Republican Revolution

1994 Republican RevolutionThe Republican Revolution1994strong Republican wave of 1994took control of the House1994 "Republican Revolution1994 midterm elections1994 Republican landslide1994 Republican sweep1994 Republican takeover
The Republican Revolution, Revolution of '94, or Gingrich Revolution, refers to the Republican Party (GOP) success in the 1994 U.S. midterm elections, which resulted in a net gain of 54 seats in the House of Representatives, and a pickup of eight seats in the Senate.wikipedia
430 Related Articles

1994 United States House of Representatives elections

1994Re-elected in 1994Elected in 1994
The Republican Revolution, Revolution of '94, or Gingrich Revolution, refers to the Republican Party (GOP) success in the 1994 U.S. midterm elections, which resulted in a net gain of 54 seats in the House of Representatives, and a pickup of eight seats in the Senate.
The 1994 United States House of Representatives election (also known as the Republican Revolution) was held on November 8, 1994, in the middle of President Bill Clinton's first term.

1994 United States elections

1994 elections19941994 midterm elections
The Republican Revolution, Revolution of '94, or Gingrich Revolution, refers to the Republican Party (GOP) success in the 1994 U.S. midterm elections, which resulted in a net gain of 54 seats in the House of Representatives, and a pickup of eight seats in the Senate.
The elections have been described as the "Republican Revolution" because the Republican Party captured unified control of Congress, previously achieved in the November 1952 elections.

Bill Clinton

ClintonPresident ClintonPresident Bill Clinton
They alleged President Bill Clinton was not the New Democrat he claimed to be during his 1992 campaign but was a "tax and spend" liberal.
In the 1994 elections, the Republican Party won unified control of the Congress for the first time in 40 years.

Richard Shelby

Richard C. ShelbyDick ShelbyRanking Member Shelby
The day after the election, conservative Democrat Senator Richard Shelby of Alabama changed parties, becoming a Republican; on March 3, 1995, Colorado senator Ben Nighthorse Campbell switched to the Republican side as well, increasing the GOP senate majority.
In 1994, the day after the Republican Revolution in which the GOP gained the majority in Congress midway through President Bill Clinton's first term, Shelby switched party affiliations and became a Republican.

Solid South

solidly Democratic Southwas a givena Democratic bastion
From 1933 into the early 1970s, most white conservatives in the South belonged to the Democratic Party, and created the Solid South block in Congress.
Via the "Republican Revolution" in the 1994 elections, Republicans captured a majority of Southern House seats for the first time.

Republican Party (United States)

RepublicanRepublican PartyR
The Republican Revolution, Revolution of '94, or Gingrich Revolution, refers to the Republican Party (GOP) success in the 1994 U.S. midterm elections, which resulted in a net gain of 54 seats in the House of Representatives, and a pickup of eight seats in the Senate.
In the Republican Revolution of 1994, the party—led by House Minority Whip Newt Gingrich, who campaigned on the "Contract with America"—won majorities in both Houses of Congress.

Southern Democrats

Southern DemocratDemocraticSouthern Democratic
The 1994 election also marked the end of the conservative coalition, a bipartisan coalition of conservative Republicans and Democrats (often referred to as "boll weevil Democrats" for their association with the South).
However, many continued to vote for Democrats at the state and local levels, especially before 1994.

United States House of Representatives

U.S. RepresentativeU.S. House of RepresentativesUnited States Representative
The Republican Revolution, Revolution of '94, or Gingrich Revolution, refers to the Republican Party (GOP) success in the 1994 U.S. midterm elections, which resulted in a net gain of 54 seats in the House of Representatives, and a pickup of eight seats in the Senate.
The Republicans took control of the House in 1995, under the leadership of Speaker Newt Gingrich.

Conservative coalition

coalitionconservative Congress
The 1994 election also marked the end of the conservative coalition, a bipartisan coalition of conservative Republicans and Democrats (often referred to as "boll weevil Democrats" for their association with the South).
The conservative Democrats formed the Blue Dog Coalition, after the Republican Revolution in 1994.

Rick Santorum

SantorumKaren Garver Santorum[Rick] Santorum
He was first elected to the Senate during the 1994 Republican takeover, narrowly defeating incumbent Democrat Harris Wofford, 49% to 47%.

Bob Dole

Robert DoleDoleRobert J. Dole
The new senatorial Republican majority chose Bob Dole, previously Minority Leader, as Majority Leader.
The Republicans took control of both the Senate and House of Representatives in the 1994 mid-term elections, due to the fallout from President Bill Clinton's policies including his health care plan, and Dole became Senate Majority Leader for the second time.

Conservative Democrat

Conservative DemocratsconservativeDemocratic
The day after the election, conservative Democrat Senator Richard Shelby of Alabama changed parties, becoming a Republican; on March 3, 1995, Colorado senator Ben Nighthorse Campbell switched to the Republican side as well, increasing the GOP senate majority.
The Blue Dog Coalition was formed in 1995 during the 104th Congress to give members from the Democratic Party representing conservative-leaning districts a unified voice after the Democrats' loss of Congress in the U.S. Congressional election of 1994 Republican Revolution.

Bill Frist

William H. FristSenator Bill FristWilliam "Bill" Frist M.D.
Frist won the election, defeating Sasser by 13 points in the 1994 Republican sweep of both Houses of Congress, thus becoming the first physician in the Senate since June 17, 1938, when Royal S. Copeland died.

George Allen (American politician)

George AllenAllenGeorge F. Allen
Republican George Allen won the 1993 Virginia Governor election and Texas Republican Kay Bailey Hutchison won a U.S. Senate seat from the Democrats in the 1993 special election.
More importantly, he was running at the start of what would become the 1994 Republican Revolution.

Bob Barr

Political positions of Bob Barr*Robert Barr[Bob] Barr
The election became known as the "Republican Revolution" because it resulted in the first Republican House majority in 40 years – since the 1955 adjournment of the 83rd Congress.

Florida's 1st congressional district

1st11st Congressional District
This changed with the Republican Revolution of 1994.

Michael Patrick Flanagan

Michael FlanaganMichael P. FlanaganMike Flanagan
His was one of fifty-four Republican victories in the House of Representatives that allowed the party to take control of both houses of Congress, as part of the Republican Revolution.

Saxby Chambliss

C. Saxby ChamblissChamblissChambliss, Saxby
A long-time Congressman and fellow Georgian, Newt Gingrich, was the leader of the movement, and Chambliss and the other Republicans elected that year are known as the Class of '94.

1994 United States Senate elections

United States Senate elections, 19941994a year that saw Republican gains everywhere
The Republican Revolution, Revolution of '94, or Gingrich Revolution, refers to the Republican Party (GOP) success in the 1994 U.S. midterm elections, which resulted in a net gain of 54 seats in the House of Representatives, and a pickup of eight seats in the Senate.
Collectively, these Republican gains are known as the Republican Revolution.

Illinois's 5th congressional district

5th5th DistrictIllinois' 5th congressional district
On a national level, the scandal helped prompt the Republican Revolution of 1994.

Richard Burr

BurrRichard M. BurrSenator Richard Burr
In 1994 he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives for North Carolina's 5th Congressional District as part of the Republican Revolution.

Tom Coburn

CoburnThomas A. CoburnCoburn, Tom
Coburn was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1994 as part of the Republican Revolution.

Harris Wofford

Harris L. WoffordHarris Wofford Jr.Senator Harris Wofford
The election was part of that year's Republican Revolution, in which many Democrats were ousted from both houses of the United States Congress.

Richard H. Lehman

Richard Lehman
In 1994, Lehman was swept from office in the Republican Revolution, losing to Republican George Radanovich by a 17-point margin—one of the largest margins of defeat for an incumbent in that cycle.

Roger Wicker

Roger F. WickerWickerWicker, Roger
Assuming office in 1995, he was President of the freshman class, which included 53 other new Republican Congressmen, elected as part of the 1994 "Republican Revolution".