Retransmission consent

compensationretransmissionrenew its carriageincrease in payments to transmit the stations' signalscompensation for their carriagecompensation from distributorsconsentdemanded $150 million a yearpermission to broadcastrebroadcast fee
Retransmission consent is a provision of the 1992 United States Cable Television Consumer Protection and Competition Act that requires cable operators and other multichannel video programming distributors (MVPDs) to obtain permission from commercial broadcasters before carrying their programming.wikipedia
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Cable Television Consumer Protection and Competition Act of 1992

Cable Television Consumer Protection and Competition ActCable Television Protection and Competition Actterrestrial loophole
Retransmission consent is a provision of the 1992 United States Cable Television Consumer Protection and Competition Act that requires cable operators and other multichannel video programming distributors (MVPDs) to obtain permission from commercial broadcasters before carrying their programming.
Television stations could opt out of cable carriage by invoking retransmission consent.

Multichannel television in the United States

multichannel video programming distributorMVPDpay television
Retransmission consent is a provision of the 1992 United States Cable Television Consumer Protection and Competition Act that requires cable operators and other multichannel video programming distributors (MVPDs) to obtain permission from commercial broadcasters before carrying their programming.
However, commercial stations have the option to opt-out of must-carry, and require financial compensation for their carriage instead.

FX (TV channel)

FXFX NetworkFX Networks
America's Talking (now MSNBC), FX, and ESPN2 all originated through retransmission consent deals in the early 1990s.
On October 1, 2010, parent company News Corporation (which spun off FX and the company's other U.S.-based entertainment properties to 21st Century Fox in July 2013) pulled its channels from Dish Network due to a carriage dispute over retransmission consent revenue.

Carriage dispute

disputecarriage disputescarriage
Among its provisions, the act mandated that distributors must carry local stations who make their signal available for free, but must also get retransmission consent before a signal can be retransmitted.

Fee-for-carriage

carriage feesfee for cable carriage
Such a system has long existed in the United States, under the name of retransmission consent.

Must-carry

must carrymandatory carriageretransmission
Retransmission consent was adopted in response to the "must carry" rules that required cable operators to carry all significantly viewed local stations.
But note that must-carry is an option of the station and the station may, in lieu of must-carry, negotiate license fees as part of a retransmission consent agreement.

Significantly viewed out-of-market television stations in the United States

significantly viewedout-of-market" stationsSignificantly viewed out of market TV stations in the United States

Cable television

cablecable TVcable channel
Retransmission consent is a provision of the 1992 United States Cable Television Consumer Protection and Competition Act that requires cable operators and other multichannel video programming distributors (MVPDs) to obtain permission from commercial broadcasters before carrying their programming.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
In the United States, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) regulates this area of business and public policy pursuant to 47 U.S.C. Part II.

Federal Communications Commission

FCCU.S. Federal Communications CommissionFederal Communications Commission (FCC)
In the United States, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) regulates this area of business and public policy pursuant to 47 U.S.C. Part II.

Regulation

regulationsregulatorygovernment regulation
In the United States, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) regulates this area of business and public policy pursuant to 47 U.S.C. Part II.

John C. Malone

John MaloneJohn Malone’sMalone Family Foundation
John Malone, head of cable giant TeleCommunications Inc.

Tele-Communications Inc.

TCITele-Communications, Inc.TCI Cable
John Malone, head of cable giant TeleCommunications Inc.

America's Talking

America's Talking (now MSNBC), FX, and ESPN2 all originated through retransmission consent deals in the early 1990s.

MSNBC

MSNBC.comMichael VentreMSNBC Latin America
America's Talking (now MSNBC), FX, and ESPN2 all originated through retransmission consent deals in the early 1990s.

ESPN2

ESPN 22ESPN 2,
America's Talking (now MSNBC), FX, and ESPN2 all originated through retransmission consent deals in the early 1990s.

Robert M. McDowell

Robert McDowell
In a 2013 op-ed, former FCC commissioner, Robert McDowell, argued: TV stations make more money as more people see their shows, thus creating an incentive to distribute their product as widely as possible.

Criticism of ESPN

favorite
ESPN currently charges the highest retransmission consent fee of any major cable television network in the United States.

Regional sports network

RSNregional sports networksregional sports
Regional sports networks are generally among the most expensive channels carried by cable television providers, due to the expense of rights to the local sports they carry; this higher subscriber fees received by television providers through retransmission consent carriage agreements coupled with percentages of other forms of revenue are used to pay local and regional teams for the right to broadcast their games.