-American gospel music and rhythm and blues.

Ray Charles is often cited as popularizing the soul music genre with his series of hits, starting with 1954's "I Got a Woman".

Jerry Wexler

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Music journalist who turned music producer, and was a major influence on American popular music from the 1950s through the 1980s.

Music journalist who turned music producer, and was a major influence on American popular music from the 1950s through the 1980s.

He coined the term "rhythm and blues", and was integral in signing and/or producing many of the biggest acts of the time, including Ray Charles, the Allman Brothers, Chris Connor, Aretha Franklin, Led Zeppelin, Wilson Pickett, Dire Straits, Dusty Springfield and Bob Dylan.

Presley in a publicity photograph for the 1957 film Jailhouse Rock

Elvis Presley

2 links

American singer and actor.

American singer and actor.

Presley in a publicity photograph for the 1957 film Jailhouse Rock
Presley's birthplace in Tupelo, Mississippi
A photo of Elvis's parents at the Historic Blue Moon Museum in Verona, Mississippi
Presley in a Sun Records promotional photograph, 1954
The "iconic cover" of Presley's 1956 debut album, an image crucial in codifying the guitar as the defining instrument of rock and roll
Presley signing autographs in Minneapolis in 1956
Ed Sullivan and Presley during rehearsals for his second appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show, October 26, 1956
Presley performing live at the Mississippi-Alabama Fairgrounds in Tupelo, September 26, 1956
Presley and costar Judy Tyler in the trailer for Jailhouse Rock, released October 1957
Presley being sworn into the U.S. Army at Fort Chaffee, Arkansas, March 24, 1958
Presley with Juliet Prowse in G.I. Blues
The '68 Comeback Special produced "one of the most famous images" of Presley. Taken on June 29, 1968, it was adapted for the cover of Rolling Stone in July 1969.
Presley meets U.S. President Richard Nixon in the White House Oval Office, December 21, 1970
Presley with friends Bill Porter and Paul Anka backstage at the Las Vegas Hilton on August 5, 1972
Presley came up with his outfit's eagle motif, as "something that would say 'America' to the world"
Presley's gravestone at Graceland
Presley with his longtime vocal backup group, the Jordanaires, March 1957
Publicity photo for the CBS program Stage Show, January 16, 1956
Poster for the film Girls! Girls! Girls! (1962), visualizing Presley's sex symbol image
Presley and Colonel Tom Parker, 1969
A group of Elvis impersonators in 2005
Presley's star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6777 Hollywood Blvd
Presley meets U.S. President Richard Nixon in the White House Oval Office, December 21, 1970

Presley, on rhythm acoustic guitar, and accompanied by lead guitarist Scotty Moore and bassist Bill Black, was a pioneer of rockabilly, an uptempo, backbeat-driven fusion of country music and rhythm and blues.

The others would centrally define the evolving sound of rock and roll: "Blue Suede Shoes"—"an improvement over Perkins' in almost every way", according to critic Robert Hilburn—and three R&B numbers that had been part of Presley's stage repertoire for some time, covers of Little Richard, Ray Charles, and The Drifters.

Ertegun circa 1960

Ahmet Ertegun

2 links

Turkish-American businessman, songwriter, record executive and philanthropist.

Turkish-American businessman, songwriter, record executive and philanthropist.

Ertegun circa 1960
The Ertegun family in 1942
Atlantic Records logo from its inception in 1947 to 1966 (it was still used on 7" single releases), used again from 1979 to 1981 and 2004 to 2015.
Ahmet (left) with his brother Nesuhi, around 1960

He discovered and championed many leading rhythm and blues and rock musicians.

Hit artists that recorded on Atlantic included Ruth Brown, Big Joe Turner, The Clovers, The Drifters, The Coasters and Ray Charles.

I Got a Woman

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"I Got a Woman" (originally titled "I've Got a Woman") is a song co-written and recorded by American R&B and soul musician Ray Charles.

Vernon Dalhart was the first country star to have a major hit record

Country music

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Genre of popular music that originated with blues, church music such as Southern gospel and spirituals, old-time, and American folk music forms including Appalachian, Cajun, Creole, and the cowboy Western music styles of New Mexico, Red Dirt, Tejano, and Texas country.

Genre of popular music that originated with blues, church music such as Southern gospel and spirituals, old-time, and American folk music forms including Appalachian, Cajun, Creole, and the cowboy Western music styles of New Mexico, Red Dirt, Tejano, and Texas country.

Vernon Dalhart was the first country star to have a major hit record
The Carter Family, are a dynasty of country music and began with (left to right) A.P. Carter, wife Sara Carter and Maybelle Carter
Roy Acuff
Publicity photo of Roy Rogers and Gail Davis, 1948
Bill and Charlie Monroe (1936). Bill Monroe (1911–1996) and the Blue Grass Boys created the bluegrass by the end of World War II.
Hank Williams
Johnny Cash
Willie Nelson (2009)
John Denver (1975)
Dolly Parton
A reunited Eagles in 2008
George Strait, a pioneer of the neotraditionalist movement and dubbed the "King of Country," Strait is one of the best selling musicians of all-time.
Garth Brooks
Shania Twain performing during her Up! Tour in 2004
Steve Earle performing in Ireland in 2007
Carrie Underwood at the 2019 American Music Awards
Miranda Lambert in 2019
Taylor Swift at the 2019 American Music Awards
Florida Georgia Line whose hit song "Cruise" drew attention to the bro-country genre
Emmylou Harris in 2008
Kacey Musgraves became one of the most controversial figures in contemporary country music.
Olivia Newton-John singing in Sydney in 2008
Keith Urban in 2007
Shania Twain in 2011
Lorenzo Antonio
Engelbert Humperdinck had hits with country songs
Vanha Isäntä, a Finnish country rock band, performing at the Helsinki Festival's open-air concert in Kaivopuisto in 1974. Seppo Sillanpää (violin) on the left and Olli Haavisto (guitar) on the right.
Example of cowboy hat and cowboy boots, two prominent components of country music fashion
Western wear shirt design, with snap fasteners
Painting of a cowboy singing by Thomas Eakins (1890)
Freddy Fender performing Tejano music after The Johnny Cash Show in Nashville, Tennessee (1977)
Bob Childers performing Red dirt in Okemah, Oklahoma (2001)
Al Hurricane and Al Hurricane Jr. performing New Mexico music at a fiesta in Old Town Albuquerque (2014)
Willie Nelson (2009)

Presley acknowledged the influence of rhythm and blues artists and his style, saying "The colored folk been singin' and playin' it just the way I'm doin' it now, man for more years than I know."

In 1962, Ray Charles surprised the pop world by turning his attention to country and western music, topping the charts and rating number three for the year on Billboard's pop chart with the "I Can't Stop Loving You" single, and recording the landmark album Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music.

Winwood in 2009

Steve Winwood

2 links

Winwood in 2009
Winwood on organ with Spencer Davis Group (Amsterdam, 1966)
Winwood with Traffic
Winwood in Knoxville, Tennessee (2005)
The Steve Winwood Band in 2009 on tour
Winwood at the Hangout Music Festival, May 2012

Stephen Lawrence Winwood (born 12 May 1948) is an English professional musician and songwriter whose genres include blue-eyed soul, rhythm and blues, blues rock and pop rock.

Winwood modelled his singing after Ray Charles.

Jordan in New York City, 1946

Louis Jordan

1 links

American saxophonist, multi-instrumentalist, songwriter and bandleader who was popular from the late 1930s to the early 1950s.

American saxophonist, multi-instrumentalist, songwriter and bandleader who was popular from the late 1930s to the early 1950s.

Jordan in New York City, 1946
Louis Jordan's Tympany Five
Jordan in New York, July 1946, shortly after getting second billing to Glen Gray at the Paramount

With his dynamic Tympany Five bands, Jordan mapped out the main parameters of the classic R&B, urban blues and early rock-and-roll genres with a series of highly influential 78-rpm discs released by Decca Records.

James Brown and Ray Charles also said that Jordan's style had an influence on their work.