Renaissance Latin

Humanist LatinLatinRenaissancehumanistic LatinLatinityNeo-LatinRenaissance (or Humanist) LatinRenaissance Latinitywas inaugurated
Renaissance Latin is a name given to the distinctive form of Latin style developed during the European Renaissance of the fourteenth to fifteenth centuries, particularly by the Renaissance humanism movement.wikipedia
99 Related Articles

Renaissance

the RenaissanceEarly RenaissanceEuropean Renaissance
Renaissance Latin is a name given to the distinctive form of Latin style developed during the European Renaissance of the fourteenth to fifteenth centuries, particularly by the Renaissance humanism movement.
As a cultural movement, the Renaissance encompassed innovative flowering of Latin and vernacular literatures, beginning with the 14th-century resurgence of learning based on classical sources, which contemporaries credited to Petrarch; the development of linear perspective and other techniques of rendering a more natural reality in painting; and gradual but widespread educational reform.

Latin

Latin languageLat.la
Renaissance Latin is a name given to the distinctive form of Latin style developed during the European Renaissance of the fourteenth to fifteenth centuries, particularly by the Renaissance humanism movement.
Medieval Latin was used as a literary language from the 9th century to the Renaissance which used Renaissance Latin.

Renaissance humanism

humanistRenaissance humanisthumanists
Renaissance Latin is a name given to the distinctive form of Latin style developed during the European Renaissance of the fourteenth to fifteenth centuries, particularly by the Renaissance humanism movement.

Medieval Latin

LatinMiddle LatinMediaeval Latin
Ad fontes ("to the sources") was the general cry of the Renaissance humanists, and as such their Latin style sought to purge Latin of the medieval Latin vocabulary and stylistic accretions that it had acquired in the centuries after the fall of the Roman Empire.

New Latin

Neo-LatinModern LatinLatin
Renaissance Latin gradually developed into the New Latin of the 16th–19th centuries, used as the language of choice for authors discussing subjects considered sufficiently important to merit an international (i.e., pan-European) audience.
New Latin was inaugurated by the triumph of the humanist reform of Latin education, led by such writers as Erasmus, More, and Colet.

Sequence (musical form)

sequencesequencesSequentia
They abandoned the use of the sequence and other accentual forms of metre, and sought instead to revive the Greek formats that were used in Latin poetry during the Roman period.
The composition of sequences became less frequent when Humanist Latin replaced medieval Latin as the preferred literary style in Latin.

Poliziano

Angelo PolizianoAgnolo PolizianoPolitian
His scholarship was instrumental in the divergence of Renaissance (or Humanist) Latin from medieval norms and for developments in philology.

Fiore dei Liberi

Fior di BattagliaFlower of Battle
It consists of 36 folia and possesses two different prologues, one in Renaissance Latin and one in Italian.

Ad fontes

original meaning
Ad fontes ("to the sources") was the general cry of the Renaissance humanists, and as such their Latin style sought to purge Latin of the medieval Latin vocabulary and stylistic accretions that it had acquired in the centuries after the fall of the Roman Empire.

Fall of the Western Roman Empire

decline of the Roman Empirefall of Romefall of the Roman Empire
Ad fontes ("to the sources") was the general cry of the Renaissance humanists, and as such their Latin style sought to purge Latin of the medieval Latin vocabulary and stylistic accretions that it had acquired in the centuries after the fall of the Roman Empire.

Cicero

Marcus Tullius CiceroCiceronianTully
They looked to golden age Latin literature, and especially to Cicero in prose and Virgil in poetry, as the arbiters of Latin style.

Prose

Fictional proseprosaistprosaic
They looked to golden age Latin literature, and especially to Cicero in prose and Virgil in poetry, as the arbiters of Latin style.

Virgil

VergilPublius Vergilius MaroVirgilian
They looked to golden age Latin literature, and especially to Cicero in prose and Virgil in poetry, as the arbiters of Latin style.

Poetry

poempoetpoems
They looked to golden age Latin literature, and especially to Cicero in prose and Virgil in poetry, as the arbiters of Latin style.

Metre (poetry)

metremeterprosody
They abandoned the use of the sequence and other accentual forms of metre, and sought instead to revive the Greek formats that were used in Latin poetry during the Roman period.

Latin poetry

LatinLatin versepoet
They abandoned the use of the sequence and other accentual forms of metre, and sought instead to revive the Greek formats that were used in Latin poetry during the Roman period.

High Middle Ages

high medievalHighhigh medieval period
The humanists condemned the large body of medieval Latin literature as "Gothic"—for them, a term of abuse—and believed instead that only ancient Latin from the Roman period was "real Latin".

Classical Latin

LatinistLatinclassical
The humanists condemned the large body of medieval Latin literature as "Gothic"—for them, a term of abuse—and believed instead that only ancient Latin from the Roman period was "real Latin".

Orthography

orthographicorthographiesorthographically
Some 16th-century Ciceronian humanists also sought to purge written Latin of medieval developments in its orthography.

Palatalization (sound change)

palatalizationpalatalizedpalatalisation
They were much more zealous than medieval Latin writers that t and c be distinguished; because the effects of palatalization made them homophones, medieval scribes often wrote, for example, eciam for etiam.

Homophone

homophoneshomophonoushomophonic
They were much more zealous than medieval Latin writers that t and c be distinguished; because the effects of palatalization made them homophones, medieval scribes often wrote, for example, eciam for etiam.

Handwriting

handwrittenhandshand
Their reforms even affected handwriting; Humanists usually wrote Latin in a humanist minuscule script derived from Carolingian minuscule, the ultimate ancestor of most contemporary lower-case typefaces, avoiding the black-letter scripts used in the Middle Ages.

Humanist minuscule

Humanistcursive Humanist minusculehumanistic minuscule
Their reforms even affected handwriting; Humanists usually wrote Latin in a humanist minuscule script derived from Carolingian minuscule, the ultimate ancestor of most contemporary lower-case typefaces, avoiding the black-letter scripts used in the Middle Ages.

Carolingian minuscule

CarolingianminusculeCaroline script
Their reforms even affected handwriting; Humanists usually wrote Latin in a humanist minuscule script derived from Carolingian minuscule, the ultimate ancestor of most contemporary lower-case typefaces, avoiding the black-letter scripts used in the Middle Ages.