Republic Pictures

RepublicRepublic StudiosRepublic Pictures Home VideoRepublic Pictures TelevisionRepublic Pictures CorporationRepublic EntertainmentRepublic FilmsRepublic StudioRepublic Studio Sound DepartmentHollywood Television Service
Republic Pictures Corporation was an American motion picture production-distribution corporation in operation from 1935 to 1967, that was based in Los Angeles, California.wikipedia
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Serial film

film serialserialmovie serial
It was best known for specializing in Westerns, serials and B films emphasizing mystery and action.
This was in 1937, and Columbia was probably inspired by the previous year's serial blockbuster success at Universal, Flash Gordon, the first serial ever to play at a major theater on Broadway; and by the success of that same year of the newly created Republic Pictures, which dedicated itself to a program of serials and westerns, eschewing major productions in their favor.

Herbert J. Yates

Herbert YatesHerbert J. Yates presents
Under Herbert J. Yates, Republic was considered a mini-major film studio. Created in 1935 by Herbert J. Yates, a longtime investor in film (having invested in 20th Century Pictures at its founding in 1933) and owner of the film processing laboratory Consolidated Film Industries, Republic was initially formed by Yates' acquisition of six smaller independent Poverty Row studios.
Herbert John Yates (August 24, 1880 – February 3, 1966) was the founder and president of Republic Pictures, who had western stars John Wayne, Gene Autry, and Roy Rogers under contract.

Roy Rogers

The Roy Rogers ShowLeonard SlyeRogers
Republic was also notable for developing the careers of John Wayne, Gene Autry and Roy Rogers. Republic also acquired Brunswick Records to record its singing cowboys Gene Autry and Roy Rogers and hired Cy Feuer as head of its music department. The heart of the company was its westerns, and its many western-film leads — among them John Wayne, Gene Autry, Rex Allen and Roy Rogers — became recognizable stars at Republic.
Slye ended up winning the contest and was given the stage name Roy Rogers by Republic Pictures, suggesting the western-sounding name Roy and combining it with the surname of the popular western comic entertainer Will Rogers.

Gene Autry

The Gene Autry ShowGolden West BroadcastersGene
Republic was also notable for developing the careers of John Wayne, Gene Autry and Roy Rogers. Republic also acquired Brunswick Records to record its singing cowboys Gene Autry and Roy Rogers and hired Cy Feuer as head of its music department. The heart of the company was its westerns, and its many western-film leads — among them John Wayne, Gene Autry, Rex Allen and Roy Rogers — became recognizable stars at Republic.
Together, Autry and Burnette made their film debut for Mascot Pictures Corp. in In Old Santa Fe as part of a singing cowboy quartet; he was then given the starring role by Levine in 1935 in the 12-part serial The Phantom Empire. Shortly thereafter, Mascot was absorbed by the newly formed Republic Pictures Corp. and Autry went along to make a further 44 films up to 1940, all B Westerns in which he played under his own name, rode his horse, Champion, had Burnette as his regular sidekick, and had many opportunities to sing in each film.

John Wayne

Marion MorrisonMarion Michael Morrisonthe actor
Republic was also notable for developing the careers of John Wayne, Gene Autry and Roy Rogers. The heart of the company was its westerns, and its many western-film leads — among them John Wayne, Gene Autry, Rex Allen and Roy Rogers — became recognizable stars at Republic.
Wayne did not attempt to prevent his reclassification as 1-A (draft eligible), but Republic Studios was emphatically resistant to losing him since he was their only A-list actor under contract.

Macbeth (1948 film)

Macbeth1948 film adaptation1948
It was also responsible for the financing and distribution of several John Ford-directed films during the 1940s and early 1950s and one Shakespeare film, Macbeth (1948), directed by Orson Welles.
Teaming with producer Charles K. Feldman, Welles successfully convinced Herbert Yates, founder and president of Republic Pictures, of the prospect of creating a film version of Macbeth.

Monogram Pictures

Allied ArtistsAllied Artists PicturesMonogram
Six surviving small companies (Monogram Pictures, Mascot Pictures, Liberty Pictures, Majestic Pictures, Chesterfield Pictures and Invincible Pictures) were all in debt to Yates' lab.
In 1935, Johnston and Carr were wooed by Herbert Yates of Consolidated Film Industries; Yates planned to merge Monogram with several other smaller independent companies to form Republic Pictures.

Independent film

independentindieindie film
Created in 1935 by Herbert J. Yates, a longtime investor in film (having invested in 20th Century Pictures at its founding in 1933) and owner of the film processing laboratory Consolidated Film Industries, Republic was initially formed by Yates' acquisition of six smaller independent Poverty Row studios.

Trem Carr

Trem Carr PicturesTrem Carr Productions
In 1935 the company was merged into the newly-created Republic Pictures, but a year later Carr broke away and reestablished Monogram as an independent company.

Mascot Pictures

MascotMascot Pictures Corporation
Six surviving small companies (Monogram Pictures, Mascot Pictures, Liberty Pictures, Majestic Pictures, Chesterfield Pictures and Invincible Pictures) were all in debt to Yates' lab.
In 1936 it merged with several other companies to form Republic Pictures.

Majestic Pictures

MajesticMajestic Motion Picture Co.
Six surviving small companies (Monogram Pictures, Mascot Pictures, Liberty Pictures, Majestic Pictures, Chesterfield Pictures and Invincible Pictures) were all in debt to Yates' lab.
In 1935, along with other studios such as Monogram and Chesterfield, Majestic was absorbed into Republic Pictures.

Poverty Row

Poverty Row studio
Created in 1935 by Herbert J. Yates, a longtime investor in film (having invested in 20th Century Pictures at its founding in 1933) and owner of the film processing laboratory Consolidated Film Industries, Republic was initially formed by Yates' acquisition of six smaller independent Poverty Row studios.

Orson Welles

WellesWellesianWelles, Orson
It was also responsible for the financing and distribution of several John Ford-directed films during the 1940s and early 1950s and one Shakespeare film, Macbeth (1948), directed by Orson Welles.
Prior to 1948, Welles convinced Republic Pictures to let him direct a low-budget version of Macbeth, which featured highly stylized sets and costumes, and a cast of actors lip-syncing to a pre-recorded soundtrack, one of many innovative cost-cutting techniques Welles deployed in an attempt to make an epic film from B-movie resources.

Liberty Pictures

Liberty
Six surviving small companies (Monogram Pictures, Mascot Pictures, Liberty Pictures, Majestic Pictures, Chesterfield Pictures and Invincible Pictures) were all in debt to Yates' lab.
In 1935 the company was taken over by the larger Republic Pictures.

Nat Levine

He was personal secretary to Marcus Loew, formed Mascot Pictures in 1927, and merged Mascot with Herbert Yates's Republic Pictures in 1935.

Twentieth Century Pictures

20th Century Pictures20th Century20th Century Pictures, Inc.
Created in 1935 by Herbert J. Yates, a longtime investor in film (having invested in 20th Century Pictures at its founding in 1933) and owner of the film processing laboratory Consolidated Film Industries, Republic was initially formed by Yates' acquisition of six smaller independent Poverty Row studios.
Twentieth Century Pictures, Inc. was an independent Hollywood motion picture production company created in 1933 by Joseph Schenck (the former president of United Artists) and Darryl F. Zanuck from Warner Bros. Financial backing came from Schenck's younger brother Nicholas Schenck, president of Loew's, the theater chain that owned Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM), Louis B. Mayer of MGM, who wanted a position for his son-in-law, William Goetz, Bank of America and Herbert J. Yates owner of the film processing laboratory Consolidated Film Industries, who later founded Republic Pictures Corporation in 1935.

Larry Darmour

Larry Darmour Productions
Simultaneously Darmour also began producing for the higher-budget Majestic Pictures until 1935, when Majestic was absorbed into Republic Pictures.

Cy Feuer

Feur and Martin
Republic also acquired Brunswick Records to record its singing cowboys Gene Autry and Roy Rogers and hired Cy Feuer as head of its music department.
Feuer found employment at Republic Pictures, serving as musical director, arranger, and/or composer of more than 125 mostly B-movies, many of them serials and westerns, for the next decade, save for a three-year interruption to serve in the military during World War II.

B movie

B-movieB-moviesB movies
It was best known for specializing in Westerns, serials and B films emphasizing mystery and action.

Sands of Iwo Jima

movieSands of "Iowa" Jima
However, by the mid-'40s Yates was producing better-quality pictures, mounting big-budget fare like The Quiet Man, Sands of Iwo Jima, Johnny Guitar and The Maverick Queen.
The picture was a Republic Pictures production.

Trucolor

During the late '40s and '50s Yates utilized a low-cost Cinecolor process called Trucolor in many of his films, including Johnny Guitar (1954), The Last Command (1955), and Magic Fire (1956).
Trucolor was a color motion picture process used and owned by the Consolidated Film Industries division of Republic Pictures.

Rex Allen

The heart of the company was its westerns, and its many western-film leads — among them John Wayne, Gene Autry, Rex Allen and Roy Rogers — became recognizable stars at Republic.
When singing cowboys such as Roy Rogers and Gene Autry were very much in vogue in American film, in 1949 Republic Pictures in Hollywood gave him a screen test and put him under contract.

Judy Canova

Judy Canova ShowThe Judy Canova Show
Republic produced many "hillbilly" rural musicals and comedies featuring Bob Burns, The Weaver Brothers and Judy Canova that were popular in many rural areas of the United States.
An offer from Warner Bros. led to several bit parts before she signed with Republic Pictures.

Magic Fire

During the late '40s and '50s Yates utilized a low-cost Cinecolor process called Trucolor in many of his films, including Johnny Guitar (1954), The Last Command (1955), and Magic Fire (1956).
Magic Fire is a 1955 American biographical film about the life of composer Richard Wagner, released by Republic Pictures.

Vera Ralston

Vera Hruba RalstonVěra HrubáVera Hruba
From the mid-'40s Republic films often featured Vera Hruba Ralston, a former ice-skater from Czechoslovakia who had won the heart of studio boss Yates, becoming the second Mrs. Yates in 1949.
She moved to Hollywood with her mother and signed a contract in 1943 with Republic Pictures.