Reims

RheimsReims, FranceDurocortorumRheims, FranceSaint Rémi of Reims Basilica Rheimscoronation at ReimsCounty of ReimsDurocortumFrench city of its same name
Reims (, also, ; also spelled Rheims in English; Riemen) is the most populous city in the Marne department, in the Grand Est region of France.wikipedia
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Vesle

Vesle RiverRiver Vesle
Its primary river, the Vesle, is a tributary of the Aisne.
The Vesle is the river on which the city of Reims stands.

Reims Cathedral

Cathedral of ReimsNotre-Dame de ReimsReims
The royal anointing was performed at the Cathedral of Reims, which housed the Holy Ampulla of chrism allegedly brought by a white dove at the baptism of Frankish king Clovis I in 496. Reims Cathedral is an example of French Gothic architecture.
Notre-Dame de Reims (meaning "Our Lady of Reims"), known in English as Reims Cathedral, is a Roman Catholic cathedral in the French city of its same name.

Marne (department)

MarneMarne department51
Reims (, also, ; also spelled Rheims in English; Riemen) is the most populous city in the Marne department, in the Grand Est region of France.
The subprefectures are Épernay, Reims, and Vitry-le-François.

Palace of Tau

Palais du TauPalace of Tau, ReimsPalais de Tau
The Cathedral, the Palace of Tau and the former Abbey of Saint-Remi have been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1991.
The Palace of Tau (Palais du Tau) in Reims, France, was the palace of the Archbishop of Reims.

Grand Est

Grand-EstAlsace-Champagne-Ardenne-LorraineGrand Est Region
Reims (, also, ; also spelled Rheims in English; Riemen) is the most populous city in the Marne department, in the Grand Est region of France.
The city of Reims (in Champagne), where Frankish king Clovis I had been baptized in 496 AD, would later play a prominent ceremonial role in French monarchical history as the traditional site of the coronation of the kings of France.

History of France

French historyFranceFrench
Reims later played a prominent ceremonial role in French monarchical history as the traditional site of the coronation of the kings of France.
Under Frankish inheritance traditions, all sons inherit part of the land, so four kingdoms emerged: centered on Paris, Orléans, Soissons, and Rheims.

Nicasius of Rheims

Saint NicasiusBishop NicasiusNicasius
The consul Jovinus, an influential supporter of the new faith, repelled the Alamanni who invaded Champagne in 336; but the Vandals captured the city in 406 and slew Bishop Nicasius; and in 451 Attila the Hun put Reims to fire and sword.
He founded the first cathedral in Rheims and is the patron saint of smallpox victims.

Louis IV of France

Louis IVKing Louis IVLouis IV, King of France
King Louis IV gave the city and countship of Reims to the archbishop Artaldus in 940.
Louis was born in the heartlands of West Francia's Carolingian lands between Laon and Reims in 920 or 921.

Joan of Arc

Jeanne d'ArcSaint Joan of ArcSt. Joan of Arc
The Treaty of Troyes (1420) ceded it to the English, who had made a futile attempt to take it by siege in 1360; but French patriots expelled them on the approach of Joan of Arc, who in 1429 had Charles VII consecrated in the cathedral.
Several additional swift victories led to Charles VII's consecration at Reims.

Charles VII of France

Charles VIICharlesKing Charles VII
The Treaty of Troyes (1420) ceded it to the English, who had made a futile attempt to take it by siege in 1360; but French patriots expelled them on the approach of Joan of Arc, who in 1429 had Charles VII consecrated in the cathedral.
Forces of the Kingdom of England and the Duchy of Burgundy occupied Guyenne and northern France, including Paris, the most populous city, and Reims, the city in which the French kings were traditionally crowned.

Philip II of France

Philip AugustusPhilip IIPhilip II Augustus
The archbishops held the important prerogative of the consecration of the kings of France – a privilege which they exercised (except in a few cases) from the time of Philippe II Augustus (anointed 1179, reigned 1180–1223) to that of Charles X (anointed 1825).
In declining health, Louis VII had his 14-year-old son crowned and anointed as king at Reims on 1 November 1179 by Archbishop William of the White Hands.

Holy Ampulla

Sainte Ampoule
The royal anointing was performed at the Cathedral of Reims, which housed the Holy Ampulla of chrism allegedly brought by a white dove at the baptism of Frankish king Clovis I in 496.
The ampoule, a vial of Roman glass about 1½ inches tall, came to light at Reims in time for the coronation of Louis VII in 1131.

Grande Semaine d'Aviation de la Champagne

Grande Semaine d'AviationReims aviation meetingRheims
In August 1909 Reims hosted the first international aviation meet, the Grande Semaine d'Aviation de la Champagne.
The Grande Semaine d'Aviation de la Champagne was an 8-day aviation meeting held near Reims in France in 1909, so-named because it was sponsored by the major local champagne growers.

Hôtel de Ville, Reims

Hôtel de VilleHôtel-de-villetown hall
The construction of the Hôtel de Ville dates back to the same century.
The Hôtel de ville is the town hall in the French city of Reims.

Remi

Saint Remi
Before the Roman conquest of northern Gaul, Reims had served as the Remi tribe's capital, founded circa 80 BC.
Their capital was at Durocortum (Reims, France) the second largest oppidum of Gaul, on the Vesle.

Coronation

crownedaccessioncoronations
Reims later played a prominent ceremonial role in French monarchical history as the traditional site of the coronation of the kings of France.
The anointing served as a reminder of the baptism of Clovis I in Reims in 496, where the ceremony was finally transferred in 816.

Place Royale, Reims

Place Royale
The Place Royale was built in the 18th century.
Place Royale (, meaning "Royal Square") is a square in Reims, France.

Louis the Pious

Louis ILouisLouis I the Pious
Meetings of Pope Stephen II (752–757) with Pepin the Short, and of Pope Leo III (795–816) with Charlemagne (died 814), took place at Reims; and here Pope Stephen IV crowned Louis the Debonnaire in 816.
In 816, Pope Stephen IV, who had succeeded Leo III, visited Reims and again crowned Louis (Sunday 5 October).

Louis Paulhan

Major aviation personages such as Glenn Curtiss, Louis Blériot and Louis Paulhan participated.
He took part in many airshows, including one in Douai in July 1909, where he set new records for altitude (150 m) and duration (1h 07m), covering 47 km, and the Grande Semaine d'Aviation in Rheims where he crashed.

Karl Dönitz

Admiral DönitzDönitzKarl Donitz
General Alfred Jodl, German Chief-of-Staff, signed the surrender at the Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force (SHAEF) as the representative for German President Karl Dönitz.
On 7 May 1945, he ordered Alfred Jodl, Chief of Operations Staff of the OKW, to sign the German instruments of surrender in Reims, France.

French Gothic architecture

French GothicFrenchFrench Gothic style
Reims Cathedral is an example of French Gothic architecture.
During the reign of Louis VI of France (1081–1137), Paris was the principal residence of the Kings of France, Reims the place of coronation, and the Abbey of Saint-Denis became their ceremonial burial place.

Basilica of Saint-Remi

Saint Remi BasilicaSaint Rémi Basilica
The Basilica of Saint-Remi, founded in the 11th century "over the chapel of St. Christophe where St. Remi was buried", is "the largest Romanesque church in northern France, though with later additions."
The Basilica of Saint-Remi (Basilique Saint-Remi) is a medieval abbey church in Reims, France (rue Simon).

Châlons-en-Champagne

Châlons-sur-MarneChâlonsChalons-sur-Marne
On 30 October 1908, Henri Farman made the first cross-country flight from Châlons to Reims.
It is the capital of the department of Marne, despite being only a quarter the size of the city of Reims.

Attila

Attila the HunEtzelAtilla the Hun
The consul Jovinus, an influential supporter of the new faith, repelled the Alamanni who invaded Champagne in 336; but the Vandals captured the city in 406 and slew Bishop Nicasius; and in 451 Attila the Hun put Reims to fire and sword.
Other cities attacked can be determined by the hagiographic vitae written to commemorate their bishops: Nicasius was slaughtered before the altar of his church in Rheims; Servatus is alleged to have saved Tongeren with his prayers, as Saint Genevieve is said to have saved Paris.

Protestant Church of Reims

Temple protestant de Reims
The Protestant Church of Reims, built in 1921–1923 over designs by Charles Letrosne, is an example of flamboyant neo-Gothic architecture.
The Protestant Church of Reims (Temple protestant de Reims) is a large Protestant church in Reims, France, built in 1921–1923 to replace an earlier building that had been destroyed during World War I (1914–1918).