Real property

landimmovable propertyrealtypropertyrealreal estateimmovablereal propertieslaw of real propertyheritable property
In English common law, real property, real estate, realty, or immovable property is land which is the property of some person and all structures (also called improvements or fixtures) integrated with or affixed to the land, including crops, buildings, machinery, wells, dams, ponds, mines, canals, and roads, among other things.wikipedia
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Fixture (property law)

fixturesfixturefixtures law
In English common law, real property, real estate, realty, or immovable property is land which is the property of some person and all structures (also called improvements or fixtures) integrated with or affixed to the land, including crops, buildings, machinery, wells, dams, ponds, mines, canals, and roads, among other things.
A fixture, as a legal concept, means any physical property that is permanently attached (fixed) to real property (usually land) Property not affixed to real property is considered chattel property.

Property

propertiesproprietarypatrimony
In English common law, real property, real estate, realty, or immovable property is land which is the property of some person and all structures (also called improvements or fixtures) integrated with or affixed to the land, including crops, buildings, machinery, wells, dams, ponds, mines, canals, and roads, among other things.
Important widely recognized types of property include real property (the combination of land and any improvements to or on the land), personal property (physical possessions belonging to a person), private property (property owned by legal persons, business entities or individual natural persons), public property (state owned or publicly owned and available possessions) and intellectual property (exclusive rights over artistic creations, inventions, etc.), although the last is not always as widely recognized or enforced.

Personal property

chattelchattelsmovable property
The term is historic, arising from the now-discontinued form of action, which distinguished between real property disputes and personal property disputes.
Personal property can be understood in comparison to real estate, immovable property or real property (such as land and buildings).

Land description

legal descriptiondetermining or documenting the boundaries of lotslegal descriptions
To be of any value, a claim to any property must be accompanied by a verifiable and legal property description.
A land description location of the written words which delineate a specific piece of real property.

Estate in land

estateestates in landestates
The law recognizes different sorts of interests called estates, in real property.
An estate in land is an interest in real property that is or may become possessory.

Fence

fencingsecurity fencePrivacy fencing
Such a description usually makes use of natural or man-made boundaries such as seacoasts, rivers, streams, the crests of ridges, lakeshores, highways, roads, and railroad tracks or purpose-built markers such as cairns, surveyor's posts, fences, official government surveying marks (such as ones affixed by the National Geodetic Survey), and so forth.

Lease

leasinglesseeleases
The type of estate is generally determined by the language of the deed, lease, bill of sale, will, land grant, etc., through which the estate was acquired.
Similar principles apply to real property as well as to personal property, though the terminology differs.

Fee tail

entailOrdynatentailed
In English common law, fee tail or entail is a form of trust established by deed or settlement which restricts the sale or inheritance of an estate in real property and prevents the property from being sold, devised by will, or otherwise alienated by the tenant-in-possession, and instead causes it to pass automatically by operation of law to an heir determined by the settlement deed.

Advowson

patronagepatronadvowsons
As a result of this formalist approach, some things the common law deems to be land would not be classified as such by most modern legal systems: for example, an advowson (the right to nominate a priest) was real property.
Legally, advowsons were treated as real property that could be held or conveyed, and conversely could be taken or encumbered, in the same general manner as a parcel of land.

Leasehold estate

tenantsleaseholdtenant
By contrast the rights of a leaseholder originate in personal actions and so the common law originally treated a leasehold as part of personal property.
A leasehold estate is an ownership of a temporary right to hold land or property in which a lessee or a tenant holds rights of real property by some form of title from a lessor or landlord.

Fee simple

freeholdfreeholdersfreehold title
It is a way that real estate and land may be owned in common law countries, and is the highest possible ownership interest that can be held in real property.

Allodial title

allodialallodial rightalod
*Allodial title: Real property that is independent of any superior landlord.
Allodial title constitutes ownership of real property (land, buildings, and fixtures) that is independent of any superior landlord.

Will and testament

willwillslast will and testament
The type of estate is generally determined by the language of the deed, lease, bill of sale, will, land grant, etc., through which the estate was acquired.

Life estate

life tenancylife tenanttenant for life
In legal terms, it is an estate in real property that ends at death when ownership of the property may revert to the original owner, or it may pass to another person.

Estate (law)

estateestatesestate law
Estates may be held jointly as joint tenants with rights of survivorship or as tenants in common.
Depending on the particular context, the term is also used in reference to an estate in land or of a particular kind of property (such as real estate or personal estate).

Escheat

escheatorEscheatedescheats
This fact is material when, for example, property has been disclaimed by its erstwhile owner, in which case the law of escheat applies.
Escheat is a common law doctrine that transfers the real property of a person who has died without heirs to the Crown or state.

Easement

easementswayleaveright-of-way
One such relationship is the easement, where the owner of one property has the right to pass over a neighbouring property.
An easement is a nonpossessory right to use and/or enter onto the real property of another without possessing it.

Reversion (law)

reversionreverterrevert
Reversions are commonly created in real property transactions, particularly during lease arrangements as well as devise (the transfer of real property through a will).

Profit (real property)

profit a prendreprofitprofits-à-prendre
Another is the various "incorporeal hereditaments", such as profits-à-prendre, where an individual may have the right to take crops from land that is part of another's estate.
A profit (short for profit-à-prendre in Middle French for "right of taking"), in the law of real property, is a nonpossessory interest in land similar to the better-known easement, which gives the holder the right to take natural resources such as petroleum, minerals, timber, and wild game from the land of another.

Surveying

surveyorsurveyland surveyor
Such a description usually makes use of natural or man-made boundaries such as seacoasts, rivers, streams, the crests of ridges, lakeshores, highways, roads, and railroad tracks or purpose-built markers such as cairns, surveyor's posts, fences, official government surveying marks (such as ones affixed by the National Geodetic Survey), and so forth.
They must also know the laws that deal with surveys, real property, and contracts.

Transfer deed

The death of a co-owner of a tenants in common (TIC) deed will have a heritable portion of the estate in proportion to his ownership interest which is presumed to be equal among all tenants unless otherwise stated in the transfer deed.
A transfer deed is a document used in conveyancing in England and Wales to transfer real property from its legal owner to another party.

Land tenure

landownerlandownersland ownership
Allodial title is a system in which real property is owned absolutely free and clear of any superior landlord or sovereign.

England

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In English common law, real property, real estate, realty, or immovable property is land which is the property of some person and all structures (also called improvements or fixtures) integrated with or affixed to the land, including crops, buildings, machinery, wells, dams, ponds, mines, canals, and roads, among other things.

Common law

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In English common law, real property, real estate, realty, or immovable property is land which is the property of some person and all structures (also called improvements or fixtures) integrated with or affixed to the land, including crops, buildings, machinery, wells, dams, ponds, mines, canals, and roads, among other things.