Reading Company

Reading RailroadReadingPhiladelphia and Reading RailroadRDGPhiladelphia & Reading RailroadPhiladelphia and Reading RailwayPhiladelphia and ReadingPhiladelphia and Reading Rail RoadPhiladelphia and Reading Railroad CompanyCity Cinemas
The Reading Company was a company that was involved in the railroad industry in southeast Pennsylvania and neighboring states from 1924 until 1976.wikipedia
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Reading, Pennsylvania

ReadingReading, PAReading, Berks County
Primarily, the P&R was constructed to haul anthracite coal from the mines in northeastern Pennsylvania's Coal Region to Philadelphia.The original P&R mainline extended south from the mining town of Pottsville to Reading and then onward to Philadelphia, following the gently graded banks of the Schuylkill River for nearly all of the 93-mile journey.
The city, which is approximately halfway between the state's most populous city, Philadelphia, and the state capital, Harrisburg (as well as about halfway between Allentown and Lancaster) is strategically situated along a major transportation route from Central to Eastern Pennsylvania, and lent its name to the now-defunct Reading Railroad, which transported anthracite coal from the Pennsylvania Coal Region to the eastern United States via the Port of Philadelphia.

Port Reading Railroad

Port Reading Secondary
The Reading further expanded its coal empire by reaching New York City by gaining control of the Delaware and Bound Brook Railroad in 1879, and building the Port Reading Railroad in 1892 with a line from Port Reading Junction to the Port Reading on the Arthur Kill.
The Port Reading Railroad was a railroad chartered in 1890 and opened in 1892 by the Reading Railroad.

Port Richmond, Philadelphia

Port RichmondPort Richmond neighborhoodRichmond
In Philadelphia, the Reading also built Port Richmond, the self-proclaimed "Largest privately owned railroad tidewater terminal in the world", which burnished the P&R's bottom lines by allowing coal to be loaded onto ships and barges for export.
During the 1800s, with the advent of the steam engine aboard ships, Port Richmond was a major terminus for colliers who received coal from the Reading Railroad facility at the port, and transported it to steam ships at other locations.

Port Reading, New Jersey

Port ReadingPort Reading shipping terminal
The Reading further expanded its coal empire by reaching New York City by gaining control of the Delaware and Bound Brook Railroad in 1879, and building the Port Reading Railroad in 1892 with a line from Port Reading Junction to the Port Reading on the Arthur Kill.
Port Reading was built in the late 19th century by the Reading Railroad of Pennsylvania to serve their shipping needs, especially coal from the Pennsylvania anthracite coal fields.

Pottsville, Pennsylvania

PottsvillePottsville city linePottsville, Pa.
Primarily, the P&R was constructed to haul anthracite coal from the mines in northeastern Pennsylvania's Coal Region to Philadelphia.The original P&R mainline extended south from the mining town of Pottsville to Reading and then onward to Philadelphia, following the gently graded banks of the Schuylkill River for nearly all of the 93-mile journey.
The Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company, which has its roots in the Philadelphia and Reading Railway Company, the remnants of which were acquired in the late 20th century by the Reading Anthracite Company, acquired extensive coal lands and would become one of the most notable of the coal companies operating in Pennsylvania until the demise of the anthracite industry after World War II.

Lehigh Valley

Lehigh Valley, PennsylvaniaAllentown-Bethlehem-Easton, PA-NJ Metropolitan Statistical AreaEastern Pennsylvania
In 1879, the Reading gained control of the North Pennsylvania Railroad and gained access to the burgeoning steel industry in the Lehigh Valley.
Norfolk Southern Railway uses the former Lehigh Valley Railroad's main line, the Lehigh Line and also uses a former Reading Company (Reading Railroad) branch line, the Reading Line.

Little Schuylkill Navigation, Railroad and Coal Company

Little SchuylkillLittle Schuylkill Navigation RailroadLittle Schuylkill Railroad
Along with the Little Schuylkill, a horse-drawn railroad in the Schuylkill River Valley, it formed the earliest components of what became the Reading Company.
The LSRR operated between Tamaqua, located at the end of the coal rich Panther Creek Valley and the Port Clinton terminus of the Schuylkill Canal, beginning in 1831 with horse-drawn cars and later to a rail junction with the Philadelphia and Reading Railway Company.

Junction Railroad (Philadelphia)

Junction Railroad
On July 1, 1873, the PW&B agreed to lease the freight rights to the P&R for "$350,000 payable at the time the lease was made and $1 a yearthereafter" for a term of 999 years with the stipulation that no passenger trains would use it. The Reading dubbed the line, along with some connecting track, its Philadelphia and Chester Branch; southbound trains reached it via the Junction Railroad, jointly controlled by PW&B, Reading, and PRR, and continued on to the connecting Chester and Delaware River Railroad.
The line connected the Philadelphia and Reading Rail Road line at the west end of the Columbia Bridge over the Schuylkill River, crossed the Pennsylvania Railroad line, ran parallel to Market Street, and turned south to connect with the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore Railroad at Gray's Ferry.

Pennsylvania Railroad

PRRPennsylvaniaPennsylvania Railroad Company
This gave the Reading a route from Philadelphia to Harrisburg, for the first time competing directly with the Pennsylvania Railroad, which became its major rival.
This action forced the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O) to build the Baltimore and Philadelphia Railroad to keep its Philadelphia access, where it connected with the Reading Railroad for its competing Royal Blue Line passenger trains to reach New York.

Archibald Angus McLeod

Archibald A. McLeod
In 1890, Reading president Archibald A. McLeod saw that more riches could be earned by expanding its rail network and becoming a trunk railroad.
He later worked his way up the ranks of the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad to become its president in 1890.

Schuylkill River

SchuylkillSchuylkill ValleySchuylkill watershed
Along with the Little Schuylkill, a horse-drawn railroad in the Schuylkill River Valley, it formed the earliest components of what became the Reading Company.
The river itself, the Schuylkill Canal, the Reading Railroad, and the Pennsylvania Railroad were vital shipping conduits from the second decade of the 19th century through the mid-20th century.

Lebanon Valley Railroad

Lebanon Valley Branch
The Lebanon Valley Railroad was chartered in 1836 to build from Reading west to Harrisburg.
The road was acquired by the Reading Railroad on 20 March 1858, which put them in direct competition with the Pennsylvania Railroad for the Philadelphia to Harrisburg route.

Mount Carbon, Pennsylvania

Mount Carbon
An extension northwest from Reading to Mount Carbon, also on the Schuylkill River, opened on January 13, 1842, allowing the railroad to compete with the Schuylkill Canal.
Mount Carbon was the end of the original Philadelphia and Reading Railroad, opened in 1842.

Atlantic City Railroad

Camden County RailroadCamden, Gloucester & Mt. Ephraim RailwayPhiladelphia and Atlantic City Railroad
Led by Samual Richards, an officer of the C&A for 24 years, they established the Philadelphia and Atlantic City Railway (P&AC) on March 24, 1876.
The Atlantic City Railroad was a Philadelphia and Reading Railway subsidiary that became part of Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines in 1933.

Central Railroad of New Jersey

Jersey CentralCNJCentral of New Jersey
He was able to gain control of the Lehigh Valley Railroad, Central Railroad of New Jersey, and the Boston and Maine Railroad.
In 1901 the Reading Railroad gained control of the CNJ, which lasted until the creation of Conrail on April 1, 1976.

Pickering Valley Railroad

Byers railroad station
Also that year, the Reading leased the Pickering Valley Railroad, a branch running west from Phoenixville to Byers, which opened in 1871.
Operated as a unit of the Reading Railroad, the Pickering Valley was not a great success; passenger service was discontinued in 1934, and much of the line was abandoned in 1948.

Reading Terminal

headhouse terminal
Under his leadership, the Reading Company was formed and the P&R was absorbed into it on November 30. Also in 1893, the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad built its most famous structure, Reading Terminal in Philadelphia.
The Reading Terminal is a complex of buildings that includes the former Reading Company main station located in the Market East section of Center City in the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States.

Lehigh Valley Railroad

Lehigh ValleyLVLVRR
He was able to gain control of the Lehigh Valley Railroad, Central Railroad of New Jersey, and the Boston and Maine Railroad.
In 1892, the Reading Railroad thought it had a solution — instead of attempting to maintain agreements among the coal railroads, it would purchase or lease the major lines and bring them into a monopoly.

Port Kennedy, Pennsylvania

Port Kennedy
The Port Kennedy Railroad, a short branch to quarries at Port Kennedy, was leased in 1870.
Built along the Schuylkill Canal and, after 1849, the Reading Railroad, the village was a center for the lime industry in the 19th century.

National Railway

D&BB
The Reading further expanded its coal empire by reaching New York City by gaining control of the Delaware and Bound Brook Railroad in 1879, and building the Port Reading Railroad in 1892 with a line from Port Reading Junction to the Port Reading on the Arthur Kill.
Part of it was eventually built from New York to Philadelphia by the Delaware and Bound Brook Railroad and the Delaware River Branch of the North Pennsylvania Railroad, leased by the Philadelphia and Reading Railway in 1879 and becoming its New York Branch.

Joseph Smith Harris

belowJ. S. HarrisJoseph
Amid the turmoil of the Panic of 1893, Joseph Smith Harris was elected president.
He worked his way through a considerable number of adventures to become president of the Reading Railroad, which he brought back from its 1893 bankruptcy.

Phoenixville, Pennsylvania

PhoenixvillePickeringFrench Creek bridge
Also that year, the Reading leased the Pickering Valley Railroad, a branch running west from Phoenixville to Byers, which opened in 1871.
The Reading Railroad entered the east side of town via a station above Bridge Street.

Liberty Street Ferry Terminal

At the New York end it used the Central Railroad of New Jersey's Jersey City Terminal from which passengers could board ferries to Liberty Street Ferry Terminal, Whitehall Terminal, and West 23rd Street in lower Manhattan.
Liberty Street Ferry Terminal or Liberty Street Terminal was the Central Railroad of New Jersey's passenger ferry slip in lower Manhattan and the point of departure and embarkation for passengers in New York City who traveled on the Central Railroad of New Jersey, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, Reading Railroad and the Lehigh Valley Railroad.

Atlantic City, New Jersey

Atlantic CityAtlantic City, NJAtlantic City, NJ, USA
During 1875, four members of the Camden and Atlantic Railroad board of directors resigned to build a second railroad from Camden, New Jersey, to Atlantic City by way of Clementon.
A booklet included with the reprinted 1935 edition states that the four railroads that served Atlantic City in the mid-1930s were the Jersey Central, the Seashore Lines, the Reading Railroad, and the Pennsylvania Railroad.

J. P. Morgan

J.P. MorganJ. Pierpont MorganJohn Pierpont Morgan
The Reading almost achieved its goal of becoming a trunk road, but the deal was scuttled by J.P.Morgan and other rail barons, who did not want more competition in the northeastern railroad business.
Reading Railroad