Republic Aviation

RepublicSeverskyRepublic AircraftRepublic Aviation CompanyRepublic Aircraft CorporationRepublic Aviation CorporationSeversky Aircraft CorporationSeversky Aircraft Companyhis own aircraft companyRepublic Aircraft Company
The Republic Aviation Corporation was an American aircraft manufacturer based in Farmingdale, New York, on Long Island.wikipedia
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Republic F-105 Thunderchief

F-105 ThunderchiefF-105Republic F-105D Thunderchief
Originally known as the Seversky Aircraft Company, the company was responsible for the design and production of many important military aircraft, including its most famous products: World War II's P-47 Thunderbolt fighter, the F-84 Thunderjet and F-105 Thunderchief jet fighters, as well as the A-10 Thunderbolt II close-support aircraft.
Republic Aviation started the Thunderchief as an internal project to replace the RF-84F Thunderflash, which first used the characteristic wing-root air intakes to make room for cameras in the nose section.

Seversky P-35

P-35J 9Seversky P-35 Guardsman
After several failed attempts, Seversky Aircraft finally won a design competition for a new United States Army Air Corps fighter, and was awarded its first military contract in 1936 for the production of its Seversky P-35.
The Seversky P-35 is an American fighter aircraft built by the Seversky Aircraft Company in the late 1930s.

Alexander Kartveli

Kartveli, Alexander
In the beginning, many of Seversky Aircraft's designers were Russian and Georgian engineers, including Michael Gregor and Alexander Kartveli, who would go on to design many of Republic's most famous aircraft.
In his little company which later was renamed to Seversky Aircraft Corporation, Kartvelishvili worked as chief engineer.

Farmingdale, New York

FarmingdaleFarmingdale, NYFarmingdale, Long Island
The Republic Aviation Corporation was an American aircraft manufacturer based in Farmingdale, New York, on Long Island. The American Airpower Museum, which is based on the former Republic factory site in Farmingdale, New York, maintains a collection of Republic artifacts, historic facilities, and an array of aircraft spanning the history of the company.
Later, Farmingdale became a locus for the aircraft industry, notably Republic Aviation Company.

W. Wallace Kellett

The board, led by financier Paul Moore, voted W. Wallace Kellett to replace him as president, and in September 1939, the company was reorganized as the Republic Aviation Corporation.
He was president of Kellett Autogiro Corporation and Republic Aviation Corporation.

Alexander P. de Seversky

Alexander de SeverskyAlexander Procofieff de SeverskyAlexander Seversky
The Seversky Aircraft Company was founded in 1931 by Alexander de Seversky, a Russian expatriate and veteran World War I pilot who had lost a leg in the war.
Using the $50,000 from the sale of his bombsight to the U. S. Government, Seversky founded the Seversky Aero Corporation in 1923.

Republic P-47 Thunderbolt

P-47 ThunderboltP-47P-47 Thunderbolts
Originally known as the Seversky Aircraft Company, the company was responsible for the design and production of many important military aircraft, including its most famous products: World War II's P-47 Thunderbolt fighter, the F-84 Thunderjet and F-105 Thunderchief jet fighters, as well as the A-10 Thunderbolt II close-support aircraft.
In 1939, Republic Aviation designed the AP-4 demonstrator powered by a Pratt & Whitney R-1830 radial engine with a belly-mounted turbocharger.

Republic RC-3 Seabee

Republic SeabeeSeabeeOA-15 Seabee
In 1946, Republic temporarily left the field of military contracts to produce the Republic RC-3 Seabee, an unusual all-metal amphibian.
The Republic RC-3 Seabee is an all-metal amphibious sports aircraft designed by Percival Spencer and manufactured by the Republic Aircraft Corporation.

Republic F-84 Thunderjet

F-84 ThunderjetRepublic F-84G ThunderjetF-84G Thunderjet
Originally known as the Seversky Aircraft Company, the company was responsible for the design and production of many important military aircraft, including its most famous products: World War II's P-47 Thunderbolt fighter, the F-84 Thunderjet and F-105 Thunderchief jet fighters, as well as the A-10 Thunderbolt II close-support aircraft.
In 1944, Republic Aviation's chief designer, Alexander Kartveli, began working on a turbojet-powered replacement for the P-47 Thunderbolt piston-engined fighter.

Paul Moore Sr.

Paul Moore, Sr.fatherPaul Moore
The board, led by financier Paul Moore, voted W. Wallace Kellett to replace him as president, and in September 1939, the company was reorganized as the Republic Aviation Corporation.
He reorganized Seversky Aircraft to Republic Aviation in 1939, and sat on the boards of several enterprises put together by his father and uncle, James Hobart Moore, among them United States Steel, National Biscuit Company, Bankers Trust, the American Can Company, and the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad.

American Airpower Museum

The American Airpower Museum, which is based on the former Republic factory site in Farmingdale, New York, maintains a collection of Republic artifacts, historic facilities, and an array of aircraft spanning the history of the company.
The American Airpower Museum is an aviation museum located on the former site of Republic Aviation at Republic Airport in East Farmingdale, New York.

Seversky A8V

Seversky A8V1 Type S Two Seat FighterA8VA8V-1
In the late 1930s, Seversky aircraft exported twenty two-seat 2PA-B3 to Japan for operational service by the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service as the A8V1 Type S Two Seat Fighter.

Seversky SEV-3

Seversky BT-8Seversky SEV-2XPBT-8
The Seversky SEV-3 was an American three-seat amphibian monoplane, the first aircraft designed and built by the Seversky Aircraft Corporation.

Republic P-43 Lancer

P-43 LancerRepublic P-44 RocketP-43
Meanwhile, Seversky's AP-4 continued in development, finally going into production as the P-43 Lancer.
The Republic P-43 Lancer was a single-engine, all-metal, low-wing monoplane fighter aircraft built by Republic, first delivered to the United States Army Air Corps in 1940.

Republic XF-12 Rainbow

Republic RC-2 RainbowRepublic XF-12Republic XR-12 Rainbow
In an effort to keep the company going, Republic proposed converting a wartime-developed four-engine reconnaissance aircraft (the XF-12 Rainbow) into a transport aircraft.
The Republic XF-12 Rainbow was an American four-engine, all-metal prototype reconnaissance aircraft designed by the Republic Aviation Company in the late 1940s.

Republic XF-91 Thunderceptor

XF-91 ThunderceptorRepublic XF-91F-91
The Republic XF-91 Thunderceptor (originally designated XP-91) is a mixed-propulsion prototype interceptor aircraft, developed by Republic Aviation.

Republic-Ford JB-2

JB-2 LoonJB-2KGW-1 Loon
By 8 September, the first of thirteen complete JB-2s, reverse engineered from the material received at Wright Field in July was assembled at Republic Aviation.

Long Island

Long Island, New YorkLong Island, NYEastern Long Island
The Republic Aviation Corporation was an American aircraft manufacturer based in Farmingdale, New York, on Long Island.
From about 1930 to about 1990, Long Island was considered one of the aerospace manufacturing centers of the United States, with companies such as Grumman Aircraft, Republic, Fairchild, and Curtiss having their headquarters and factories on Long Island.

Republic XF-103

XF-103F-103Republic F-103
Republic was one of six companies to submit proposals.

Fairchild Aircraft

FairchildFairchild HillerFairchild Dornier
In the early 1960s, the aerospace company Fairchild, owned by Sherman Fairchild began purchasing Republic's stock and finally acquired Republic Aviation in July 1965.
In 1965, the company acquired the Republic Aviation Company.

V-1 flying bomb

V-1V1V1 flying bomb
By 8 September, the first of thirteen complete prototype Republic-Ford JB-2 Loons, was assembled at Republic Aviation.

Republic F-84F Thunderstreak

F-84F ThunderstreakRepublic RF-84F ThunderflashRF-84F Thunderstreak
In 1949, a swept-wing version, the F-84F Thunderstreak, was developed but additional development and engine problems resulted in the aircraft not entering service until 1954.