Reform Act 1867

Second Reform Act1867 Reform ActReform Act of 1867Representation of the People Act 18671867Reform Act1868Reform BillReform Bill of 1867Second Reform Act of 1867
The Representation of the People Act 1867, 30 & 31 Vict.wikipedia
322 Related Articles

Conservative Party (UK)

ConservativeConservative PartyConservatives
The overall intent was to help the Conservative Party, yet it resulted in their loss of the 1868 general election. The Adullamites, led by Robert Lowe, had already been working closely with the Conservative Party.
The widening of the electoral franchise in the nineteenth century forced the Conservative Party to popularise its approach under Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby and Benjamin Disraeli, who carried through their own expansion of the franchise with the Reform Act of 1867.

1868 United Kingdom general election

18681868 general election1868 election
The overall intent was to help the Conservative Party, yet it resulted in their loss of the 1868 general election.
The 1868 United Kingdom general election was the first after passage of the Reform Act 1867, which enfranchised many male householders, thus greatly increasing the number of men who could vote in elections in the United Kingdom.

Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury

Lord SalisburyThe Marquess of SalisburyMarquess of Salisbury
However, wealthy Conservative MP Lord Cranborne resigned his government ministry in disgust at the bill's introduction.
Lord Robert Cecil was first elected to the House of Commons in 1854 and served as Secretary of State for India in Lord Derby's Conservative government from 1866 until his resignation in 1867 over its introduction of Benjamin Disraeli's Reform Bill that extended the suffrage to working-class men.

Liberal Party (UK)

LiberalLiberal PartyLiberals
Lord John Russell, who in 1861 became the first Earl Russell, attempted this in 1860; but the Prime Minister, Lord Palmerston, a fellow Liberal, was against any further electoral reform.
After a brief Conservative government (during which the Second Reform Act was passed by agreement between the parties), Gladstone won a huge victory at the 1868 election and formed the first Liberal government.

Reform League

Hyde Park demonstrationHyde Park Riotsriot
The Reform League, agitating for universal suffrage, became much more active, and organized demonstrations of hundreds of thousands of people in Manchester, Glasgow, and other towns.
It collaborated with the more moderate and middle class Reform Union and gave strong support to the abortive Reform Bill 1866 and the successful Reform Act 1867.

Representation of the People (Scotland) Act 1868

18681868 Act1868 Scottish Reform Bill
Seven English boroughs were disenfranchised by the Representation of the People (Scotland) Act 1868 the subsequent year:
It carried on from the Representation of the People Act 1867, and created seven additional Scottish seats in the House of Commons at the expense of seven English borough constituencies, which were disenfranchised.

Walter Bagehot

BagehotBagehot Fellow
Influential commentators included Walter Bagehot, Thomas Carlyle, Anthony Trollope, Karl Marx and John Stuart Mill.
It appeared at the same time that Parliament enacted the Reform Act of 1867, requiring Bagehot to write an extended introduction to the second edition which appeared in 1872.

Parliament of the United Kingdom

ParliamentUK ParliamentBritish Parliament
It received Royal Assent by the British Crown on August 15, 1867, following its passage by UK Parliament to take enactment in stages over the next couple of years, culminating in full enactment on January 1, 1869.
Under the Representation of the People Act 1867 Parliament can now continue for as long as it would otherwise have done in the event of the death of the Sovereign.

List of Acts of Parliament in the United Kingdom

British legislation
c. 102 (known informally as the Reform Act of 1867 or the Second Reform Act) was a piece of British legislation that enfranchised part of the urban male working class in England and Wales for the first time.
Representation of the People Act (1867, 1884, 1918, 1928, 1949, 1969, 1983, 1985, 1989, 1990, 2000)

Adullamites

AdullamiteAdullamite Cavedissident Liberals
When it came to the vote, however, this bill split the Liberal Party: a split partly engineered by Benjamin Disraeli, who incited those threatened by the bill to rise up against it. On one side were the reactionary conservative Liberals, known as the Adullamites; on the other were pro-reform Liberals who supported the Government.
This led to the formation of Derby's 3rd Conservative Minority Administration - who, ultimately, proposed their own reform bill.

House of Commons of the United Kingdom

House of CommonsCommonsparliamentary
Thanks to manoeuvring by Disraeli, Derby's Conservatives saw an opportunity to be a strong, viable party of government; however, there was still a Liberal majority in the House of Commons.
The Reform Act 1867 lowered property requirements for voting in the boroughs, reduced the representation of the less populous boroughs, and granted parliamentary seats to several growing industrial towns.

Thomas Carlyle

CarlyleCarlyle, ThomasCarlyles
Influential commentators included Walter Bagehot, Thomas Carlyle, Anthony Trollope, Karl Marx and John Stuart Mill.
Similar hard-line views were expressed in Shooting Niagara, and After?, written after the passing of the Electoral Reform Act of 1867 in which he "reaffirmed his belief in wise leadership (and wise followership), his disbelief in democracy and his hatred of all workmanship – from brickmaking to diplomacy – that was not genuine".

William Ewart Gladstone

GladstoneWilliam GladstoneW. E. Gladstone
Consequently, the bill was more far-reaching than any Members of Parliament had thought possible or really wanted; Disraeli appeared to accept most reform proposals, so long as they did not come from William Ewart Gladstone.
Russell & Gladstone (now the senior Liberal in the House of Commons) attempted to pass a reform bill, which was defeated in the Commons because the "Adullamite" Whigs, led by Robert Lowe, refused to support it. The Conservatives then formed a ministry, in which after long Parliamentary debate Disraeli passed the Second Reform Act of 1867; Gladstone's proposed bill had been totally outmanoeuvred; he stormed into the Chamber, but too late to see his arch-enemy pass the bill.

Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby

Lord DerbyEarl of DerbyLord Stanley
The Conservatives formed a ministry on 26 June 1866, led by Lord Derby as Prime Minister and Disraeli as Chancellor of the Exchequer.
This administration was particularly notable for the passage of the Reform Act 1867, which greatly expanded the suffrage but which provoked the resignation of three cabinet ministers including the Secretary for India and three-time future Prime Minister, Lord Cranborne (later Lord Salisbury).

Chartism

ChartistChartistsChartist movement
six demands of the Chartist movement.
It was not until 1867 that urban working men were admitted to the franchise under the Reform Act 1867, and not until 1918 that full manhood suffrage was achieved.

Lymington

BucklandLymington, HampshireEast Hill
Lymington, Hampshire
Its representation was reduced to one member under the Second Reform Act of 1867, and it was subsumed into the New Forest Division under the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885.

Reform Act 1832

Reform ActReform BillReform Act of 1832
For the decades after the Great Reform Act of 1832, cabinets (in that era leading from both Houses) had resisted attempts to push through further reform, and in particular left unfulfilled the
However, no proposal was successful until 1867, when Parliament adopted the Second Reform Act.

Robert Lowe

LoweMr. L.peerage
The Adullamites, led by Robert Lowe, had already been working closely with the Conservative Party.
However Benjamin Disraeli who led the subsequent Conservative government proposed his own Reform Bill, which by splitting the parties succeeded to become the Reform Act 1867.

Birmingham

Birmingham, EnglandCity of BirminghamBirmingham, United Kingdom
Birmingham, Leeds, Liverpool and Manchester now had three MPs instead of two.
This reputation for having "shaken the fabric of privilege to its base" in 1832 led John Bright to make Birmingham the platform for his successful campaign for the Second Reform Act of 1867, which extended voting rights to the urban working class.

Chelsea (UK Parliament constituency)

ChelseaKensington and Chelsea, ChelseaChelsea constituency
Chelsea, Middlesex
The constituency was created by the Reform Act 1867 for the 1868 general election, when it returned two Members of Parliament (MPs), elected by the bloc vote system of election.

Hackney (UK Parliament constituency)

HackneyHackney constituencyHackney's MPs
Hackney, Middlesex
Hackney was a two-seat constituency in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament created under the Representation of the People Act, 1867 (often termed Second Reform Act) from the former northern parishes of the Tower Hamlets constituency and abolished under the Redistribution of Seats Act, 1885 (often termed a twin Third Reform Act, with its enabling Reform Act 1884).

Lancaster (UK Parliament constituency)

LancasterLancaster (seat 1/2)Lancaster division
Lancaster (two MPs), Lancashire
Extensive bribery caused both members to be unseated on 23 April 1866, and the seat to lose its right to return a member of Parliament under the Reform Act 1867.

Redistribution of Seats Act 1885

Redistribution of Seats Act1885Redistribution of Seats Act of 1885
Redistribution of Seats Act 1885
the Reform Act 1867 applied to English and Welsh constituencies

Stalybridge

StaleyMunicipal Borough of StalybridgeStalybridge Municipal Borough
Stalybridge, Cheshire
Between the passing of the Second Reform Act in 1867, and the general election of 1918, the town was represented in its own right through the Stalybridge Borough constituency.

Representation of the People Act 1884

Third Reform Act18841884 Reform Act
Representation of the People Act 1884 (or Third Reform Act)
c. 3, also known informally as the Third Reform Act) and the Redistribution Act of the following year were laws which further extended the suffrage in Britain after the Derby Government's Reform Act 1867.