A report on Rectum

Scheme of digestive tract, with rectum marked
The inside of a normal human rectum in a 70-year-old, seen during colonoscopy
Retroflexed view of the human rectum seen at colonoscopy showing anal verge
A digital rectal exam is conducted to investigate or diagnose conditions including of the prostate.
Arteries of the pelvis
Blood vessels of the rectum and anus
Cross-section microscopic shot of the rectal wall
Dog rectum cross-section (40×)
Microscopic cross-section of the rectum of a dog (400×), showing a high concentration of goblet cells in amongst the column-shaped lining. Goblet cells can be seen as the circular cells with a clear inner material (cytoplasm).

Final straight portion of the large intestine in humans and some other mammals, and the gut in others.

- Rectum
Scheme of digestive tract, with rectum marked

36 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Front of abdomen, showing the large intestine, with the stomach and small intestine in gray.

Large intestine

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Last part of the gastrointestinal tract and of the digestive system in vertebrates.

Last part of the gastrointestinal tract and of the digestive system in vertebrates.

Front of abdomen, showing the large intestine, with the stomach and small intestine in gray.
Illustration of the large intestine.
Inner diameters of colon sections
Colonic crypts (intestinal glands) within four tissue sections. The cells have been stained to show a brown-orange color if the cells produce the mitochondrial protein cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (CCOI), and the nuclei of the cells (located at the outer edges of the cells lining the walls of the crypts) are stained blue-gray with haematoxylin. Panels A, B were cut across the long axes of the crypts and panels C, D were cut parallel to the long axes of the crypts. In panel A the bar shows 100 µm and allows an estimate of the frequency of crypts in the colonic epithelium. Panel B includes three crypts in cross-section, each with one segment deficient for CCOI expression and at least one crypt, on the right side, undergoing fission into two crypts. Panel C shows, on the left side, a crypt fissioning into two crypts. Panel D shows typical small clusters of two and three CCOI deficient crypts (the bar shows 50 µm). The images were made from original photomicrographs, but panels A, B and D were also included in an article and illustrations were published with Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial License allowing re-use.
Histological section.
Colonoscopy image, splenic flexure,
normal mucosa. You can see spleen through it : the black part
Micrograph of normal large instestinal crypts.
Anatomy of normal large intestinal crypts
Intestines
Colon. Deep dissection. Anterior view.

Water is absorbed here and the remaining waste material is stored in the rectum as feces before being removed by defecation.

Diagram of stomach, intestines and rectum in the average human

Gastrointestinal tract

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Tract or passageway of the digestive system that leads from the mouth to the anus.

Tract or passageway of the digestive system that leads from the mouth to the anus.

Diagram of stomach, intestines and rectum in the average human
Illustration of the small intestine

In humans, the small intestine is further subdivided into the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum while the large intestine is subdivided into the cecum, ascending, transverse, descending and sigmoid colon, rectum, and anal canal.

Anatomy of the anus and rectum

Anal canal

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Anatomy of the anus and rectum
Anatomy of the anus and rectum
Left levator ani from within
The interior of the anal canal and lower part of the rectum
Median sagittal section of male pelvis
Median sagittal section of female pelvis

The anal canal is the part that connects the rectum to the anus, located below the level of the pelvic diaphragm.

Sigmoidoscopy

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Sigmoidoscopy (from the Greek term for letter "s/ς" + "eidos" + "scopy": namely, to look inside an "s"/"ς"-like object) is the minimally invasive medical examination of the large intestine from the rectum through to the nearest part of the colon, the sigmoid colon.

The blood vessels of the rectum and anus, showing the distribution and anastomosis on the posterior surface near the termination of the gut. (Labeled as hemorrhoidal artery.)

Middle rectal artery

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The blood vessels of the rectum and anus, showing the distribution and anastomosis on the posterior surface near the termination of the gut. (Labeled as hemorrhoidal artery.)
Internal iliac artery, showing branches, including middle rectal artery
Sigmoid colon and rectum, showing distribution of branches of inferior mesenteric artery and their anastomoses.
Middle rectal artery

The middle rectal artery is an artery in the pelvis that supplies blood to the rectum.

Drawing of colon seen from front
(sigmoid colon coloured blue)

Sigmoid colon

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Drawing of colon seen from front
(sigmoid colon coloured blue)
1: Ascending colon<BR>2: Transverse colon<BR>3: Descending colon<BR>4: Sigmoid colon<BR>5: Rectum
Iliac colon, sigmoid or pelvic colon, and rectum seen from the front, after removal of pubic bones and bladder
Sagittal section of the lower part of a female trunk, right segment

The sigmoid colon (or pelvic colon) is the part of the large intestine that is closest to the rectum and anus.

Human anatomy of the anorecturm (anus and rectum)

Defecation

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Necessary process by which organisms eliminate a solid, semisolid, or liquid waste material known as feces from the digestive tract via the anus.

Necessary process by which organisms eliminate a solid, semisolid, or liquid waste material known as feces from the digestive tract via the anus.

Human anatomy of the anorecturm (anus and rectum)
The caganer is a defecating figurine in Spanish nativity scenes

Waves of muscular contraction (known as peristalsis) in the walls of the colon move fecal matter through the digestive tract towards the rectum.

Histological section of the ureter, showing the thick muscular layers surrounding the lumen.

Muscular layer

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Region of muscle in many organs in the vertebrate body, adjacent to the submucosa.

Region of muscle in many organs in the vertebrate body, adjacent to the submucosa.

Histological section of the ureter, showing the thick muscular layers surrounding the lumen.

Thinnest muscularis layer in the alimentary canal is found in the rectum, where minimum peristalsis occurs.

Sigmoid colon and rectum, showing distribution of branches of inferior mesenteric artery and their anastomoses. (Superior hemorrhoidal artery visible at center right.)

Superior rectal artery

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Sigmoid colon and rectum, showing distribution of branches of inferior mesenteric artery and their anastomoses. (Superior hemorrhoidal artery visible at center right.)
The posterior aspect of the rectum exposed by removing the lower part of the sacrum and the coccyx.

The superior rectal artery (superior hemorrhoidal artery) is an artery that descends into the pelvis to supply blood to the rectum.

Drawing of colon seen from front (descending colon coloured blue)

Descending colon

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Part of the colon from the splenic flexure to the beginning of the sigmoid colon.

Part of the colon from the splenic flexure to the beginning of the sigmoid colon.

Drawing of colon seen from front (descending colon coloured blue)
Inner diameters of different sections of the large intestine, with descending/sigmoid colon (at right) measuring on average 6.3 cm (range 6.0-6.8 cm).

The function of the descending colon in the digestive system is to store the remains of digested food that will be emptied into the rectum.