Renaissance architecture

Tempietto di San Pietro in Montorio, Rome, 1502, by Bramante. This small temple marks the place where St Peter was put to death
Temple of Vesta, Rome, 205 AD. As one of the most important temples of Ancient Rome, it became the model for Bramante's Tempietto
Palladio's engraving of Bramante's Tempietto
Plan of Bramante's Tempietto in Montorio
The Piazza del Campidoglio
The Romanesque Florence Baptistery was the object of Brunelleschi's studies of perspective
Pope Sixtus IV, 1477, builder of the Sistine Chapel. Fresco by Melozzo da Forlì in the Vatican Palace.
Four Humanist philosophers under the patronage of the Medici: Marsilio Ficino, Cristoforo Landino, Angelo Poliziano and Demetrius Chalcondyles. Fresco by Domenico Ghirlandaio.
Cosimo de' Medici the Elder, head of the Medici Bank, sponsored civic building programs. Posthumous portrait by Pontormo.
The Church of the Certosa di Pavia, Lombardy
Scuola Grande di San Marco, Venice
Raphael's unused plan for St. Peter's Basilica
Facade of Sant'Agostino, Rome, built in 1483 by Giacomo di Pietrasanta
Classical Orders, engraving from the Encyclopédie vol. 18. 18th century.
The Dome of St Peter's Basilica, Rome.
Courtyard of Palazzo Strozzi, Florence
Ospedale degli Innocenti in Florence.
The dome of Florence Cathedral (the Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore)
The church of San Lorenzo
Palazzo Medici Riccardi by Michelozzo. Florence, 1444
Basilica of Sant'Andrea, Mantua, the façade
Façade of Santa Maria Novella, 1456–70
The crossing of Santa Maria della Grazie, Milan (1490)
picture above
The Palazzo Farnese, Rome (1534–1545). Designed by Sangallo and Michelangelo.
Palazzo Pandolfini, Florence, by Raphael
Palazzo Massimo alle Colonne.
Palazzo Te, Mantua
St Peter's Basilica
The vestibule of the Laurentian Library
Il Gesù, designed by Giacomo della Porta.
Villa Capra "La Rotonda"
Keystone with a profile of a man, Palazzo Giusti, Verona, Italy
The House of the Blackheads in Riga, Latvia
Royal Summer Palace in Prague is considered the purest Renaissance architecture outside of Italy.
Cathedral of St James, Šibenik
English Renaissance: Hardwick Hall (1590–1597).
French Renaissance: Château de Chambord (1519–39)
Juleum in Helmstedt, Germany (example of Weser Renaissance)
Antwerp City Hall (finished in 1564)
Courtyard of Wawel Castle exemplifies first period of Polish Renaissance
Cloister of the Convent of Christ, Tomar, Portugal, (1557–1591), Diogo de Torralva and Filippo Terzi.
The Palace of Facets on the Cathedral Square of the Moscow Kremlin.
Nordic Renaissance: Frederiksborg Palace (1602–20)
The Escorial (1563–1584), Madrid
Cathedral Basilica of Salvador built between 1657 and 1746, a UNESCO WHS.
The large Basilica of San Francisco in Quito, built between 1535 and 1650, a UNESCO World Heritage Site city.

European architecture of the period between the early 14th and early 16th centuries in different regions, demonstrating a conscious revival and development of certain elements of ancient Greek and Roman thought and material culture.

- Renaissance architecture
Tempietto di San Pietro in Montorio, Rome, 1502, by Bramante. This small temple marks the place where St Peter was put to death

76 related topics

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Villa Cornaro

Villa Cornaro

Patrician villa in Piombino Dese, about 30 km northwest of Venice, Italy.

Patrician villa in Piombino Dese, about 30 km northwest of Venice, Italy.

Villa Cornaro
Retro
Main Hall
Ground plan by Bertotti Scamozzi, 1781

It represents one of the most exemplary illustrations of a Renaissance villa during this time frame.

Salisbury Cathedral (1220–1258) (Tower and spire later.)

English Gothic architecture

Architectural style that flourished from the late 12th until the mid-17th century.

Architectural style that flourished from the late 12th until the mid-17th century.

Salisbury Cathedral (1220–1258) (Tower and spire later.)
Salisbury Cathedral choir
Temple Church choir
Southwell Minster choir
Worcester Cathedral nave
Beverley Minster transept
York Minster south transept
Hereford Cathedral (1079–1250) Lady chapel
Peterborough Cathedral west front
Wells Cathedral west front
Wells Cathedral nave
Lincoln Cathedral nave
Worcester Cathedral choir
Winchester Cathedral Lady chapel
Lancet window, Fountains Abbey
Whitby Abbey choir
Rievaulx Abbey choir
Lanercost Priory west front
Durham Cathedral east transept
Choir of Canterbury Cathedral rebuilt by William of Sens and William the Englishman (1174–1184)
The three levels of the nave (1192–1230) of Wells Cathedral, the first in England to use pointed arches exclusively in the ceiling vaults, the windows of the clerestory and arcades of the triforium, and the arcades on the ground floor.
The Dean's Eye Window, a rare English rose window, at Lincoln Cathedral (1220–1235)
Early four-part rib vaults at Salisbury Cathedral, with a simple carved stone boss at the meeting point of the ribs (1220–1258)
Lancet windows in the north transept of Salisbury Cathedral (1220–1258)
Westminster Abbey north transept rose window
Westminster Abbey chapter house
The vault of the chapter house at Salisbury Cathedral (1275–85)
Salisbury Cathedral chapter house and cloisters
Wells Cathedral chapter house
York Minster chapter house
Chichester Cathedral Lady chapel
Wells Cathedral choir
Exeter Cathedral choir
York Minster nave
Merton College Chapel
Ripon Cathedral east end
Gisborough Priory, North Riding of Yorkshire
St Mary's Abbey, York, nave
Newstead Abbey, Nottinghamshire, west front
Southwell Minster, Nottinghamshire, chapter house
Hereford Cathedral north transept
Howden Minster, East Yorkshire, nave
Howden Minster south transept
St Augustine's Abbey, Kent, gatehouse
Hull Minster chancel
St Mary's Church, Nantwich, east end
St Andrew's Church, Heckington, nave
Ely Cathedral Lady chapel (1321–1351)
Lichfield Cathedral choir
St Botolph's Church, Boston, nave
Ely Cathedral choir
The octagon and lantern, Ely Cathedral, rebuilt following the collapse of the central tower in 1321
Wells Cathedral Lady chapel
Carlisle Cathedral choir
Prior Crauden's Chapel, Ely
Old Grammar School, Coventry, east end
Bolton Abbey choir
Walsingham Priory
Chester Cathedral south transept window
Selby Abbey choir
Church of St Mary Magdalene, Newark-on-Trent, south aisle west window
Bury St Edmunds Abbey gateway
Decorated ornament on the west porch of Lichfield Cathedral (1195–1340)
Tracery, diapering and sculptural decoration on Exeter Cathedral (1258–1400)
Early buttresses, topped by pinnacles, at Lichfield Cathedral (1195–1340)
Pinnacles on the roof of Ely Cathedral (1321–1351)
East window of Carlisle Cathedral, with curvilinear tracery (about 1350)
Floral boss joining the ribs of the vaults of Exeter Cathedral (1258–1400)
transverse arches in the aisle of Bristol Cathedral (1298–1340)
The great west window of York Minster (1338–39), featuring a motif known as the Heart of Yorkshire
Winchester Cathedral west front
St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle (1475–)
Sherborne Abbey
Eton College Chapel
Henry VII Chapel at Westminster Abbey (1503–), with Perpendicular tracery and blind panels.
New College Chapel, Oxford
Edington Priory west front: Decorated and Perpendicular
Beauchamp Chapel, Collegiate Church of St Mary, Warwick
Manchester Cathedral chancel
Hall of Christ Church, Oxford
Hull Minster nave
St Giles' Church, Wrexham
Merton College Chapel tower
Gloucester Cathedral, choir and chancel
Bath Abbey chancel
York Minster chancel, looking west
Canterbury Cathedral nave
Winchester Cathedral nave
The Henry VII Chapel at Westminster Abbey (1503–) painted by Canaletto
Magdalen Tower
York Minster crossing tower
St Mary Magdalene, Taunton
Evesham Abbey bell tower
Bridlington Priory west front
Gloucester Cathedral east end (1331–1350), with a four-centred arch window
Canterbury Cathedral crossing tower and transepts
Wells Cathedral crossing tower
Beverley Minster west front
Norwich Cathedral spire and west window
Chichester Cathedral spire
The choir of Gloucester Cathedral conveys an impression of a "cage" of stone and glass. Window tracery and wall decoration form integrated grids.
Gloucester Cathedral cloisters (1370–1412)
Worcester Cathedral cloister: mullions are reinforced with horizontal transoms (1404–1432)
Gate of Trinity Great Court, Cambridge, with a Tudor arch
Henry VII Chapel at Westminster Abbey (completed 1519)
King's College Chapel, Cambridge (1446–1515)
Fan vaulting outside the great hall of Christ Church, Oxford ({{Circa|1640}})
A Queen-post truss
Hammerbeam timber roof of Westminster Hall (1395)
Section of a Hammerbeam timber roof.
Dining Hall of King's College, Cambridge, with a hammerbeam roof
Vaults of St Katharine Cree, London
Mob Quad, Merton College, Oxford (1288–1378)
Balliol College, Oxford front quad (1431)
Tudor arch window at King's College Chapel, Cambridge (1446–1531)
East range of First Quad, Oriel College, Oxford (1637–1642)
Second Court, St John's College, Cambridge
Wills Memorial Building, University of Bristol (1915—1925)
Palace of Westminster, rebuilt by Barry and Pugin 1840–1876
St Mary's Cathedral, Sydney (1868—1928)
Manchester Town Hall, (1868–1877)
Tower Bridge, London, (1886–1894)

This style is ultimately succeeded by Elizabethan architecture and Renaissance architecture under Elizabeth I ((r.

Interior

Sagrestia Vecchia

Older of two sacristies of the Basilica of San Lorenzo in Florence, Italy.

Older of two sacristies of the Basilica of San Lorenzo in Florence, Italy.

Interior

It is one of the most important monuments of the early Italian Renaissance architecture.

Elias Holl

Elias Holl (28 February 1573 in Augsburg – 6 January 1646 in Augsburg)

Elias Holl (28 February 1573 in Augsburg – 6 January 1646 in Augsburg)

was the most important architect of late German Renaissance architecture.

Augsburg Town Hall

Augsburg Rathaus, c. 1818.
View from the Dorint Hotel Tower
The Rathaus, as it stands by the Perlachturm
The Goldener Saal

The Town Hall of Augsburg (German: Augsburger Rathaus) is the administrative centre of Augsburg, Bavaria, Germany, and one of the most significant secular buildings of the Renaissance style north of the Alps.

Santa Maria dei Miracoli, 1480s, by Pietro Lombardo, who was mainly Venice's leading sculptor.

Venetian Renaissance architecture

Venetian Renaissance architecture began rather later than in Florence, not really before the 1480s, and throughout the period mostly relied on architects imported from elsewhere in Italy.

Venetian Renaissance architecture began rather later than in Florence, not really before the 1480s, and throughout the period mostly relied on architects imported from elsewhere in Italy.

Santa Maria dei Miracoli, 1480s, by Pietro Lombardo, who was mainly Venice's leading sculptor.
The huge woodcut View of Venice by Jacopo de' Barbari, 1500, was considered the definitive work depicting the city for much of the century.
Jacopo Sansovino's Palazzo Corner della Ca' Grande, replacing a building burnt down in 1532. [[:File:Venezia-Murano-Burano, Venezia, Italy - panoramio (579).jpg|Compare the much simpler sides]].
Palazzo Dario, 1480s, with characteristic Venetian chimney-pots
Mauro Codussi, Ca' Vendramin Calergi, from 1481
Jacopo Sansovino, Biblioteca Marciana, begun 1537
Michele Sanmicheli, Palazzo Bevilacqua, Verona, begun 1529
Palladio's Palazzo Chiericati, Vicenza, from 1551
Vincenzo Scamozzi's Procuratie Nuove on the Piazza San Marco, begun 1586.
The Arco Foscari in the courtyard of the Doge's Palace, late 1450s
San Zaccaria, Venice, Codussi completed the upper parts of a church begun in Gothic
Scuola Grande di San Giovanni Evangelista, screen by Pietro Lombardo, 1485
Harmony between the Doges' Palace at left and Biblioteca Marciana at right
Sansovino's Zecca, with the Biblioteca Marciana and Doge's Palace beyond
San Francesco della Vigna, begun by Sansovino (1554) and finished by Palladio
Scuola di San Giorgio degli Schiavoni, Sansovino and Giovanni De Zan
Palazzo Tiepolo, the facade originally frescoed by Andrea Schiavone (faint traces remain)
Scuola Grande di San Rocco, various architects
Scuola Grande di San Marco, now a hospital. Pietro Lombardo and Codrussi
Palladio, Villa Badoer, 1556 on, one of his villas on the terrafirma
Palladio's Villa Capra La Rotonda, begun 1567
Palladio's San Giorgio Maggiore, begun 1566
Palladio, the Redentore church, begun 1577
Palazzo Balbi, Alessandro Vittoria, 1582

Compared to the Renaissance architecture of other Italian cities, there was a degree of conservatism, especially in retaining the overall form of buildings, which in the city were usually replacements on a confined site, and in windows, where arched or round tops, sometimes with a classicized version of the tracery of Venetian Gothic architecture, remained far more heavily used than in other cities.

Coffering on the ceiling of the Pantheon (Rome)

Coffer

Series of sunken panels in the shape of a square, rectangle, or octagon in a ceiling, soffit or vault.

Series of sunken panels in the shape of a square, rectangle, or octagon in a ceiling, soffit or vault.

Coffering on the ceiling of the Pantheon (Rome)
Coffered plafond at Wawel Castle, Kraków, Poland
Coffered ceiling of the Sala dell'Udienza, in the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence
Chapelle Expiatoire, Paris
Giuliano da Sangallo's flat caisson ceiling from Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore, Rome
Coffered ceilings of Mir Castle, Belarus
Chancel ceiling, Church of the Good Shepherd (Rosemont, Pennsylvania)
Coffered ceiling in a station on the Washington Metro(Washington, DC)

Experimentation with the possible shapes in coffering, which solve problems of mathematical tiling, or tessellation, were a feature of Islamic as well as Renaissance architecture.

Heidelberg

City in the German state of Baden-Württemberg, situated on the river Neckar in south-west Germany.

City in the German state of Baden-Württemberg, situated on the river Neckar in south-west Germany.

The districts of Heidelberg
Heidelberg seen from Königstuhl
The Old Town
Heidelberg on the Neckar at night
Karlsplatz and Neckar with Old Bridge
Heidelberg Castle, here shown in a painting by Carl Blechen, was destroyed by the French during the war of succession of the Electorate of the Palatinate
View of castle from the Corn Market
The siege of Heidelberg 1622
Main street Heidelberg
Old Bridge Gate
Hotel zum Ritter St. Georg
Old Bridge, Konrad Linck, 1788
Memorial stone marking the site of the synagogue in the Lauerstrasse
Population growth
The marketplace, with Town Hall on the right
Heidelberg's old city centre from the castle above
Heidelberg Castle with the Old Bridge in foreground, 2010
View from the castle during winter, 2014
Historic map of Heidelberg Castle
Heidelberg Castle at night
Heidelberg Fortress
Monastery of St. Michael
View from the so-called "Philosophers' Walk"
(Philosophenweg) towards the Old Town, with Heidelberg Castle, Heiliggeist Church and the Old Bridge
From left: Jesuit Church, Providence Church and Church of the Holy Spirit in Heidelberg's Old Town on the Neckar River
The university library
Old university hall
Buildings of European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg, including the new Advanced Training Centre
SRH Hochschule Heidelberg is one of the oldest and largest private universities in Germany
Print Media Academy
DB train Heidelberg Hauptbahnhof
Trams in Heidelberg
Behördenzentrum Heidelberg
The New city district of Heidelberg, Bahnstadt, is one of the biggest passive house settlements in the world
Heidelberg with the Old Bridge illuminated
Romantic view of Heidelberg Castle ruins by Karl Philipp Fohr, 1815, Hessisches Landesmuseum Darmstadt
Friedrich Ebert first President of Germany from 1919 until his death in office in 1925
Frederick V; Elector Palatine, King of Bohemia
Actor Michael Fassbender was born in Heidelberg

The castle is a mix of styles from Gothic to Renaissance.

View of the principal façade of the Palais Garnier from the Avenue de l'Opéra

Palais Garnier

1,979-seat opera house at the Place de l'Opéra in the 9th arrondissement of Paris, France.

1,979-seat opera house at the Place de l'Opéra in the 9th arrondissement of Paris, France.

View of the principal façade of the Palais Garnier from the Avenue de l'Opéra
View of the principal façade of the Palais Garnier from the Place de l'Opéra
Façade of the Palais Garnier with labels indicating the locations of various sculptures
Two proposed sites for a new opera house, c. 1856, with alternative routes for a broad avenue leading from the Louvre to the new theatre (the future Avenue de l'Opéra)
The Opéra Agence drafting room: Garnier is second from the right, with Edmond Le Deschault on the far right, and Victor Louvet, second from the left
Foundation work (20 May 1862)
Villeminot model (May 1863)
Inauguration of the Paris Opera in 1875 (Édouard Detaille, 1878)
View of the front, c. 1890
Plan of the ground floor
Plan of the main floor
Plan at the auditorium ceiling level
Plan of the roof
Gumery's L'Harmonie (1869), atop the left avant-corps of the façade, is 7.5 metres (25 ft) of gilt copper electrotype
Apollo, Poetry and Music roof sculpture by Aimé Millet
Apollo, Poetry and Music; Apollo's lyre detail
Poetry roof sculpture by Charles Gumery
Lyrical Drama façade sculpture by Jean-Joseph Perraud
The Dance by Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux
Bronze busts of Beethoven and Mozart on the front façade
East façade and the Pavillon des Abonnés
West façade and the Pavillon de l'Empereur
Louis Béroud: L'escalier de l'opéra Garnier, 1877 (Musée Carnavalet)
Engraving from Garnier's Nouvel Opéra, 1880
The grand staircase of the Palais Garnier
The grand staircase
View of the Grand Foyer looking west
View of the Grand Foyer looking east
Part of the ceiling of the Grand Foyer with paintings by Paul Baudry: the central rectangular panel is Music, while the oval panel at the western end is Comedy.<ref name=Fontaine2004p152>Fontaine 2004, p. 152.</ref>
Ceiling of the octagonal salon at the eastern end with Jules-Élie Delaunay's central oval panel, The Zodiac, and over-door panel, Apollo Receiving the Lyre
Auditorium
Transverse section at the auditorium and pavilions
Auditorium. Postcard from 1909
Final model for the ceiling painted by Jules-Eugène Lenepveu
Auditorium chandelier
Lighted chandelier under the ceiling by Marc Chagall
Palais Garnier east side with L'Opéra Restaurant
L'Opéra Restaurant opened in 2011
Entrance elevation of a project for the Théâtre Impériale de l'Opéra by Rohault de Fleury, November 1860
Plan
Perspective view
Plan
Long section
thumb|Piazza Vincenzo Bellini and the adjoining Teatro Massimo Bellini (built from 1870 to 1890 in Catania, Sicily)
The Amazonas theatre in Manaus, Brazil (1884–1896)
The Thomas Jefferson Building at the Library of Congress (1890–1897)
The former Warsaw Philharmonic Hall (1900–1901)
National Opera House of Ukraine (opened 1901)
Municipal Theater of São Paulo (built 1903–1911)
Hanoi Opera House (1901–1911)
Rialto Theatre in Montreal (1923–1924)

The opera was constructed in what Charles Garnier (1825–1898) is said to have told the Empress Eugenie was "Napoleon III" style The Napoleon III style was highly eclectic, and borrowed from many historical sources; the opera house included elements from the Baroque, the classicism of Palladio, and Renaissance architecture blended together.

Château d'Azay-le-Rideau

Loire Valley

Valley located in the middle stretch of the Loire river in central France, in both the administrative regions Pays de la Loire and Centre-Val de Loire.

Valley located in the middle stretch of the Loire river in central France, in both the administrative regions Pays de la Loire and Centre-Val de Loire.

Château d'Azay-le-Rideau
Sunset on the Loire River from the Château de Montsoreau-Museum of Contemporary Art
Vineyards in the Loire Valley
Château de Valençay
The Château de Chambord
Orléans
Tours
Angers

They are a rare association of Renaissance architecture with contemporary art.