Red River Rebellion

Red River Resistance1869Riel RebellionRebellionRed River1870First Riel RebellionLouis Riel RebellionLouis Riel's rebellionMetis List of Rights
The Red River Rebellion (or the Red River Resistance, Red River uprising, or First Riel Rebellion) was the sequence of events that led up to the 1869 establishment of a provisional government by the Métis leader Louis Riel and his followers at the Red River Colony, in what is now the Canadian province of Manitoba.wikipedia
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Louis Riel

RielexecutionRiel Rebellions
The Red River Rebellion (or the Red River Resistance, Red River uprising, or First Riel Rebellion) was the sequence of events that led up to the 1869 establishment of a provisional government by the Métis leader Louis Riel and his followers at the Red River Colony, in what is now the Canadian province of Manitoba.
The first resistance led by Riel became known as the Red River Rebellion of 1869–1870.

Dominion Land Survey

2nd Meridiancorrection lineroad allowances
Before the land was officially transferred to Canada, McDougall sent out surveyors to plot the land according to the square township system used in the Public Land Survey System.
This did not go over well and was a catalyst to the events of the Red River Rebellion.

Wolseley expedition

Red River ExpeditionRed River Expeditionary ForceRed River Expedition of 1870
Now known as the Wolseley Expedition (or Red River Expedition), it consisted of Canadian militia and British regular soldiers led by Colonel Garnet Wolseley.
The Wolseley expedition was a military force authorized by Sir John A. Macdonald to confront Louis Riel and the Métis in 1870, during the Red River Rebellion, at the Red River Colony in what is now the Canadian province of Manitoba.

Manitoba Act

Manitoba Act, 1870create the province of Manitobamade
In 1870, the national legislature passed the Manitoba Act, allowing the Red River Colony to enter Confederation as the province of Manitoba.
This time period is known as the Red River Resistance or Rebellion.

Thomas Scott (Orangeman)

Thomas Scottanother person of the same nameman of the same name executed by Louis Riel
They included an Orangeman named Thomas Scott.
Scott was employed by the Canadian government as a surveyor during the Red River Rebellion.

Red River Colony

Red River SettlementRed RiverSelkirk Settlement
The Red River Rebellion (or the Red River Resistance, Red River uprising, or First Riel Rebellion) was the sequence of events that led up to the 1869 establishment of a provisional government by the Métis leader Louis Riel and his followers at the Red River Colony, in what is now the Canadian province of Manitoba.
Provincial status was accelerated by Louis Riel's rebellion.

William Mactavish

William McTavishWilliam
Catholic Bishop Taché, the Anglican bishop of Rupert's land Robert Machray, and the HBC governor of Assiniboia William Mactavish all warned the federal government that such surveys would precipitate unrest.
Often referred to as, "The Last Governor of Assiniboia," Mactavish is frequently criticized for his role (or lack thereof) in the Red River Rebellion.

Rupert's Land

Rupert’s LandPrince Rupert's LandRuperts Land
For a period it had been a territory called Rupert's Land under control of the Hudson's Bay Company.
Control was originally planned to be transferred on 1 December 1869, but due to the premature action of the new lieutenant governor, William McDougall, the people of Red River formed a provisional government that took control until arrangements could be negotiated by leaders of what is known as the Red River Resistance and the newly formed Government of Canada.

Hudson's Bay Company

Hudson’s Bay CompanyHBCHudson Bay Company
For a period it had been a territory called Rupert's Land under control of the Hudson's Bay Company.

Anglo-Métis

Anglo-MetisCountry-bornCountryborn
Their mixed-race descendants were generally English-speaking and were sometimes known as the "country born" (also as Anglo-Métis).
The Anglo-Métis played a role in both the Red River Rebellion (or "Red River Uprising") of 1869 and the Northwest Rebellion (or "Northwest Uprising") of 1885, as they suffered from similar issues of racial discrimination and land problems as their francophone brethren.

James Ross (Canadian lawyer)

James RossJames
After few accomplishments at the first meeting, James Ross expressed displeasure at Riel's treatment of McDougall.
James Ross (9 May 1835 – 20 September 1871) was a Metis journalist, lawyer, and member of the provisional government established by Louis Riel during the Red River Rebellion of 1869 – 1870.

Ambroise-Dydime Lépine

Ambroise LepineAmbroise-DydimeAmbroise-Dydime Lepine
On November 2 under the command of Ambroise-Dydime Lépine, the Métis turned back McDougall's party near the United States border and forced them to retreat to Pembina, Dakota Territory.
Ambroise-Dydime Lépine (18 March 1840 – 8 June 1923) was a military leader of the Métis under the command of Louis Riel during the Red River Rebellion of 1869-1870.

John Stoughton Dennis

J. Stoughton DennisJohn Dennis
Headed by Colonel John Stoughton Dennis, the survey party arrived at Fort Garry on August 20, 1869.
Dennis is noted for his role in precipitating the Red River Rebellion by his 1869 surveys of the Red River Colony.

Assiniboia

District of AssiniboiaProvisional District of AssiniboiaAssiniboia Club
Catholic Bishop Taché, the Anglican bishop of Rupert's land Robert Machray, and the HBC governor of Assiniboia William Mactavish all warned the federal government that such surveys would precipitate unrest.
This, and the arrival of Canadian surveyors, led to the Red River Rebellion, in which a Provisional Government and Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia was established by Métis leader Louis Riel to negotiate the admission of the District as a province of Canada.

Pembina, North Dakota

PembinaFort PembinaPembina, ND
On November 2 under the command of Ambroise-Dydime Lépine, the Métis turned back McDougall's party near the United States border and forced them to retreat to Pembina, Dakota Territory.
the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC), the Red River Colony, Battle of Seven Oaks, the Red River Rebellion, Assiniboia, and Manitoba.

Canadian Party

It was loosely organized as the Canadian Party and led by Dr. John Christian Schultz and Charles Mair.
Members of the Canadian Party engaged in military skirmishes with Riel's provisional government during the Red River Rebellion of 1869-70.

Jean-Baptiste Thibault

Abbé Thibault
He dispatched the Abbé Jean-Baptiste Thibault and Charles-René d'Irumberry de Salaberry on a mission of reconciliation, but failed to give them the authority to negotiate on behalf of the Government.
Jean-Baptiste Thibault (14 December 1810 – 4 April 1879) was a Roman Catholic priest and missionary noted for his role in negotiating on behalf of the Government of Canada during the Red River Rebellion of 1869–1870.

John Christian Schultz

John Schultz
It was loosely organized as the Canadian Party and led by Dr. John Christian Schultz and Charles Mair.
During the Red River Rebellion of 1869–70, Schultz emerged as one of the leading opponents of Louis Riel's provisional government (which was supported by most of the area's population).

Garnet Wolseley, 1st Viscount Wolseley

Garnet WolseleySir Garnet WolseleyLord Wolseley
Now known as the Wolseley Expedition (or Red River Expedition), it consisted of Canadian militia and British regular soldiers led by Colonel Garnet Wolseley.

North-West Rebellion

Northwest RebellionRiel RebellionNorth West Rebellion
He returned to Canada in 1885 to lead the ill-fated North-West Rebellion.
After the Red River Rebellion of 1869–1870, many of the Métis moved from Manitoba to the Fort Carlton region of the Northwest Territories, where they founded the Southbranch settlements of Fish Creek, Batoche, St. Laurent, St. Louis, and Duck Lake on or near the South Saskatchewan River.

Fort Garry

Upper Fort GarryForts Rouge, Garry, and GibraltarForts Rouge, Garry, and Gibraltar National Historic Site of Canada
Headed by Colonel John Stoughton Dennis, the survey party arrived at Fort Garry on August 20, 1869. Riel peacefully withdrew from Fort Garry the day the troops arrived.
In late 1869 and early 1870, the fort was seized by Louis Riel and his Métis followers during the Red River Rebellion.

Charles Arkoll Boulton

Boulton, Charles A.Charles BoultonBoulton, Charles Arkoll
Colonel Dennis and Major Charles Boulton also supported it.
Charles Arkoll Boulton (April 17, 1841 – May 15, 1899) is noted for his role in the Red River and North-West Rebellions.

Joseph-Noël Ritchot

Father Noël-Joseph Ritchot
Following the preparation of a final list of rights, which included new demands such as a general amnesty for all members of the provisional government and provisions for separate francophone schools, delegates Abbé Joseph-Noël Ritchot, Judge John Black and Alfred Henry Scott departed for Ottawa on March 23 and 24.
Father Joseph-Noël Ritchot (25 December 1825 – 16 March 1905), commonly known as Father Noël-Joseph Ritchot, was a Roman Catholic priest noted for his role in negotiating with the Government of Canada on behalf of the Métis during the Red River Rebellion of 1869–1870.

Council of Assiniboia

Because the Hudson's Bay Company's Council of Assiniboia still had authority over the area, its representatives summoned Riel on October 25 to explain the actions of the committee.
The Council of Assiniboia was replaced by the short lived Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia after the Red River Rebellion.

George Taylor Denison III

George T. DenisonDenison, George Taylor III
Assisted by George Taylor Denison III, they immediately set about inflaming anti-Métis and anti-Catholic sentiment in the editorial pages of the Ontario press over the execution of Scott.
Owing to his dissatisfaction with the conduct of the Conservative ministry during the Red River Rebellion in 1869-70, he abandoned that party, and in 1872 unsuccessfully contested Algoma in the Liberal interest.