A report on Redwing

Head of T. i. coburni in Iceland
Egg, Collection Museum Wiesbaden
Nests are often constructed on the ground.
A spectrogram showing an example of the song structure of a Redwing in Iceland. Terminology is applied.

Bird in the thrush family, Turdidae, native to Europe and the Palearctic, slightly smaller than the related song thrush.

- Redwing

6 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Song thrush

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Thrush that breeds across the West Palearctic.

Thrush that breeds across the West Palearctic.

A parent feeding chicks in their nest in a New Zealand garden
A Song Thrush in Germany
In flight
Juvenile in New Zealand
Juvenile in a forest near Dombaih, Russia (Caucasus Mountains)
Three eggs in a nest
Broken shells of grove snails on an 'anvil'
In New Zealand
Song thrush in Slovenia

The most similar European thrush species is the redwing (T. iliacus), but that bird has a strong white supercilium, red flanks, and shows a red underwing in flight.

Fieldfare

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Member of the thrush family Turdidae.

Member of the thrush family Turdidae.

Fieldfares in winter
Berries form an important part of the winter diet
Fieldfare eating worms
Fieldfare in front of the window
Eggs, Collection Museum Wiesbaden, Germany
thumb|left|Nest and chicks

Migrating birds and wintering birds often form large flocks, often in the company of redwings.

Mistle thrush

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Bird common to much of Europe, temperate Asia and North Africa.

Bird common to much of Europe, temperate Asia and North Africa.

In Kazakhstan
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Male (left) passing earthworms to female on nest
The mistle thrush derives its English and scientific names from mistletoe, a favourite food.
A castor bean tick swollen with the blood of its host
Mistle Thrush and Alpine Chough by Giovanni da Udine

It forages within its breeding habitat and in open fields, sometimes sharing these feeding areas with redwings or fieldfares.

Red-winged blackbird

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Passerine bird of the family Icteridae found in most of North America and much of Central America.

Passerine bird of the family Icteridae found in most of North America and much of Central America.

Male seen from behind, showing the absence of the typical yellow bands below the red spots
Male displaying his characteristic predominantly black plumage with the red spot on the wing bordered by the yellow band
The golden coloration on the wing of the female red-winged blackbird
Wing feathers
The "perched display", with wings held away from the body, is an agonistic behavior of the red-winged blackbird.
Nest with eggs
The raccoon is one of the known predators of this species.
Male red-winged blackbird mobbing an osprey
Flock flying in the twilight
Male perched on a log
in McLean, Virginia, USA.
In Sacramento County. October 2016.
Leaving a feeder in suburban St. Louis, MO.
A red-winged blackbird clutching a rush in Point Pelee National Park.
Red-winged blackbird in spring in Oakville, Ontario.

Despite the similarities in most forms of the red-winged blackbird, in the subspecies of Mexican Plateau, A. p. gubernator, the female's veining is greatly reduced and restricted to the throat; the rest of the plumage is very dark brown, and also in a different family from the European redwing and the Old World common blackbird, which are thrushes (Turdidae).

Ring ouzel

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Mainly European member of the thrush family Turdidae.

Mainly European member of the thrush family Turdidae.

Male T. t. alpestris in Serbia
Male T. t. amicorum in Artashavan, Armenia
Breeding habitat at Stanage Edge in the English Peak District
Eggs in collection of Museum Wiesbaden
Juniper berries are a favoured winter food item.
The common buzzard is a predator of ring ouzels.

When not breeding, several birds may be loosely associated in good feeding areas, such as a fruiting tree, often with other thrushes such as song thrushes or redwings.

Sorbus aucuparia

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Species of deciduous tree or shrub in the rose family.

Species of deciduous tree or shrub in the rose family.

Inflorescence
Mountain-ashes, e.g. this one in the Vercors range, hold their fruit late in fall
Young trees, with the typical leaf form visible
Sorbus aucuparia growing with Mountain Pine in the Italian Alps
Damage caused by game
Comparison of Sorbus aucuparia fruit from an edible cultivar (left) and a roadside tree (right)
Freshly cross cut sorbus aucuparia with visible heart-wood
Freshly rip cut sorbus aucuparia with visible heart-wood

The fruit are eaten by migratory birds in winter, including Bohemian waxwing, spotted nutcracker, and redwing.