Reactions to Occupy Wall Street

The Occupy Wall Street demonstrations garnered reactions of both praise and criticism from organizations and public figures in many parts of the world.wikipedia
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Occupy Wall Street

OccupyOccupy Wall Street Movement#OccupyWallStreet
The Occupy Wall Street demonstrations garnered reactions of both praise and criticism from organizations and public figures in many parts of the world.

Occupy movement

OccupyOccupy Wall Street movementoccupation
Over time, a long list of notable people from a range of backgrounds began and continue to lend their support or make reference to the Occupy movement in general. An NBC/Wall Street Journal survey released October 12 found that 37 percent of respondents "tend to support" the occupy movement, while 18 percent "tend to oppose" it. An October 13 survey by TIME magazine found that 54 percent of Americans have a favorable impression of the protests, while 23 percent have a negative impression.

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. Presidentpresidential
Domestic political responses have been both positive and critical, from the President of the United States to the 2012 presidential candidates.

Egypt

🇪🇬EgyptianEGY
International responses have come from the Egyptian protesters of Tahrir Square, Cardinal Peter Turkson, the Chinese state news agency (Xinhua), Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, and many others.

Tahrir Square

Tahrirmaidanssquare
International responses have come from the Egyptian protesters of Tahrir Square, Cardinal Peter Turkson, the Chinese state news agency (Xinhua), Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, and many others.

Peter Turkson

Peter Cardinal TurksonCardinal Peter TurksonPeter Kodwo Appiah Turkson
International responses have come from the Egyptian protesters of Tahrir Square, Cardinal Peter Turkson, the Chinese state news agency (Xinhua), Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, and many others.

Xinhua News Agency

XinhuaXinhua NewsXinhua News Agency Hong Kong Branch
International responses have come from the Egyptian protesters of Tahrir Square, Cardinal Peter Turkson, the Chinese state news agency (Xinhua), Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, and many others.

India

🇮🇳IndianIND
International responses have come from the Egyptian protesters of Tahrir Square, Cardinal Peter Turkson, the Chinese state news agency (Xinhua), Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, and many others.

Manmohan Singh

Dr. Manmohan SinghPrime Minister Manmohan SinghDr Manmohan Singh
International responses have come from the Egyptian protesters of Tahrir Square, Cardinal Peter Turkson, the Chinese state news agency (Xinhua), Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, and many others.

United Kingdom

British🇬🇧UK
Most international responses have been supportive of the movement, while some, such as former United Kingdom Prime Minister Tony Blair have criticized it.

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

Prime MinisterBritish Prime MinisterUK Prime Minister
Most international responses have been supportive of the movement, while some, such as former United Kingdom Prime Minister Tony Blair have criticized it.

Tony Blair

BlairTonyPrime Minister Tony Blair
Most international responses have been supportive of the movement, while some, such as former United Kingdom Prime Minister Tony Blair have criticized it.

MSNBC

msnbc.comMSNBC Latin AmericaEqual Time
On December 19, MSNBC reported a study which showed small-business owners "are almost evenly split on whether they support the protest movement."

NBC

National Broadcasting CompanyNBC-TVNBC Television
An NBC/Wall Street Journal survey released October 12 found that 37 percent of respondents "tend to support" the occupy movement, while 18 percent "tend to oppose" it. An October 13 survey by TIME magazine found that 54 percent of Americans have a favorable impression of the protests, while 23 percent have a negative impression.

The Wall Street Journal

Wall Street JournalWSJWall Street Jour.
An NBC/Wall Street Journal survey released October 12 found that 37 percent of respondents "tend to support" the occupy movement, while 18 percent "tend to oppose" it. An October 13 survey by TIME magazine found that 54 percent of Americans have a favorable impression of the protests, while 23 percent have a negative impression.

Time (magazine)

TimeTime'' magazineTime Magazine
An NBC/Wall Street Journal survey released October 12 found that 37 percent of respondents "tend to support" the occupy movement, while 18 percent "tend to oppose" it. An October 13 survey by TIME magazine found that 54 percent of Americans have a favorable impression of the protests, while 23 percent have a negative impression.

Gallup (company)

GallupGallup pollGallup Korea
An October 18 Gallup poll found that 22 percent of Americans agree with the protest's goals, while 15 percent disapprove and the remaining 61% say they don't know enough to decide.

CBS News

CBSCBS Radio NewsCBSNews.com
An October CBS News/New York Times polls found 43% of Americans agree with Occupy Wall Street while 27% disagree.

The New York Times

New York TimesNY TimesTimes
An October CBS News/New York Times polls found 43% of Americans agree with Occupy Wall Street while 27% disagree.

Rasmussen Reports

RasmussenRasmussen pollRasmussen report
An October Rasmussen poll found an almost even split, shows that 33 percent of Americans have a favorable view, while 27 percent are unfavorable and 40 percent have no opinion.

Quinnipiac University Polling Institute

Quinnipiac UniversityQuinnipiacQuinnipiac poll
A November 3 poll done by the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute found that 30 percent of American voters have a favorable view of the protests, while 39 percent do not.

Douglas Schoen

Schoen, Douglas E.
In an opinion piece in the Wall Street Journal, pollster Douglas Schoen wrote that polling of the protesters revealed "values that are dangerously out of touch with the broad mass of the American people" and have "a deep commitment to left-wing policies: opposition to free-market capitalism and support for radical redistribution of wealth, intense regulation of the private sector, and protectionist policies to keep American jobs from going overseas", and that politicians who support them will be hurt in the 2012 elections.

David Weigel

Dave WeigelWeigel, David
Journalist David Weigel responded in an opinion piece published on Slate characterizing Schoen's opinion piece as "a dishonest column full of claims that couldn't be backed up by his own research", while Washington Monthly lead blogger Steve Benen wrote an opinion piece accusing Schoen of political spin in his analysis and referring to Schoen, a frequent contributor to Fox News, as "the quintessential 'Fox News Democrat'".

Slate (magazine)

SlateSlate MagazineSlate'' magazine
Journalist David Weigel responded in an opinion piece published on Slate characterizing Schoen's opinion piece as "a dishonest column full of claims that couldn't be backed up by his own research", while Washington Monthly lead blogger Steve Benen wrote an opinion piece accusing Schoen of political spin in his analysis and referring to Schoen, a frequent contributor to Fox News, as "the quintessential 'Fox News Democrat'".