Reconstruction Amendments

Constitutional Amendments13th, 14th and 15th amendmentsAmendmentsamendments to the ConstitutionCivil War Amendmentsconstitutional rightsReconstructionreconstruction amendmentThree amendments
The Reconstruction Amendments are the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth amendments to the United States Constitution, adopted between 1865 and 1870, the five years immediately following the Civil War.wikipedia
107 Related Articles

Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

Fourteenth Amendment14th AmendmentFourteenth
The Reconstruction Amendments are the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth amendments to the United States Constitution, adopted between 1865 and 1870, the five years immediately following the Civil War.
The Fourteenth Amendment (Amendment XIV) to the United States Constitution was adopted on July 9, 1868, as one of the Reconstruction Amendments.

Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

Thirteenth Amendment13th AmendmentThirteenth
The Reconstruction Amendments are the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth amendments to the United States Constitution, adopted between 1865 and 1870, the five years immediately following the Civil War.
It was the first of the three Reconstruction Amendments adopted following the American Civil War.

Fifteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

Fifteenth Amendment15th AmendmentFifteenth
The Reconstruction Amendments are the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth amendments to the United States Constitution, adopted between 1865 and 1870, the five years immediately following the Civil War.
It was ratified on February 3, 1870, as the third and last of the Reconstruction Amendments.

American Civil War

Civil WarU.S. Civil WarUnited States Civil War
The Reconstruction Amendments are the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth amendments to the United States Constitution, adopted between 1865 and 1870, the five years immediately following the Civil War.
During the Reconstruction era that followed the war, national unity was slowly restored, the national government expanded its power, and civil and political rights were granted to freed black slaves through amendments to the Constitution and federal legislation.

Reconstruction era

ReconstructionpostbellumCongressional Reconstruction
The Reconstruction amendments were important in implementing the Reconstruction of the American South after the war.
These Reconstruction Amendments established the rights that led to Supreme Court rulings in the mid-20th century that struck down school segregation.

Voting Rights Act of 1965

Voting Rights Act1965 Voting Rights ActNational Voting Rights Act of 1965
The full benefits of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth amendments were not realized until the Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 and laws such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
After the Civil War, the three Reconstruction Amendments were ratified and limited this discretion.

Constitution of the United States

United States ConstitutionU.S. ConstitutionConstitution
The Reconstruction Amendments are the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth amendments to the United States Constitution, adopted between 1865 and 1870, the five years immediately following the Civil War.
Among these, Amendments 1–10 are collectively known as the Bill of Rights, and Amendments 13–15 are known as the Reconstruction Amendments.

Freedman

freedmenfreed slavesfreedwoman
The amendment addresses citizenship rights and equal protection of the laws, and was proposed in response to issues related to treatment of freedmen following the war.
The 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments are known as the "civil rights amendments", the "post-Civil War amendments", and the "Reconstruction Amendments".

Corwin Amendment

Committee of Thirty-Threeproposed Thirteenth AmendmentSlavery Amendment
As a result, the later Reconstruction Amendments (Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth) would not have been permissible, as they abolish or interfere with the domestic institution of the states.

Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution

Twelfth Amendment12th Amendment12th Amendment to the US Constitution
The last time the Constitution had been amended was with the Twelfth Amendment more than 60 years earlier in 1804.

Southern United States

SouthSouthernAmerican South
The Reconstruction amendments were important in implementing the Reconstruction of the American South after the war.

Abraham Lincoln

LincolnPresident LincolnPresident Abraham Lincoln
Their proponents saw them as transforming the United States from a country that was (in Abraham Lincoln's words) "half slave and half free" to one in which the constitutionally guaranteed "blessings of liberty" would be extended to the entire populace, including the former slaves and their descendants.

Slavery in the United States

slaveryslavesslave
Their proponents saw them as transforming the United States from a country that was (in Abraham Lincoln's words) "half slave and half free" to one in which the constitutionally guaranteed "blessings of liberty" would be extended to the entire populace, including the former slaves and their descendants. The Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution abolished slavery and involuntary servitude, except as punishment for a crime.

Slaughter-House Cases

Slaughterhouse CasesThe Slaughterhouse CasesThe Slaughter-House Cases
Important Supreme Court decisions that undermined these amendments were the Slaughter-House Cases in 1873, which prevented rights guaranteed under the Fourteenth Amendment's privileges or immunities clause from being extended to rights under state law; and Plessy v. Ferguson in 1896 which originated the phrase "separate but equal" and gave federal approval to Jim Crow laws.

Plessy v. Ferguson

Plessy vs. FergusonPlessy vs FergusonPlessey v. Ferguson
Important Supreme Court decisions that undermined these amendments were the Slaughter-House Cases in 1873, which prevented rights guaranteed under the Fourteenth Amendment's privileges or immunities clause from being extended to rights under state law; and Plessy v. Ferguson in 1896 which originated the phrase "separate but equal" and gave federal approval to Jim Crow laws.

Separate but equal

separate but equal educationdrinking from the fountain reserved for blacksequal facilities were rarely provided
Important Supreme Court decisions that undermined these amendments were the Slaughter-House Cases in 1873, which prevented rights guaranteed under the Fourteenth Amendment's privileges or immunities clause from being extended to rights under state law; and Plessy v. Ferguson in 1896 which originated the phrase "separate but equal" and gave federal approval to Jim Crow laws.

Brown v. Board of Education

Brown vs. Board of EducationBrown v. Board of Education of TopekaBrown v. Board
The full benefits of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth amendments were not realized until the Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 and laws such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Civil Rights Act of 1964

Civil Rights ActTitle VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964Title VII
The full benefits of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth amendments were not realized until the Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 and laws such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Involuntary servitude

involuntary domestic servitudeinvoluntaryservitude
The Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution abolished slavery and involuntary servitude, except as punishment for a crime.

Union (American Civil War)

UnionUnionistNorth
The measure was swiftly ratified by all but three Union states (the exceptions were Delaware, New Jersey, and Kentucky), and by a sufficient number of border and "reconstructed" Southern states, to be ratified by December 6, 1865.

United States Secretary of State

Secretary of StateU.S. Secretary of StateUS Secretary of State
On December 18, 1865, Secretary of State William H. Seward proclaimed it to have been incorporated into the federal Constitution.

William H. Seward

William SewardWilliam Henry SewardSeward
On December 18, 1865, Secretary of State William H. Seward proclaimed it to have been incorporated into the federal Constitution.

Promulgation

promulgatedpromulgateproclaiming
On December 18, 1865, Secretary of State William H. Seward proclaimed it to have been incorporated into the federal Constitution.

Three-Fifths Compromise

three-fifths clausethree-fifthsThree Fifths Compromise
Slavery had been tacitly enshrined in the original Constitution through provisions such as Article I, Section 2, Clause 3, commonly known as the Three-Fifths Compromise, which detailed how each state's total slave population would be factored into its total population count for the purposes of apportioning seats in the United States House of Representatives and direct taxes among the states.