Report on the Affairs of British North America

Durham ReportLord Durham's ReportHis reportreportLord Durham's 1839 ReportDurham's ReportReport on the Affairs of British North America (1839)1839 ''ReportCanadaLord Durham's Report on Canada
The Report on the Affairs of British North America, commonly known as the Durham Report, or Lord Durham's Report is an important document in the history of Quebec, Ontario, Canada and the British Empire.wikipedia
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Canada

CanadianCANCanadians
The Report on the Affairs of British North America, commonly known as the Durham Report, or Lord Durham's Report is an important document in the history of Quebec, Ontario, Canada and the British Empire.
The Durham Report subsequently recommended responsible government and the assimilation of French Canadians into English culture.

Rebellions of 1837–1838

Rebellions of 1837Rebellion of 18371837 Rebellion
The notable British Whig politician John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham, was sent to the Canadas in 1838 to investigate and report on the causes of the rebellions of 1837–38.
The rebellions led directly to Lord Durham's Report on the Affairs of British North America and to The British North America Act, 1840 which partially reformed the British provinces into a unitary system and eventually led to the British North America Act, 1867 which created Canada and its government.

British North America

BritishNorth AmericaBritish North American
He had just been appointed Governor General and given special powers as high commissioner of British North America.
The term was first used informally in 1783, but it was uncommon before the Report on the Affairs of British North America (1839), called the Durham Report.

Quebec

QuébecProvince of QuebecQC
The Report on the Affairs of British North America, commonly known as the Durham Report, or Lord Durham's Report is an important document in the history of Quebec, Ontario, Canada and the British Empire.
After the rebellions, Lord Durham was asked to undertake a study and prepare a report on the matter and to offer a solution for the British Parliament to assess.

The Canadas

Upper and Lower CanadaCanadaCanadas
The notable British Whig politician John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham, was sent to the Canadas in 1838 to investigate and report on the causes of the rebellions of 1837–38.
The Canadas were merged into a single entity in 1841, shortly after Lord Durham published his Report on the Affairs of British North America.

John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham

Lord DurhamJohn George LambtonEarl of Durham
The notable British Whig politician John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham, was sent to the Canadas in 1838 to investigate and report on the causes of the rebellions of 1837–38.
Durham's detailed and famous Report on the Affairs of British North America (London, January 1839) recommended a modified form of responsible government and a legislative union of Upper Canada, Lower Canada and the Maritime Provinces.

British Empire

BritishEmpireBritain
The Report on the Affairs of British North America, commonly known as the Durham Report, or Lord Durham's Report is an important document in the history of Quebec, Ontario, Canada and the British Empire.
The path to independence for the white colonies of the British Empire began with the 1839 Durham Report, which proposed unification and self-government for Upper and Lower Canada, as a solution to political unrest which had erupted in armed rebellions in 1837.

Upper Canada

UpperProvince of Upper CanadaUpper Canadian
In Upper and Lower Canada, he formed numerous committees consisting of essentially all the opponents of the Patriotes and made many personal observations of life in the colonies.
Durham's report led to the administrative unification of Upper and Lower Canada as the Province of Canada in 1841.

Province of Canada

Canada WestUnited Province of CanadaCanada
Durham resigned on 9 October 1838 amid controversy excited in London by his decision of the penal questions and was soon replaced by Charles Poulett Thomson, 1st Baron Sydenham, who was responsible for implementing the Union of the Canadas.
Its formation reflected recommendations made by John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham in the Report on the Affairs of British North America following the Rebellions of 1837–1838.

History of Canada

Canadian historyCanadahistory
British Government then sent Lord Durham to examine the situation; he stayed in Canada only five months before returning to Britain and brought with him his Durham Report, which strongly recommended responsible government.

Charles Buller

For a long time it was believed that Buller wrote Lord Durham's famous Report on the Affairs of British North America.

Edward Gibbon Wakefield

WakefieldEdward WakefieldWakefield scheme
Here Durham went into seclusion while he wrote and then presented to Parliament a report on his administration.

Ontario

Ontario, CanadaONProvince of Ontario
The Report on the Affairs of British North America, commonly known as the Durham Report, or Lord Durham's Report is an important document in the history of Quebec, Ontario, Canada and the British Empire.

Whigs (British political party)

WhigWhigsWhig Party
The notable British Whig politician John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham, was sent to the Canadas in 1838 to investigate and report on the causes of the rebellions of 1837–38.

Quebec City

QuebecQuebec City, QuebecQuébec City
Durham arrived in Quebec City on 29 May.

Governor General of Canada

Governor GeneralGovernor-General of CanadaGovernor-General
He had just been appointed Governor General and given special powers as high commissioner of British North America.

Lower Canada

LowerProvince of Lower CanadaLower Canadian
In Upper and Lower Canada, he formed numerous committees consisting of essentially all the opponents of the Patriotes and made many personal observations of life in the colonies.

Patriote movement

PatriotePatriotesLes Patriotes
In Upper and Lower Canada, he formed numerous committees consisting of essentially all the opponents of the Patriotes and made many personal observations of life in the colonies.

Royal Proclamation of 1763

Proclamation of 1763Royal ProclamationProclamation Line of 1763
The freedoms granted to the French Canadians under the Royal Proclamation of 1763 and the Quebec Act of 1774 should also be rescinded; according to Lord Durham this would eliminate the possibility of future rebellions.

Quebec Act

Quebec Act of 1774Province of QuebecQuebec Act, 1774
The freedoms granted to the French Canadians under the Royal Proclamation of 1763 and the Quebec Act of 1774 should also be rescinded; according to Lord Durham this would eliminate the possibility of future rebellions.

Louis-Joseph Papineau

Louis Joseph PapineauPapineauLouis-Joseph
In exile in France, Louis-Joseph Papineau published the Histoire de la résistance du Canada au gouvernement anglais (History of the resistance of Canada to the English government) in the French La Revue du Progrès in May 1839.

Ludger Duvernay

In June, it appeared in Canada in Ludger Duvernay's La Revue canadienne as Histoire de l'insurrection du Canada en réfutation du Rapport de Lord Durham (History of the insurrection of Canada in refutation of the Report of Lord Durham).

Wolfred Nelson

It was pointed out that many of the Patriote leaders were of British or British Canadian origin, including among others Wolfred Nelson, hero of the Battle of Saint-Denis; Robert Nelson, author of the Declaration of Independence of Lower Canada, who would have become President of Lower Canada had the second insurrection succeeded; journalist Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan; and Thomas Storrow Brown, general during the Battle of St-Charles.

Battle of Saint-Denis (1837)

Battle of Saint-DenisSaint-Denisa battle
It was pointed out that many of the Patriote leaders were of British or British Canadian origin, including among others Wolfred Nelson, hero of the Battle of Saint-Denis; Robert Nelson, author of the Declaration of Independence of Lower Canada, who would have become President of Lower Canada had the second insurrection succeeded; journalist Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan; and Thomas Storrow Brown, general during the Battle of St-Charles.

Robert Nelson (insurrectionist)

Robert NelsonNelson, Robert
It was pointed out that many of the Patriote leaders were of British or British Canadian origin, including among others Wolfred Nelson, hero of the Battle of Saint-Denis; Robert Nelson, author of the Declaration of Independence of Lower Canada, who would have become President of Lower Canada had the second insurrection succeeded; journalist Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan; and Thomas Storrow Brown, general during the Battle of St-Charles.