Respirator

respiratorsairline respiratorFace maskpollution maskprotective maskAir filtration maskcharcoal respiratorface masksFilter maskFilter style
A respirator is a device designed to protect the wearer from inhaling hazardous atmospheres, including particulate matter such as dusts and airborne microorganisms, as well as hazardous fumes, vapours and gases.wikipedia
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Gas mask

gas masksgasmaskgas-mask
Air-purifying respirators range from relatively inexpensive single-use, disposable face masks sometimes referred to as a dust mask to more robust reusable models with replaceable cartridges often called a gas mask.
Most gas masks are also respirators, though the word gas mask is often used to refer to military equipment (e.g. field protective mask).

John Stenhouse

Stenhouse
Inventors in Europe included John Stenhouse, a Scottish chemist, who investigated the power of charcoal in its various forms, to capture and hold large volumes of gas.
In 1854, he invented one of the first practical respirators.

Jean-François Pilâtre de Rozier

Pilâtre de RozierPierre RomainJ. F. Pilâtre de Rozier
In 1785, Jean-François Pilâtre de Rozier invented a respirator.
He researched the new field of gases, and invented a respirator.

Respirator assigned protection factors

Assigned Protection Factorslevel of protection it would providerespirator
The differences in respirator design impact the respirator assigned protection factors, i.e. the resulting degree of protection which kind of hazard.
The respiratory protective devices (RPD) can protect workers only if their protective properties are adequate to the conditions in the workplace.

John Tyndall

TyndallJohn Tyndall FellowshipJ Tyndall
British physicist John Tyndall took Stenhouse's mask, added a filter of cotton wool saturated with lime, glycerin, and charcoal, and in 1871 invented a 'fireman's respirator', a hood that filtered smoke and gas from air, which he exhibited at a meeting of the Royal Society in London in 1874.

Dust mask

respiratory masks
Air-purifying respirators range from relatively inexpensive single-use, disposable face masks sometimes referred to as a dust mask to more robust reusable models with replaceable cartridges often called a gas mask.
Dust masks are a cheaper, lighter, and possibly more comfortable alternative to respirators, but may not provide as much protection, and may be more susceptible to misuse or poor fit.

Particulates

particulate matterparticulatefine particulate matter
A respirator is a device designed to protect the wearer from inhaling hazardous atmospheres, including particulate matter such as dusts and airborne microorganisms, as well as hazardous fumes, vapours and gases.

Activated carbon

activated charcoalactive carbonactive charcoal
He built one of the first respirators able to remove toxic gases from the air, paving the way for activated charcoal to become the most widely used filter for respirators.
Activated carbon is used in methane and hydrogen storage, air purification, solvent recovery, decaffeination, gold purification, metal extraction, water purification, medicine, sewage treatment, air filters in gas masks and respirators, filters in compressed air, teeth whitening, production of hydrogen chloride in dark and many other applications.

Powered air-purifying respirator

PAPRPowered Air Purifying Respiratoractive (powered)
Powered air-purifying respirator (PAPRs) take contaminated air, remove a certain quantity of pollutants and return the air to the user.
PAPRs consist of a respirator in the form of a hood, or full-face mask, which takes ambient air that is contaminated with one or more type of pollutant or pathogen, actively removes (filters) a sufficient proportion of these hazards, and then delivers the clean air to the user's face and/or mouth.

Workplace respirator testing

Respirators testing in the workplacesat the workplacesRPD
The very limited field tests of air-purifying respirator performance in the workplace show that respirators may perform far less well under actual use conditions than is indicated by laboratory fit factors.
To protect workers from air contaminants, employers often utilized respirators in the workplace.

Respirator fit test

fit testingfit-testingfit factors
The very limited field tests of air-purifying respirator performance in the workplace show that respirators may perform far less well under actual use conditions than is indicated by laboratory fit factors.
A respirator fit test checks whether a respirator properly fits the face of someone who wears it.

Hierarchy of hazard controls

hierarchy of hazard controlhazard controlshierarchy of controls
In contrast, we can predict the effectiveness of engineering controls, and we can monitor their performance with commercially available state-of-the-art devices.
Personal protective equipment (PPE) includes gloves, Nomex/Uniform, respirators, hard hats, safety glasses, high-visibility clothing, and safety footwear.

Air filter

filterair cleanerair filters
Full hood, half- or full-facepiece designs are marketed in many varieties depending on the hazard of concern using an air filter which acts passively on air inhaled by the wearer.

Pliny the Elder

PlinyPlin.Plinius
The history of protective respiratory equipment can be traced back as far as the first century, when Pliny the Elder (circa A.D. 23-79) described using animal bladder skins to protect workers in Roman mines from red lead oxide dust.

Leonardo da Vinci

Da VinciLeonardoLéonard de Vinci
In the 16th century, Leonardo da Vinci suggested that a finely woven cloth dipped in water could protect sailors from a toxic weapon made of powder that he had designed.

Alexander von Humboldt

HumboldtHumb.Alexander Humboldt
Alexander von Humboldt introduced a primitive respirator in 1799 when he worked as a mining engineer in Prussia.

Natural rubber

rubberIndia rubbercaoutchouc
Some were rubber, some were made of rubberized fabric, and still others of impregnated fabric, but in most cases a tank of compressed air or a reservoir of air under slight pressure was carried by the wearer to supply the necessary breathing air.

Carbon dioxide

CO 2 CO2carbon dioxide (CO 2 )
In some devices certain means were provided for the adsorption of carbon dioxide in exhaled air and the rebreathing of the same air many times; in other cases valves allowed exhalation of used air.

Lewis Haslett

Lewis P. Haslett
In 1848, the first US patent for an air purifying respirator was granted to Lewis P. Haslett for his 'Haslett's Lung Protector,' which filtered dust from the air using one-way clapper valves and a filter made of moistened wool or a similar porous substance.

Porosity

porousporepores
In 1848, the first US patent for an air purifying respirator was granted to Lewis P. Haslett for his 'Haslett's Lung Protector,' which filtered dust from the air using one-way clapper valves and a filter made of moistened wool or a similar porous substance.

Calcium hydroxide

slaked limelimehydrated lime
British physicist John Tyndall took Stenhouse's mask, added a filter of cotton wool saturated with lime, glycerin, and charcoal, and in 1871 invented a 'fireman's respirator', a hood that filtered smoke and gas from air, which he exhibited at a meeting of the Royal Society in London in 1874.

Glycerol

glyceringlycerineE422
British physicist John Tyndall took Stenhouse's mask, added a filter of cotton wool saturated with lime, glycerin, and charcoal, and in 1871 invented a 'fireman's respirator', a hood that filtered smoke and gas from air, which he exhibited at a meeting of the Royal Society in London in 1874.

Royal Society

FRSRoyal Society of LondonThe Royal Society
British physicist John Tyndall took Stenhouse's mask, added a filter of cotton wool saturated with lime, glycerin, and charcoal, and in 1871 invented a 'fireman's respirator', a hood that filtered smoke and gas from air, which he exhibited at a meeting of the Royal Society in London in 1874.

Brooklyn Fire Department

Brooklyn
Also in 1874, Samuel Barton patented a device that 'permitted respiration in places where the atmosphere is charged with noxious gases, or vapors, smoke, or other impurities.' German Bernhard Loeb patented several inventions to 'purify foul or vitiated air,' and counted the Brooklyn Fire Department among his customers.