Rehoboam

King Rehoboam of JudahSolomon's heir Rehoboam, King of the Hebrews934Biblical, First king of separate JudeaKing RehoboamRoboamRoboas
Rehoboam (/ˌriːəˈboʊ.əm/ Hebrew: רְחַבְעָם‬, Rehav'am; Greek: Ροβοαμ, Rovoam; Latin: Roboam) was the fourth king of Israel according to the Hebrew Bible.wikipedia
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Kingdom of Israel (united monarchy)

Kingdom of IsraelIsraelUnited Kingdom of Israel
Rehoboam (/ˌriːəˈboʊ.əm/ Hebrew: רְחַבְעָם‬, Rehav'am; Greek: Ροβοαμ, Rovoam; Latin: Roboam) was the fourth king of Israel according to the Hebrew Bible. In the account of I Kings and II Chronicles, he was initially king of the United Monarchy of Israel, but after the ten northern tribes of Israel rebelled in 932/931 BC to form the independent Kingdom of Israel (Samaria), under the rule of Jeroboam, Rehoboam remained as king only of the Kingdom of Judah, or southern kingdom.
On the succession of Solomon's son, Rehoboam, around 930 BCE, the biblical account reports that the country split into two kingdoms: the Kingdom of Israel (including the cities of Shechem and Samaria) in the north and the Kingdom of Judah (containing Jerusalem) in the south.

Solomon

King SolomonSalomonSolomonic magic
He was a son of and the successor to Solomon, and a grandson of David.
His sins included idolatry, marrying foreign women and, ultimately, turning away from Yahweh, and they led to the kingdom's being torn in two during the reign of his son Rehoboam.

Jeroboam

Jeroboam IKing Jeroboam of IsraelBiblical, first king of Northern Kingdom
In the account of I Kings and II Chronicles, he was initially king of the United Monarchy of Israel, but after the ten northern tribes of Israel rebelled in 932/931 BC to form the independent Kingdom of Israel (Samaria), under the rule of Jeroboam, Rehoboam remained as king only of the Kingdom of Judah, or southern kingdom.
Jeroboam I (Hebrew: Yārāḇə‘ām; Ἱεροβοάμ) was the first king of the northern Kingdom of Israel after the revolt of the ten northern Israelite tribes against Rehoboam that put an end to the United Monarchy.

Kingdom of Israel (Samaria)

Kingdom of IsraelIsraelnorthern Kingdom of Israel
In the account of I Kings and II Chronicles, he was initially king of the United Monarchy of Israel, but after the ten northern tribes of Israel rebelled in 932/931 BC to form the independent Kingdom of Israel (Samaria), under the rule of Jeroboam, Rehoboam remained as king only of the Kingdom of Judah, or southern kingdom.
After the death of Solomon in about 931 BCE, all the Israelite tribes except for Judah and Benjamin (called the ten northern tribes) refused to accept Rehoboam, the son and successor of Solomon, as their king.

Kingdom of Judah

Judahking of JudahJudahite
In the account of I Kings and II Chronicles, he was initially king of the United Monarchy of Israel, but after the ten northern tribes of Israel rebelled in 932/931 BC to form the independent Kingdom of Israel (Samaria), under the rule of Jeroboam, Rehoboam remained as king only of the Kingdom of Judah, or southern kingdom.
According to the Hebrew Bible, the kingdom of Judah resulted from the break-up of the United Kingdom of Israel (1020 to about 930 BCE) after the northern tribes refused to accept Rehoboam, the son of Solomon, as their king.

Books of Kings

2 KingsKings1 Kings
In the account of I Kings and II Chronicles, he was initially king of the United Monarchy of Israel, but after the ten northern tribes of Israel rebelled in 932/931 BC to form the independent Kingdom of Israel (Samaria), under the rule of Jeroboam, Rehoboam remained as king only of the Kingdom of Judah, or southern kingdom.
As a consequence of Solomon's failure to stamp out the worship of gods other than Yahweh, the kingdom of David is split in two in the reign of his own son Rehoboam, who becomes the first to reign over the kingdom of Judah.

Tribe of Ephraim

EphraimEphraimitesEphrem
According to the Jewish Encyclopaedia, "Solomon's wisdom and power were not sufficient to prevent the rebellion of several of his border cities. Damascus under Rezon secured its independence [from] Solomon; and Jeroboam, a superintendent of works, his ambition stirred by the words of the prophet Ahijah (1 Kings xi. 29-40), fled to Egypt. Thus before the death of Solomon the apparently unified kingdom of David began to disintegrate. With Damascus independent and a powerful man of Ephraim, the most prominent of the Ten Tribes, awaiting his opportunity, the future of Solomon's kingdom became dubious".
However, on the accession of Rehoboam, David's grandson, in c. 930 BCE the northern tribes split from the House of David to form the northern Kingdom of Israel.

Naamah (wife of Solomon)

NaamahAmmonite princess
Rehoboam's mother, Naamah, was an Ammonitess, and thus one of the foreign wives whom Solomon married.
Naamah ("pleasant") was an ancient queen consort, wife of King Solomon and mother of his heir Rehoboam, according to both, and in the Hebrew Bible.

Ten Lost Tribes

lost tribes of IsraelLost TribesTen Tribes
Jeroboam and the people rebelled, with the ten northern tribes breaking away and forming a separate kingdom.
According to the Bible, the Kingdom of Israel (or Northern Kingdom) was one of the successor states to the older United Monarchy (also called the Kingdom of Israel), which came into existence in about the 930s BCE after the northern Tribes of Israel rejected Solomon's son Rehoboam as their king.

Moab

MoabiteMountains of Gilead/MoabKingdom of Moab
According to, Solomon had broken the mandate of the Torah by marrying foreign wives and being influenced by them, worshipping and building shrines to the Moabite and Ammonite gods.
At the disruption of the kingdom under the reign of Rehoboam, Moab seems to have been absorbed into the northern realm.

Shishak

Sack of Jerusalemsackedcaptured and pillaged Jerusalem
In the fifth year of Rehoboam's reign, Shishak, king of Egypt, brought a huge army and took many cities. One episode which the Bible places during the reign of Rehoboam, and which is confirmed by the records from the Bubastite Portal in Karnak and other archaeological find (without the specific mention of the name Rehoboam), is the Egyptian invasion of Judea by the Egyptian pharaoh Shoshenq I, who is identified by many with the biblical King Shishak.
In the fifth year of Rehoboam's reign (commonly dated ca. 926 BCE), Shishak swept through the Kingdom of Judah with a powerful army of 60,000 horsemen and 1,200 chariots, in support of his ally Jeroboam, the king of Israel.

Absalom

Absalom (Abishalom)Absalom's ConspiracyAbsalom's revolt
After Mahalath he married his cousin Maacah, daughter of Absalom, David's son.
says that Absalom had another daughter or granddaughter named Maacah, who later became the favorite wife of Rehoboam.

Abijah of Judah

AbijahAbiaAbijah I
His sons with Maacah were Abijah, Attai, Ziza, and Shelomith.
He was the son of Rehoboam and the grandson of Solomon.

Zaham

His sons with Mahalath were Jeush, Shemariah, and Zaham.
In the Bible, Zaham was the son of Rehoboam, king of Judah, and Abihail.

Shechem

ŠakmuSichemJacob's Well
The assembly for the coronation of Solomon's successor, Rehoboam, was called at Shechem, the one sacredly historic city within the territory of the Ten Tribes.
The city was rebuilt in the 10th century BC and was probably the capital of Ephraim (1 Kings 4). Shechem was the place appointed, after Solomon's death, for the meeting of the people of Israel and the investiture of his son Rehoboam as king; the meeting ended in the secession of the ten northern tribes, and Shechem, fortified by Jeroboam, became the capital of the new kingdom (1 Kings 12:1; 14:17; 2 Chronicles 10:1).

Judea

JudaeaJudahJudaean
One episode which the Bible places during the reign of Rehoboam, and which is confirmed by the records from the Bubastite Portal in Karnak and other archaeological find (without the specific mention of the name Rehoboam), is the Egyptian invasion of Judea by the Egyptian pharaoh Shoshenq I, who is identified by many with the biblical King Shishak.
The name originates from the Hebrew name Yehudah, a son of the Jewish patriarch Jacob/Israel, and Yehudah's progeny forming the biblical Israelite tribe of Judah (Yehudah) and later the associated Kingdom of Judah, which the 1906 Jewish Encyclopedia dates from 934 until 586 BCE.

Kings of Judah

king of JudahKingJudah
However, in about 930 BCE the united kingdom split, with ten of the twelve Tribes of Israel rejecting Solomon's son Rehoboam as their king.

Shoshenq I

ShoshenqAsychisHedjkheperre-setepenre Shoshenq I
One episode which the Bible places during the reign of Rehoboam, and which is confirmed by the records from the Bubastite Portal in Karnak and other archaeological find (without the specific mention of the name Rehoboam), is the Egyptian invasion of Judea by the Egyptian pharaoh Shoshenq I, who is identified by many with the biblical King Shishak.
According to these passages, Jeroboam fled from Solomon and stayed with Shishaq until Solomon died, and Shishaq invaded Judah, mostly the area of Benjamin, during the fifth year of the reign of Rehoboam, taking with him most of the treasures of the temple built by Solomon.

Maacah

Aram-Ma'akahMaachahMaakathite
After Mahalath he married his cousin Maacah, daughter of Absalom, David's son.
Daughter of Absalom, favorite wife of Rehoboam, mother of Abijah of Judah, and grandmother of Asa of Judah. She served as Queen Mother for Asa, until he deposed her for idolatry. (1 Kings 15:1-14, 2 Chronicles 11:20-22, 2 Chronicles 15:16)

Bubastite Portal

gate at KarnakShoshenq's topographical list
One episode which the Bible places during the reign of Rehoboam, and which is confirmed by the records from the Bubastite Portal in Karnak and other archaeological find (without the specific mention of the name Rehoboam), is the Egyptian invasion of Judea by the Egyptian pharaoh Shoshenq I, who is identified by many with the biblical King Shishak.
In the fifth year of King Rehoboam, because they had been unfaithful to the LORD, Shishaq king of Egypt came up against Jerusalem with 1,200 chariots and 60,000 horsemen.

Hebrew Bible

biblicalBibleHebrew
Rehoboam (/ˌriːəˈboʊ.əm/ Hebrew: רְחַבְעָם‬, Rehav'am; Greek: Ροβοαμ, Rovoam; Latin: Roboam) was the fourth king of Israel according to the Hebrew Bible.

Books of Chronicles

1 ChroniclesChronicles2 Chronicles
In the account of I Kings and II Chronicles, he was initially king of the United Monarchy of Israel, but after the ten northern tribes of Israel rebelled in 932/931 BC to form the independent Kingdom of Israel (Samaria), under the rule of Jeroboam, Rehoboam remained as king only of the Kingdom of Judah, or southern kingdom.

The Jewish Encyclopedia

jewishencyclopedia.comJewish Encyclopædia1901–1906 Jewish Encyclopedia
According to the Jewish Encyclopaedia, "Solomon's wisdom and power were not sufficient to prevent the rebellion of several of his border cities. Damascus under Rezon secured its independence [from] Solomon; and Jeroboam, a superintendent of works, his ambition stirred by the words of the prophet Ahijah (1 Kings xi. 29-40), fled to Egypt. Thus before the death of Solomon the apparently unified kingdom of David began to disintegrate. With Damascus independent and a powerful man of Ephraim, the most prominent of the Ten Tribes, awaiting his opportunity, the future of Solomon's kingdom became dubious".

Aram-Damascus

AramDamascusAramean
According to the Jewish Encyclopaedia, "Solomon's wisdom and power were not sufficient to prevent the rebellion of several of his border cities. Damascus under Rezon secured its independence [from] Solomon; and Jeroboam, a superintendent of works, his ambition stirred by the words of the prophet Ahijah (1 Kings xi. 29-40), fled to Egypt. Thus before the death of Solomon the apparently unified kingdom of David began to disintegrate. With Damascus independent and a powerful man of Ephraim, the most prominent of the Ten Tribes, awaiting his opportunity, the future of Solomon's kingdom became dubious".

Rezon the Syrian

RezonEzronRezon I
According to the Jewish Encyclopaedia, "Solomon's wisdom and power were not sufficient to prevent the rebellion of several of his border cities. Damascus under Rezon secured its independence [from] Solomon; and Jeroboam, a superintendent of works, his ambition stirred by the words of the prophet Ahijah (1 Kings xi. 29-40), fled to Egypt. Thus before the death of Solomon the apparently unified kingdom of David began to disintegrate. With Damascus independent and a powerful man of Ephraim, the most prominent of the Ten Tribes, awaiting his opportunity, the future of Solomon's kingdom became dubious".