Rerun

rerunsre-runrepeatrepeatssecond runrebroadcastre-airedrepeatedre-ranClassic TV series
A rerun or repeat is a rebroadcast of an episode of a radio or television program.wikipedia
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Broadcast syndication

syndicatedsyndicationfirst-run syndication
There are two types of reruns – those that occur during a hiatus, and those that occur when a program is syndicated.
The three main types of syndication are "first-run syndication", which is programming that is broadcast for the first time as a syndicated show and is made specifically to sell directly into syndication; "off-network syndication", which is the licensing of a program that was originally run on network TV or in some cases, first-run syndication (colloquially called a "rerun"); and "public broadcasting syndication".

Desi Arnaz

DesiDesi Arnaz, Sr.Desi Arnez
When used to refer to the rebroadcast of a single episode, Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz are generally credited as the inventors of the rerun; it was first utilized for the American television series I Love Lucy (1951–57) during Ball's pregnancy.
Arnaz and Ball are generally credited as the innovators of the syndicated rerun, which they pioneered with the I Love Lucy series.

Dayparting

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Reruns can also be, as the case with more popular shows, when a show is aired outside its timeslot (for example, in the afternoon).
Cable and satellite channels, most of which cater to smaller niche audiences, generally use much simpler programming strategies: infomercials in the morning, reruns (often in block or marathon format) in the daytime, and feature programming in prime time, replayed in late night (though this structure varies, some channels may opt not to lease out certain time periods to infomercials and program overnight and morning time periods with entertainment programs instead).

100 episodes

100th episodeenough episodes100th overall episode
Often about 100 episodes (four to five seasons' worth) are required for a weekly series to be rerun in daily syndication (at least four times a week).
In the U.S. television industry, 100 episodes is the traditional threshold for a television series to enter syndicated reruns.

Residual (entertainment industry)

residualsresidualresidual payments
This situation went unchanged until the mid-1970s, when contracts for new shows extended residual payments for the performers, regardless of the number of reruns, while tape recycling effectively came to an end (rapid advancements in digital video in the 1990s made preservation far more economical) and the Copyright Act of 1976 extended copyright terms to much longer lengths, eliminating the need for renewal.
Residuals are royalties that are paid to the actors, film or television directors, and others involved in making TV shows and movies in cases of reruns, syndication, DVD release, or online streaming release.

I Love Lucy

colorizations of ''I Love Lucycolorized a number of episodesI Love Laquita
When used to refer to the rebroadcast of a single episode, Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz are generally credited as the inventors of the rerun; it was first utilized for the American television series I Love Lucy (1951–57) during Ball's pregnancy.
Unexpectedly the rebroadcasts proved to be ratings winners, effectively giving birth to the rerun, which would later lead to the profitable development of the rerun syndication market.

Broadcast programming

television programmingtimeslotprogramming
A rerun or repeat is a rebroadcast of an episode of a radio or television program.
Shows that are syndicated in this way generally have to have run for several seasons (the rule of thumb is usually 100 episodes) in order to have enough episodes to run without significant repeats.

Kinescope

telerecordingkinescopestelerecorded
However, television networks in the United States began making kinescope recordings of shows broadcast live from the East Coast.
The I Love Lucy decision introduced reruns to most of the American television audience, and set a pattern for the syndication of TV shows after their network runs (and later, for first-run airings via syndication).

TBS (American TV channel)

TBSWTBSTBS Superstation
On cable and satellite, channels that devote at least some of their program schedule to post-syndication reruns include Nick at Nite, TV Land, TBS, USA Network, WGN America, Pop, Discovery Family, Game Show Network, Boomerang, Nicktoons, INSP, RFD-TV, and the Hallmark Channel.
Under Rice, WJRJ – the first independent station to begin operation in the Atlanta market since WQXI-TV (channel 36, allocation now occupied by MyNetworkTV affiliate WATL) ceased operations on May 31, 1955 – operated on a shoestring budget, general entertainment format with a schedule consisting of a few off-network reruns (such as Father Knows Best, The Danny Thomas Show, The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet and The Rifleman) and older feature films as well as a 15-minute news program.

Patterns (Kraft Television Theatre)

Patterns1955Patterns'' (''Kraft Television Theatre'')
Rod Serling's 1955 teleplay Patterns was credited with proving reruns' viability; buoyed by strong word of mouth, the rerun of Patterns drew more viewers than the first run as people who had missed the first airing a month prior tuned in to catch the re-airing.
Patterns was seen from 9 to 10pm Wednesday over the National Broadcasting Company's network; a repeat performance at an early date should be mandatory.

WGN America

Superstation WGNWGNsuperstation feed
On cable and satellite, channels that devote at least some of their program schedule to post-syndication reruns include Nick at Nite, TV Land, TBS, USA Network, WGN America, Pop, Discovery Family, Game Show Network, Boomerang, Nicktoons, INSP, RFD-TV, and the Hallmark Channel.
This left WGN-TV with the faltering DuMont until that network completed its operational wind-down in August 1956, at which time it became an independent station; at that time, off-network syndicated reruns (such as The Cisco Kid, Our Miss Brooks and My Little Margie) were added to the schedule.

MeTV

Me-TVMeTV FMMe-TV Network
Since the early 2010s, the growth of digital subchannel networks has allowed for increasing specialization of these classic networks: in addition to general-interest program networks such as MeTV, Logo TV, Retro TV and Antenna TV, there exist networks solely for sitcoms (Laff), game shows (Buzzr), black-oriented programs (Bounce TV), children's programming (PBJ, Qubo), true crime and court programming (Justice Network), and feature films (Movies!, getTV and This TV).
Through its ownership by Weigel, MeTV is sister to three other networks that source their programming content from the network's distributors: rerun-focused networks Heroes & Icons and Decades (the latter operated as a joint venture with CBS Television Stations), the film-focused Movies! (a joint venture with Fox Television Stations) and the drama-focused Start TV.

INSP (TV channel)

INSPThe Inspiration NetworkThe Inspiration Network (INSP)
On cable and satellite, channels that devote at least some of their program schedule to post-syndication reruns include Nick at Nite, TV Land, TBS, USA Network, WGN America, Pop, Discovery Family, Game Show Network, Boomerang, Nicktoons, INSP, RFD-TV, and the Hallmark Channel.
A part of INSP's re-branding in 2010 included the addition of reruns of popular family-oriented secular shows, specials and movies.

RFD-TV

RFD TVRFDRFDTV
On cable and satellite, channels that devote at least some of their program schedule to post-syndication reruns include Nick at Nite, TV Land, TBS, USA Network, WGN America, Pop, Discovery Family, Game Show Network, Boomerang, Nicktoons, INSP, RFD-TV, and the Hallmark Channel.
The remainder of the daytime and evening schedule consists of horse-related magazines, coverage of rodeo and other Western sports, rural lifestyle programs, reruns of classic television programs with rural appeal, and music programs centered around country music, polka and Southern gospel.

Saturday-morning cartoon

Saturday morning cartoonSaturday morningSaturday morning animated series
Game shows, variety shows, Saturday morning cartoons and, to a lesser extent, newsmagazines, tabloid talk shows and late-night talk shows (often in edited form) have been seen less commonly in reruns; game shows can quickly become dated because of inflation, while talk shows often draw humor from contemporary events.
Until the late 1960s, a number of Saturday-morning cartoons were reruns of animated series originally made for prime time during a brief flurry of such series a few years earlier.

Digital subchannel

subchanneldigital multicastsubchannels
Since the early 2010s, the growth of digital subchannel networks has allowed for increasing specialization of these classic networks: in addition to general-interest program networks such as MeTV, Logo TV, Retro TV and Antenna TV, there exist networks solely for sitcoms (Laff), game shows (Buzzr), black-oriented programs (Bounce TV), children's programming (PBJ, Qubo), true crime and court programming (Justice Network), and feature films (Movies!, getTV and This TV). With the growing availability of cable and satellite television channels as well as over-the-air digital subchannels, combined with a growing body of available post-syndication programming, a handful of specialty channels have been built solely or primarily to run former network programming which otherwise would no longer be in syndication.
Since the late 2000s, entertainment-based specialty networks (also known as diginets) have been created specifically for subchannels, most commonly those dedicated to airing reruns of classic television series (such as Me-TV, the Retro Television Network, Cozi TV and Antenna TV) and movies (such as This TV, GetTV and Movies!).

Evergreen (journalism)

evergreenevergreen contentnot time sensitive
Such shows are more likely to be considered evergreen content that can be rerun for a long period of time without losing its cultural relevance.
Evergreen television shows are ideal for reruns.

Soap opera

soap operassoapdaytime drama
An exception is soap operas, which are either on all year round (for example, EastEnders and Coronation Street), or are on for a season similar to the American format.
Soap operas quickly became a fixture of American daytime television in the early 1950s, joined by game shows, sitcom reruns and talk shows.

Gold (UK TV channel)

GoldUK GoldUKTV Gold
Nowadays there are many channels in the UK (for example, Gold) which repackage and rebroadcast "classic" programming from both sides of the Atlantic.
It shows repeats of classic programming from the BBC and other broadcasters.

ESPN Classic

Classic Sports NetworkESPNESPN Classic Sports Europe
Reruns of sports broadcasts, which face many of the same issues reality shows face, have found a niche, and networks such as MSG Network, ESPN Classic and NFL Network currently have a significant portion of programming time devoted to reruns of live sportscasts.
By 2011, ESPN Classic drifted toward a mix of reruns of entertainment series in prime time, and movies (mostly ESPN Films productions and documentaries such as the 30 for 30 series) making up the majority of the channel's weekend schedule.

Antenna TV

AntennaAntTVAnt TV
Since the early 2010s, the growth of digital subchannel networks has allowed for increasing specialization of these classic networks: in addition to general-interest program networks such as MeTV, Logo TV, Retro TV and Antenna TV, there exist networks solely for sitcoms (Laff), game shows (Buzzr), black-oriented programs (Bounce TV), children's programming (PBJ, Qubo), true crime and court programming (Justice Network), and feature films (Movies!, getTV and This TV).

First run (filmmaking)

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* First run
Some older, smaller, or poorly outfitted neighborhood or discount theatres, or those in less desirable locations, specialize in showing films during their second run.

Hiatus (television)

hiatuson hiatushiatuses
There are two types of reruns – those that occur during a hiatus, and those that occur when a program is syndicated.

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
In the United Kingdom, the word "repeat" refers only to a single episode; "rerun" or "rerunning" is the preferred term for an entire series/season.

Reprint

reprintsre-printsmovie edition
The term "rerun" can also be used in some respects as a synonym for reprint, the equivalent term for print items; this is especially true for print items that are part of ongoing series (such as comic strips; Peanuts, for instance, has been in reruns since the retirement and death of creator Charles M. Schulz).