Resource mobilization

resource mobilization theorymobilizationmobilize changeResource Mobilization and Management
Resource mobilization is the process of getting resources from resource provider, using different mechanisms, to implement an organization's pre-determined goals.wikipedia
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Collective action

collective action problemscollective action problemact collectively
The entrepreneurial model explains collective action as a result of economics factors and organization theory.
Moving beyond RDT, scholars suggested that in addition to a sense of injustice, people must also have the objective, structural resources necessary to mobilize change through social protest.

Social movement

social movementsmovementsocial
It is a major sociological theory in the study of social movements which emerged in the 1970s.
Resource mobilization theory emphasizes the importance of resources in social movement development and success.

John D. McCarthy

He has contributed to the research of social movement and resource mobilization theory.

Sociological theory

sociologicalsociological paradigmTheoretical sociology
It is a major sociological theory in the study of social movements which emerged in the 1970s.

Political opportunity

political processplay into the reformers' handspolitical process theory
Coupled with political process theory, a social movement theory which posits that social movements either succeed or fail due to political opportunities, MoveOn.org has been a successful tool because of its accessibility, which would make people more likely to start a petition and move toward a common goal.
MoveOn.org can also be applied to resource mobilization theory due to the fact that MoveOn.org is a site that is meant to assemble people, which adds to the strength and success of the organization.

Mayer Zald

Mayer N. Zald
With John D. McCarthy, Zald developed the resource mobilization theory, which became one of the major theories on social movements.

Mass mobilization

social mobilizationpolitical mobilizationmass mobilisation

Mobilization

mobilizedmobilisationmobilised
It emphasizes the ability of a movement's members to 1) acquire resources and to 2) mobilize people towards accomplishing the movement's goals.

Collective behavior

Behavioral sociologycollective behaviourbehavior theory
In contrast to the traditional collective behaviour theory that views social movements as deviant and irrational, resource mobilization sees them as rational social institutions, created and populated by social actors with a goal of taking political action.

Deviance (sociology)

deviancedeviantdeviant behavior
In contrast to the traditional collective behaviour theory that views social movements as deviant and irrational, resource mobilization sees them as rational social institutions, created and populated by social actors with a goal of taking political action.

Institution

institutionsinstitutionalsocial institutions
In contrast to the traditional collective behaviour theory that views social movements as deviant and irrational, resource mobilization sees them as rational social institutions, created and populated by social actors with a goal of taking political action.

Agency (sociology)

agencysocial actoragents
In contrast to the traditional collective behaviour theory that views social movements as deviant and irrational, resource mobilization sees them as rational social institutions, created and populated by social actors with a goal of taking political action.

Social actions

social actionpolitical actionaction
In contrast to the traditional collective behaviour theory that views social movements as deviant and irrational, resource mobilization sees them as rational social institutions, created and populated by social actors with a goal of taking political action.

Social movement organization

social movement organisationCivil Society Organisationsmovement-based organization
According to resource mobilization theory, a core, professional group in a social movement organization works towards bringing money, supporters, attention of the media, alliances with those in power, and refining the organizational structure.

Rational choice theory

rational choicechoice theoryrational
This theory assumes that individuals are rational: individuals weigh the costs and benefits of movement participation and act only if benefits outweigh costs. The laws of supply and demand explain the flow of resources to and from the movements, and that individual actions (or lack thereof) is accounted for by rational choice theory.

Public good (economics)

public goodpublic goodssocial goods
When movement goals take the form of public goods, the free rider dilemma has to be taken into consideration.

Free-rider problem

free rider problemfree ridersfree riding
When movement goals take the form of public goods, the free rider dilemma has to be taken into consideration.

Goal orientation

goal-orientedGoal-directedgoal-driven
Social movements are goal-oriented, but organization is more important than resources.

Infrastructure

infrastructuralinfrastructuresurban infrastructure
Efficiency of the organization infrastructure is a key resource in itself.

Economics

economiceconomisteconomic theory
The entrepreneurial model explains collective action as a result of economics factors and organization theory.

Organizational theory

organizational theoristorganization theorybusiness theorist
The entrepreneurial model explains collective action as a result of economics factors and organization theory.

Supply and demand

demandsupplylaw of supply and demand
The laws of supply and demand explain the flow of resources to and from the movements, and that individual actions (or lack thereof) is accounted for by rational choice theory.

Social constructionism

social constructionsocially constructedsocial constructionist
In the 1980s, other theories of social movements such as social constructionism and new social movement theory challenged the resource mobilization framework.

New social movements

new social movementnew social movement theorynew left movements
In the 1980s, other theories of social movements such as social constructionism and new social movement theory challenged the resource mobilization framework.