Restenosis

coronary restenosisre-stenosisrestenotic
Restenosis is the recurrence of stenosis, a narrowing of a blood vessel, leading to restricted blood flow.wikipedia
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Stenosis

stricturestricturesnarrowing
Restenosis is the recurrence of stenosis, a narrowing of a blood vessel, leading to restricted blood flow.
Restenosis is the recurrence of stenosis after a procedure.

Angioplasty

balloon angioplastyangioplastiespercutaneous transluminal angioplasty
Procedures frequently used to treat the vascular damage from atherosclerosis and related narrowing and renarrowing (restenosis) of blood vessels include vascular surgery, cardiac surgery, and angioplasty. Angioplasty, also called percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), is commonly used to treat blockages of the coronary or peripheral arteries (such as in the limbs). A stent is a mesh, tube-like structure often used in conjunction with angioplasty to permanently hold open an artery, allowing for unrestricted blood flow, or to support a weakness in the artery wall called an aneurysm.
Angioplasty may also provide a less durable treatment for atherosclerosis and be more prone to restenosis relative to vascular bypass or coronary artery bypass grafting.

Percutaneous coronary intervention

coronary angioplastyPCIpercutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty
Angioplasty, also called percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), is commonly used to treat blockages of the coronary or peripheral arteries (such as in the limbs).
Brachytherapy (use of radioactive source to inhibit restenosis)

Drug-eluting stent

drug eluting stentdrug-eluting stentsdrug-eluting
Drug-eluting stents are now being trialled in Europe, Canada and the USA, as well as in Asia-Pacific. A 2010 study in India comparing coronary drug-eluting stents (DES) with coronary bare-metal stents (BMS) reported that restenosis developed in 23.1% of DES patients vs 48.8% in BMS patients, and female sex was found to be a statistically significant risk factor for developing restenosis.
This prevents fibrosis that, together with clots (thrombi), could otherwise block the stented artery, a process called restenosis.

Neointimal hyperplasia

This is also known as Neointimal Hyperplasia (NIHA).
Neointimal hyperplasia is the major cause of restenosis after percutaneous coronary interventions such as stenting or angioplasty.

Bare-metal stent

A 2010 study in India comparing coronary drug-eluting stents (DES) with coronary bare-metal stents (BMS) reported that restenosis developed in 23.1% of DES patients vs 48.8% in BMS patients, and female sex was found to be a statistically significant risk factor for developing restenosis.
Drug-eluting stents are often preferred over bare-metal stents because the latter carry a higher risk of restenosis, the growth of tissue into the stent resulting in vessel narrowing.

Stent

stentsstent graftstenting
A stent is a mesh, tube-like structure often used in conjunction with angioplasty to permanently hold open an artery, allowing for unrestricted blood flow, or to support a weakness in the artery wall called an aneurysm.
It was used as a scaffold to prevent the vessel from closing and to avoid restenosis in coronary surgery—a condition where scar tissue grows within the stent and interferes with vascular flow.

Blood vessel

vascularblood vesselsintravascular
Restenosis is the recurrence of stenosis, a narrowing of a blood vessel, leading to restricted blood flow. Restenosis usually pertains to an artery or other large blood vessel that has become narrowed, received treatment to clear the blockage and subsequently become renarrowed.

Organ (anatomy)

organorgansviscera
This is usually restenosis of an artery, or other blood vessel, or possibly a vessel within an organ.

Atherosclerosis

atheroscleroticatherogenesisatherosclerotic plaques
Procedures frequently used to treat the vascular damage from atherosclerosis and related narrowing and renarrowing (restenosis) of blood vessels include vascular surgery, cardiac surgery, and angioplasty. The balloon inserted into the narrowing ‘smashes’ the cholesterol plaques (atherosclerosis) against the artery walls, thus widening the size of the lumen and increasing blood flow.

Vascular surgery

vascular surgeonvascularvascular surgeons
Procedures frequently used to treat the vascular damage from atherosclerosis and related narrowing and renarrowing (restenosis) of blood vessels include vascular surgery, cardiac surgery, and angioplasty.

Cardiac surgery

open heart surgeryheart surgeryopen-heart surgery
Procedures frequently used to treat the vascular damage from atherosclerosis and related narrowing and renarrowing (restenosis) of blood vessels include vascular surgery, cardiac surgery, and angioplasty.

Angina

angina pectorischest painstable angina
For instance, a coronary stent patient who develops restenosis may experience recurrent chest pain (angina) or suffer from a minor or major heart attack (myocardial infarction), though they may not report it. This is why it is important that a patient comply with follow-up screenings and the clinician follows through with a thorough clinical assessment.

Myocardial infarction

heart attackheart attacksacute myocardial infarction
For instance, a coronary stent patient who develops restenosis may experience recurrent chest pain (angina) or suffer from a minor or major heart attack (myocardial infarction), though they may not report it. This is why it is important that a patient comply with follow-up screenings and the clinician follows through with a thorough clinical assessment.

Coronary arteries

coronary arterycoronaryarteries
Angioplasty, also called percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), is commonly used to treat blockages of the coronary or peripheral arteries (such as in the limbs).

Peripheral vascular system

peripheral veinperipheral arteriesPeripheral Vessels
Angioplasty, also called percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), is commonly used to treat blockages of the coronary or peripheral arteries (such as in the limbs).

Cholesterol

serum cholesteroldietary cholesterolcholesterol level
The balloon inserted into the narrowing ‘smashes’ the cholesterol plaques (atherosclerosis) against the artery walls, thus widening the size of the lumen and increasing blood flow.

Artery

arteriesarterialarterial system
This is usually restenosis of an artery, or other blood vessel, or possibly a vessel within an organ. The balloon inserted into the narrowing ‘smashes’ the cholesterol plaques (atherosclerosis) against the artery walls, thus widening the size of the lumen and increasing blood flow. Restenosis usually pertains to an artery or other large blood vessel that has become narrowed, received treatment to clear the blockage and subsequently become renarrowed.

Lumen (anatomy)

lumenluminallumina
The balloon inserted into the narrowing ‘smashes’ the cholesterol plaques (atherosclerosis) against the artery walls, thus widening the size of the lumen and increasing blood flow.

Physiology

physiologistphysiologicalphysiologically
However the action damages the artery walls, and they respond by using physiological mechanisms to repair the damage.

Aneurysm

aneurysmsaneurismruptured aneurysm
A stent is a mesh, tube-like structure often used in conjunction with angioplasty to permanently hold open an artery, allowing for unrestricted blood flow, or to support a weakness in the artery wall called an aneurysm.

Immune system

immuneimmune responseimmune responses
The artery can react to the stent, perceive it as a foreign body, and respond by mounting an immune system response which leads to further narrowing near or inside the stent.

Injury

traumainjuriesphysical trauma
The first stage that occurs immediately after tissue trauma, is thrombosis.

Thrombosis

blood clotsthromboticblood clot
The first stage that occurs immediately after tissue trauma, is thrombosis.

Thrombus

blood clotblood clotsclot
A blood clot forms at the site of damage and further hinders blood flow.