Resurrection of Jesus

resurrectionResurrection of Christresurrection of Jesus Christresurrectedhis resurrectionThe ResurrectionJesus' resurrectiondeath and resurrection of JesusCrucifixionrisen Christ
The resurrection of Jesus, or anastasis is the Christian belief that God raised Jesus after his crucifixion as first of the dead, starting his exalted life as Christ and Lord.wikipedia
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Jesus

Jesus ChristChristJesus of Nazareth
The resurrection of Jesus, or anastasis is the Christian belief that God raised Jesus after his crucifixion as first of the dead, starting his exalted life as Christ and Lord.
After his death, his followers believed he rose from the dead, and the community they formed eventually became the early Church.

Easter

Easter SundayPaschaEaster Day
In Christian theology, the death and resurrection of Jesus are the most important events, a foundation of the Christian faith, and commemorated by Easter.
Easter, also called Pascha (Greek, Latin) or Resurrection Sunday, is a festival and holiday commemorating the resurrection of Jesus from the dead, described in the New Testament as having occurred on the third day after his burial following his crucifixion by the Romans at Calvary c.

Christianity

ChristianChristiansChristian faith
The resurrection of Jesus, or anastasis is the Christian belief that God raised Jesus after his crucifixion as first of the dead, starting his exalted life as Christ and Lord.
Their creeds generally hold in common Jesus as the Son of God—the logos incarnated—who ministred, suffered, and died on a cross, but rose from the dead for the salvation of mankind; as referred to as the gospel, meaning the "good news", in the Bible (scripture).

Vision theory of Jesus' appearances

Vision hypothesisvisionary experiencesphysical resurrection
In secular and liberal Christian scholarship, the appearances of Jesus are explained as visionary experiences that gave the impetus to the belief in the exaltation of Jesus and a resumption of the missionary activity of Jesus' followers.
The vision theory or vision hypothesis is a term used to cover a range of theories that question the physical resurrection of Jesus, and suggest that sightings of a risen Jesus were visionary experiences.

Crucifixion of Jesus

CrucifixiondeathCrucifixion of Christ
The resurrection of Jesus, or anastasis is the Christian belief that God raised Jesus after his crucifixion as first of the dead, starting his exalted life as Christ and Lord.
All four Gospels conclude with an extended narrative of Jesus' arrest, initial trial at the Sanhedrin and final trial at Pilate's court, where Jesus is flogged, condemned to death, is led to the place of crucifixion initially carrying his cross before Roman soldiers induce Simon of Cyrene to carry it, and then Jesus is crucified, entombed, and resurrected from the dead.

Resurrection of the dead

resurrectionresurrection of the bodyresurrected
Josephus tells of the three main Jewish sects of the 1st century AD, that the Sadducees held that both soul and body perished at death; the Essenes that the soul was immortal but the flesh was not; and the Pharisees that the soul was immortal and that the body would be resurrected to house it.
In the New Testament of the Christian Bible, the three common usages for this term pertain to (1) the resurrection of Jesus; (2) the rising from the dead of all men, at the end of this present age and (3) the resurrection of certain ones in history, who were restored to life.

Christian theology

Christian doctrineChristian theologiantheology
In Christian theology, the death and resurrection of Jesus are the most important events, a foundation of the Christian faith, and commemorated by Easter.
Core biblical teachings about the person of Jesus Christ may be summarized that Jesus Christ was and forever is fully God (divine) and fully human in one sinless person at the same time, and that through the death and resurrection of Jesus, sinful humans can be reconciled to God and thereby are offered salvation and the promise of eternal life via his New Covenant.

Mary Magdalene

St Mary MagdaleneMary MagdalenSaint Mary Magdalene
Jesus then appears to Mary Magdalene and "the other Mary" at the tomb; and next, based on Mark 16:7, Jesus appears to all the disciples on a mountain in Galilee, where Jesus claims authority over heaven and earth, and commissions the disciples to preach the gospel to the whole world.
Mary Magdalene, sometimes called simply the Magdalene or the Madeleine, was a Jewish woman who, according to the four canonical gospels, traveled with Jesus as one of his followers and was a witness to his crucifixion, burial, and resurrection.

Mark 16

Longer ending of MarkMark 16:8Mark 16:8-20
After his resurrection, Jesus starts proclaiming "eternal salvation" through the disciples Mark 16:8, and subsequently calls the apostles to the Great Commission, as described in,,,, and, in which the disciples receive the call "to let the world know the good news of a victorious Saviour and the very presence of God in the world by the spirit."
There they encounter a young man dressed in white who announces the Resurrection of Jesus.

Gospel of Luke

LukeLuke's GospelBook of Luke
In the Gospel of Luke, "the woman who had come with him from Galilee" come to his tomb, which they find empty.
It tells of the origins, birth, ministry, death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus Christ.

Post-Resurrection appearances of Jesus

Resurrection appearances of Jesusresurrectionappearance of Jesus
The accounts of the Gospels, including the empty tomb and the appearances of the risen Jesus to his followers, have been interpreted and analyzed in diverse ways, and have been seen variously as historical accounts of a literal event, as accurate accounts of visionary experiences, as non-literal eschatological parables, and as fabrications of early Christian writers, among various other interpretations.
Believers point to them as evidence of his resurrection and identity as Messiah, seated in heaven on the right hand of God (the doctrine of the Exaltation of Christ).

Swoon hypothesis

did not die on the crosssurvival from the crossswoon theory
One hypothesis, for example, that Jesus did not die on the cross, that the empty tomb was the result of Jesus' body having been stolen, or, as was common with Roman crucifixions, that Jesus was never entombed.
The swoon hypothesis is any of a number of ideas that aim to explain the resurrection of Jesus, proposing that Jesus did not die on the cross, but merely fell unconscious ("swooned"), and was later revived in the tomb in the same mortal body.

Ascension of Jesus

AscensionAscension DayAscension of Christ
According to the New Testament, "God raised him from the dead", he ascended to heaven, to the "right hand of God", and will return again to fulfill the rest of Messianic prophecy such as the resurrection of the dead, the Last Judgment and establishment of the Kingdom of God. In Acts of the Apostles, Jesus appears to apostles for forty days, and commands them to stay in Jerusalem whereafter Jesus ascends to heaven, followed by the coming of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost, and the missionary task of the early church.
In the Christian tradition, reflected in the major Christian creeds and confessional statements, God exalted Jesus after his death, raising Him as first of the dead, and taking Him to heaven, where Jesus took his seat at the right hand of God.

Empty tomb

Garden of the Empty Tombtombburied
The accounts of the Gospels, including the empty tomb and the appearances of the risen Jesus to his followers, have been interpreted and analyzed in diverse ways, and have been seen variously as historical accounts of a literal event, as accurate accounts of visionary experiences, as non-literal eschatological parables, and as fabrications of early Christian writers, among various other interpretations.
Instead, they met with an angel who told them that Jesus had been raised from the dead.

Stolen body hypothesis

Jesus' body having been stolenclaims that the disciples stole the bodydisciples stole Jesus's corpse
One hypothesis, for example, that Jesus did not die on the cross, that the empty tomb was the result of Jesus' body having been stolen, or, as was common with Roman crucifixions, that Jesus was never entombed.
His tomb was found empty not because he was resurrected, but because the body had been hidden somewhere else by the apostles or unknown persons.

Gospel of Mark

MarkMark's GospelGospel according to Mark
The Gospel of Mark, written c. 65–75, ends with the discovery of the empty tomb by Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome.
The gospel ends, in its original version, with the discovery of the empty tomb, a promise to meet again in Galilee, and an unheeded instruction to spread the good news of the resurrection.

Salvation in Christianity

atonementsalvationAtonement in Christianity
After his resurrection, Jesus starts proclaiming "eternal salvation" through the disciples Mark 16:8, and subsequently calls the apostles to the Great Commission, as described in,,,, and, in which the disciples receive the call "to let the world know the good news of a victorious Saviour and the very presence of God in the world by the spirit."
Salvation in Christianity, also called deliverance, or redemption, is the "saving [of] human beings from death and separation from God" by Christ's death and resurrection, and the justification following this salvation.

Session of Christ

exaltationExaltation of Christexaltation of Jesus
According to the New Testament, "God raised him from the dead", he ascended to heaven, to the "right hand of God", and will return again to fulfill the rest of Messianic prophecy such as the resurrection of the dead, the Last Judgment and establishment of the Kingdom of God.
According to the Book of Acts, after Jesus' resurrection and ascension, he was "exalted to the right hand of God."

Gospel of John

JohnJohn's GospelFourth Gospel
In the Gospel of John, Mary Magdalene finds the tomb empty, and informs Peter.
The structure is highly schematic: there are seven "signs" culminating in the raising of Lazarus (foreshadowing the resurrection of Jesus), and seven "I am" sayings and discourses, culminating in Thomas's proclamation of the risen Jesus as "my Lord and my God" (the same title, dominus et deus, claimed by the Emperor Domitian, an indication of the date of composition).

Pentecost

Pentecost SundayWhitsundayDay of Pentecost
In Acts of the Apostles, Jesus appears to apostles for forty days, and commands them to stay in Jerusalem whereafter Jesus ascends to heaven, followed by the coming of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost, and the missionary task of the early church.
Peter's sermon in stresses the resurrection and exaltation.

Adoptionism

AdoptionistAdoptionistsadopted
It has long been argued that the New Testament writings contain two different Christologies, namely a "low" or adoptionist Christology, and a "high" or "incarnation Christology."
Adoptionism, also called dynamic monarchianism, is a Christian nontrinitarian theological doctrine which holds that Jesus was adopted as the Son of God at his baptism, his resurrection, or his ascension.

Paul the Apostle

PaulSaint PaulSt. Paul
The earliest surviving Christian writings are the letters of Paul, written between 50–57 (or possibly 48–57).
In the narrative of Acts, Paul was traveling on the road from Jerusalem to Damascus on a mission to "arrest them and bring them back to Jerusalem" when the resurrected Jesus appeared to him in a great light.

Gary Habermas

Gary R. Habermas
According to New Testament scholar Gary Habermas, "Many other scholars have spoken in support of a bodily notion of Jesus’ resurrection."
Gary Robert Habermas (born 1950) is an American historian, New Testament scholar, philosopher of religion, and Christian apologist who frequently writes and lectures on the resurrection of Jesus.

Baptism of Jesus

baptismBaptism of Christhis baptism
Mark shifted the moment of when Jesus became the son to the baptism of Jesus, and later still Matthew and Luke shifted it to the moment of the divine conception, and finally John declared that Jesus had been with God from the beginning: "In the beginning was the Word".
The baptism is one of the events in the gospel narrative of the life of Jesus; others include the Transfiguration, Crucifixion, Resurrection, and Ascension.

Book of Daniel

DanielThe Book of DanielDan
The idea of any resurrection at all first emerges clearly in the 2nd-century BC Book of Daniel, but as a belief in the resurrection of the soul alone.
Without this belief, Christianity, in which the resurrection of Jesus plays a central role, would have disappeared, like the movements following other charismatic Jewish figures of the 1st century.