Renaissance architecture

RenaissanceRenaissance styleItalian RenaissanceItalian Renaissance architectureRenaissance-styleRenaissance architectManneristarchitectureRenaissance architectural styleItalian Renaissance style
Renaissance architecture is the European architecture of the period between the early 14th and early 16th centuries in different regions, demonstrating a conscious revival and development of certain elements of ancient Greek and Roman thought and material culture.wikipedia
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Gothic architecture

GothicGothic styleLate Gothic
Stylistically, Renaissance architecture followed Gothic architecture and was succeeded by Baroque architecture. Orderly arrangements of columns, pilasters and lintels, as well as the use of semicircular arches, hemispherical domes, niches and aedicula replaced the more complex proportional systems and irregular profiles of medieval buildings.
It evolved from Romanesque architecture and was succeeded by Renaissance architecture.

Baroque architecture

BaroqueBaroque styleLate Baroque
Stylistically, Renaissance architecture followed Gothic architecture and was succeeded by Baroque architecture.
Baroque architects took the basic elements of Renaissance architecture, including domes and colonnades, and made them higher, grander, more decorated, and more dramatic.

Dome

domesfalse domesaucer dome
Orderly arrangements of columns, pilasters and lintels, as well as the use of semicircular arches, hemispherical domes, niches and aedicula replaced the more complex proportional systems and irregular profiles of medieval buildings.
The Renaissance architectural style spread from Italy in the Early modern period.

Italian Renaissance

Renaissance ItalyRenaissanceFlorentine Renaissance
Although the term Renaissance was used first by the French historian Jules Michelet, it was given its more lasting definition from the Swiss historian Jacob Burckhardt, whose book, Die Kultur der Renaissance in Italien 1860, The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy, 1860, English translation, by SGC Middlemore, in 2 vols., London, 1878) was influential in the development of the modern interpretation of the Italian Renaissance.
The Italian Renaissance is best known for its achievements in painting, architecture, sculpture, literature, music, philosophy, science and technology, and exploration.

Turin

TorinoTurin, ItalyTorino, Italy
The large towns of Northern Italy were prosperous through trade with the rest of Europe, Genoa providing a seaport for the goods of France and Spain; Milan and Turin being centres of overland trade, and maintaining substantial metalworking industries.
Turin is well known for its Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Neo-classical, and Art Nouveau architecture.

Ospedale degli Innocenti

Spedale degli InnocentiHospital of the InnocentsFoundling Hospital
This led to the building of structures such as Brunelleschi's Hospital of the Innocents with its elegant colonnade forming a link between the charitable building and the public square, and the Laurentian Library where the collection of books established by the Medici family could be consulted by scholars.
It is regarded as a notable example of early Italian Renaissance architecture.

Column

columnspillarpillars
Orderly arrangements of columns, pilasters and lintels, as well as the use of semicircular arches, hemispherical domes, niches and aedicula replaced the more complex proportional systems and irregular profiles of medieval buildings.
Renaissance architecture was keen to revive the classical vocabulary and styles, and the informed use and variation of the classical orders remained fundamental to the training of architects throughout Baroque, Rococo and Neo-classical architecture.

Rustication (architecture)

rusticatedrusticationrusticated ashlar
Basements and ground floors were often rusticated, as at the Palazzo Medici Riccardi (1444–1460) in Florence.
Rustication was used in ancient times, but became especially popular in the revived classical styles of Italian Renaissance architecture and that of subsequent periods, above all in the lower floors of secular buildings.

Naples

Naples, ItalyNapoliNeapolitan
In the 15th century, Florence, Venice and Naples extended their power through much of the area that surrounded them, making the movement of artists possible.
The most prominent forms of architecture visible in present-day Naples are the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque styles.

Santo Spirito, Florence

Santo SpiritoBasilica di Santo SpiritoBasilica of Santa Maria del Santo Spirito
The new architectural philosophy of the Renaissance is best demonstrated in the churches of San Lorenzo, and Santo Spirito in Florence.
The interior of the building - internal length 97 meters - is one of the preeminent examples of Renaissance architecture.

Sagrestia Vecchia

Old SacristyOld Sacristy of the Basilica of San Lorenzo in Florence
One of the first buildings to use pilasters as an integrated system was in the Old Sacristy (1421–1440) by Brunelleschi.
It is one of the most important monuments of the early Italian Renaissance architecture.

Palazzo Rucellai

Rucellai PalaceInstitute at Palazzo RucellaiItalian Palazzo
An early and much copied prototype was the façade for the Palazzo Rucellai (1446 and 1451) in Florence with its three registers of pilasters
Its splendid facade was one of the first to proclaim the new ideas of Renaissance architecture based on the use of pilasters and entablatures in proportional relationship to each other.

Palazzo dei Diamanti

Pinacoteca NazionalePinacoteca Nazionale di FerraraFerrara Pinacothek
Ferrara, under the Este, was expanded in the late 15th century, with several new palaces being built such as the Palazzo dei Diamanti and Palazzo Schifanoia for Borso d'Este.
Palazzo dei Diamanti is a Renaissance palace located on Corso Ercole I d'Este 21 in Ferrara, region of Emilia Romagna, Italy.

Venetian Renaissance architecture

RenaissanceVenetian RenaissanceRenaissance palace
Venetian Renaissance architecture developed a particularly distinct character because of local conditions.
Compared to the Renaissance architecture of other Italian cities, there was a degree of conservatism, especially in retaining the overall form of buildings, which in the city were usually replacements on a confined site, and in windows, where arched or round tops, sometimes with a classicized version of the tracery of Venetian Gothic architecture, remained far more heavily used than in other cities.

Sistine Chapel

Cappella SistinaChrist Giving the Keys to St. PeterSistine
The construction of the Sistine Chapel with its uniquely important decorations and the entire rebuilding of St. Peter's Basilica, one of Christendom's most significant churches, were part of this process.
Its exterior is unadorned by architectural or decorative details, as is common in many Italian churches of the Medieval and Renaissance eras.

Donato Bramante

BramanteBramantesqueBramante-style
The most representative architect is Donato Bramante (1444–1514), who expanded the applicability of classical architecture to contemporary buildings.
He introduced Renaissance architecture to Milan and the High Renaissance style to Rome, where his plan for St. Peter's Basilica formed the basis of design executed by Michelangelo.

Palazzo Orsini di Gravina

Palazzo Gravina Orsini di GravinaOrsini di Gravina
The most notable examples of Renaissance architecture in that city are the Cappella Caracciolo, attributed to Bramante, and the Palazzo Orsini di Gravina, built by Gabriele d'Angelo between 1513 and 1549.
The Palazzo Orsini di Gravina is a Renaissance-style palace on number 3 Via Monteoliveto, in the San Lorenzo quarter of Rione San Giuseppe-Carità, of central Naples, Italy.

Basilica of Sant'Andrea, Mantua

Sant'AndreaBasilica of Sant'AndreaBasilica di Sant'Andrea di Mantova
The first building to demonstrate this was St. Andrea in Mantua by Alberti.
It is one of the major works of 15th-century Renaissance architecture in Northern Italy.

St. Peter's Basilica

Saint Peter's BasilicaSt Peter's BasilicaSt. Peter
The construction of the Sistine Chapel with its uniquely important decorations and the entire rebuilding of St. Peter's Basilica, one of Christendom's most significant churches, were part of this process.
The Papal Basilica of St. Peter in the Vatican (Basilica Papale di San Pietro in Vaticano), or simply St. Peter's Basilica (Basilica Sancti Petri), is a church built in the Renaissance style located in Vatican City, the papal enclave which is within the city of Rome.

Basilica Palladiana

BasilicaBasilica loggiasBasilica Palladiana, Vicenza
His first major architectural commission was the rebuilding of the Basilica Palladiana at Vicenza, in the Veneto where he was to work most of his life.
The Basilica Palladiana is a Renaissance building in the central Piazza dei Signori in Vicenza, north-eastern Italy.

Rome

Rome, ItalyRomanRoma
The return of the Pope Gregory XI from Avignon in September 1377 and the resultant new emphasis on Rome as the center of Christian spirituality, brought about a boom in the building of churches in Rome such as had not taken place for nearly a thousand years.
Among others, a masterpiece of Renaissance architecture in Rome is the Piazza del Campidoglio by Michelangelo.

Andrea Palladio

PalladioPalladianPaladio
The development of the plan in secular architecture was to take place in the 16th century and culminated with the work of Palladio.
The basic elements of Italian Renaissance architecture, including Doric columns, lintels, cornices, loggias, pediments and domes had already been used in the 15th century or earlier, before Palladio.

Venice

VenetianVenice, ItalyVenezia
In the 15th century, Florence, Venice and Naples extended their power through much of the area that surrounded them, making the movement of artists possible.
Venetian taste was conservative and Renaissance architecture only really became popular in buildings from about the 1470s.

Luciano Laurana

LucianoLucijan VranjaninLuka
The Duke employed Luciano Laurana from Dalmatia, renowned for his expertise at fortification.
He considerably influenced the development of Renaissance architecture.

Doric order

DoricDoric columnsDoric column
Roman and Greek orders of columns are used: Tuscan, Doric, Ionic, Corinthian and Composite.
The most influential, and perhaps the earliest, use of the Doric in Renaissance architecture was in the circular Tempietto by Donato Bramante (1502 or later), in the courtyard of San Pietro in Montorio, Rome.