Renaissance music

RenaissancemusicRenaissance composerRenaissance eraRenaissance polyphony16th centuryRenaissance composers15th century15th- and 16th-centuryItalian Renaissance
Renaissance music is vocal and instrumental music written and performed in Europe during the Renaissance era.wikipedia
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Baroque music

BaroqueBaroque eraBaroque period
Consensus among music historians has been to start the era around 1400, with the end of the medieval era, and to close it around 1600, with the beginning of the Baroque period, therefore commencing the musical Renaissance about a hundred years after the beginning of the Renaissance as it is understood in other disciplines.
This era followed the Renaissance music era, and was followed in turn by the Classical era.

Medieval music

medievalMiddle Agesmusic
Consensus among music historians has been to start the era around 1400, with the end of the medieval era, and to close it around 1600, with the beginning of the Baroque period, therefore commencing the musical Renaissance about a hundred years after the beginning of the Renaissance as it is understood in other disciplines.
Establishing the end of the medieval era and the beginning of the Renaissance music era is difficult, since the trends started at different times in different regions.

Josquin des Prez

JosquinJosquin DesprezJosquin des Prés
From this changing society emerged a common, unifying musical language, in particular, the polyphonic style (this means music with multiple, independent melody lines performed simultaneously) of the Franco-Flemish school, whose greatest master was Josquin des Prez.
1450/1455 – 27 August 1521), often referred to simply as Josquin, was a French composer of the Renaissance.

Renaissance

the RenaissanceEarly RenaissanceEuropean Renaissance
Renaissance music is vocal and instrumental music written and performed in Europe during the Renaissance era.
Beginning in Italy, and spreading to the rest of Europe by the 16th century, its influence was felt in art, architecture, philosophy, literature, music, science and technology, politics, religion, and other aspects of intellectual inquiry.

Motet

motetsisorhythmic motetMotetus
Dissemination of chansons, motets, and masses throughout Europe coincided with the unification of polyphonic practice into the fluid style which culminated in the second half of the sixteenth century in the work of composers such as Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, Orlande de Lassus, Thomas Tallis, William Byrd and Tomás Luis de Victoria.
The motet was one of the pre-eminent polyphonic forms of Renaissance music.

Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina

PalestrinaGiovanni PalestrinaPalestrinian
Dissemination of chansons, motets, and masses throughout Europe coincided with the unification of polyphonic practice into the fluid style which culminated in the second half of the sixteenth century in the work of composers such as Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, Orlande de Lassus, Thomas Tallis, William Byrd and Tomás Luis de Victoria.
undefined 1525 – 2 February 1594) was an Italian Renaissance composer of sacred music and the best-known 16th-century representative of the Roman School of musical composition.

Orlande de Lassus

LassusOrlando di LassoOrlandus Lassus
Dissemination of chansons, motets, and masses throughout Europe coincided with the unification of polyphonic practice into the fluid style which culminated in the second half of the sixteenth century in the work of composers such as Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, Orlande de Lassus, Thomas Tallis, William Byrd and Tomás Luis de Victoria.
Orlande de Lassus (also Roland de Lassus, Orlando di Lasso, Orlandus Lassus, Orlande de Lattre or Roland de Lattre; 1532, possibly 1530 – 14 June 1594) was a composer of the late Renaissance, chief representative of the mature polyphonic style of the Franco-Flemish school, and considered to be one of the three most famous and influential musicians in Europe at the end of the 16th century (the other two being Palestrina and Victoria).

William Byrd

ByrdCantiones quae ab argumento sacrae vocanturByrd, William
Dissemination of chansons, motets, and masses throughout Europe coincided with the unification of polyphonic practice into the fluid style which culminated in the second half of the sixteenth century in the work of composers such as Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, Orlande de Lassus, Thomas Tallis, William Byrd and Tomás Luis de Victoria.
William Byrd (birth date variously given as c.1539/40 or 1543 – 4 July 1623), was an English composer of the Renaissance.

Counterpoint

contrapuntalcontrapuntallydissonant counterpoint
On the other hand, rules of counterpoint became more constrained, particularly with regard to treatment of dissonances.
It has been most commonly identified in the European classical tradition, strongly developing during the Renaissance and in much of the common practice period, especially in the Baroque.

Early music

earlyearly-musicearlier music
Beginning in the late 20th century, numerous early music ensembles were formed.
Early music generally comprises Medieval music (500–1400) and Renaissance music (1400–1600), but can also include Baroque music (1600–1750).

Secular music

secularsecular songsecular songs
Secular music absorbed techniques from sacred music, and vice versa.
Non-religious secular music and sacred music were the two main genres of Western music during the Middle Ages and Renaissance era.

Madrigal

madrigalsmadrigalistmadrigalists
Popular secular forms such as the chanson and madrigal spread throughout Europe.
A madrigal is a secular vocal music composition of the Renaissance and early Baroque eras.

Early modern period

early moderncolonial eraearly modern era
As in the other arts, the music of the period was significantly influenced by the developments which define the Early Modern period: the rise of humanistic thought; the recovery of the literary and artistic heritage of Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome; increased innovation and discovery; the growth of commercial enterprises; the rise of a bourgeois class; and the Protestant Reformation.
European music of the period is generally divided between Renaissance and Baroque.

Triad (music)

triadtriadstriadic
During the 15th century, the sound of full triads became common, and towards the end of the 16th century the system of church modes began to break down entirely, giving way to the functional tonality (the system in which songs and pieces are based on musical "keys"), which would dominate Western art music for the next three centuries.
In the late Renaissance music era, and especially during the Baroque music era (1600–1750), Western art music shifted from a more "horizontal" contrapuntal approach (in which multiple, independent melody lines were interwoven) toward progressions, which are sequences of triads.

Madrigale spirituale

madrigali spirituali
Other sacred genres were the madrigale spirituale and the laude.
Most examples of the form date from the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras, and principally come from Italy and Germany.

Lute song

lute songsElizabethan lute songslute music
Other secular vocal genres included the caccia, rondeau, virelai, bergerette, ballade, musique mesurée, canzonetta, villanella, villotta, and the lute song.
The term lute song is given to a music style from the late 16th century to early 17th century, late Renaissance to early Baroque, that was predominantly in England and France.

Lauda (song)

laudelaudaLaude spirituale
Other sacred genres were the madrigale spirituale and the laude.
The lauda (Italian pl. laude) or lauda spirituale was the most important form of vernacular sacred song in Italy in the late medieval era and Renaissance.

Motet-chanson

Mixed forms such as the motet-chanson and the secular motet also appeared.
The motet-chanson was a specialized musical form of the Renaissance, developed in Milan during the 1470s and 1480s, which combined aspects of the contemporary motet and chanson.

Viol

viola da gambabass violgambist
Purely instrumental music included consort music for recorders or viols and other instruments, and dances for various ensembles.
Viols first appeared in Spain in the mid to late 15th century and were most popular in the Renaissance and Baroque (1600–1750) periods.

Canon (music)

canoncanonscanonic
Other secular vocal genres included the caccia, rondeau, virelai, bergerette, ballade, musique mesurée, canzonetta, villanella, villotta, and the lute song.
During the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Baroque—that is, through the early 18th century—any kind of imitative musical counterpoints were called fugues, with the strict imitation now known as canon qualified as fuga ligata, meaning "fettered fugue".

Ricercar

ricercareRecercarRicecare
Common instrumental genres were the toccata, prelude, ricercar, and canzona.
A ricercar (, also spelled ricercare, recercar, recercare) is a type of late Renaissance and mostly early Baroque instrumental composition.

Toccata

toccatasKhachaturian's ToccataToccatina
Common instrumental genres were the toccata, prelude, ricercar, and canzona.
The form first appeared in the late Renaissance period.

Prelude (music)

preludepreludesIntrada
Common instrumental genres were the toccata, prelude, ricercar, and canzona.
These were closely followed by freely composed preludes in an extemporary style for the lute and other Renaissance string instruments, which were originally used for warming up the fingers and checking the instrument's tuning and sound quality, as in a group of pieces by Joan Ambrosio Dalza published in 1508 under the heading tastar de corde (in Italian, literally, "testing of the strings").

Intermedio

intermediintermediiextravaganzas
Towards the end of the period, the early dramatic precursors of opera such as monody, the madrigal comedy, and the intermedio are heard.
The intermedio (also intromessa, introdutto, tramessa, tramezzo, intermezzo), in the Italian Renaissance, was a theatrical performance or spectacle with music and often dance, which was performed between the acts of a play to celebrate special occasions in Italian courts.

Cyclic mass

Cantus firmus masscantus-firmus masscyclic
In Renaissance music, the cyclic mass was a setting of the Ordinary of the Roman Catholic Mass, in which each of the movements – Kyrie, Gloria, Credo, Sanctus, and Agnus Dei – shared a common musical theme, commonly a cantus firmus, thus making it a unified whole.