Reversal film

slidesphotographic slideslideslide filmtransparenciestransparencyreversalphotographic slidescolor reversalcolor transparency film
In photography, reversal film is a type of photographic film that produces a positive image on a transparent base.wikipedia
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Photographic printing

printphotographic printprinting
The film is processed to produce transparencies or diapositives (abbreviated as "diafilm" in many countries) instead of negatives and prints.
The paper is exposed to a photographic negative, a positive transparency (or slide), or a digital image file projected using an enlarger or digital exposure unit such as a LightJet printer.

Slide projector

projectionslide projectionslide
A slide is a specially mounted individual transparency intended for projection onto a screen using a slide projector.
A slide projector is an opto-mechanical device for showing photographic slides.

Negative (photography)

negativenegativesphotographic negative
The film is processed to produce transparencies or diapositives (abbreviated as "diafilm" in many countries) instead of negatives and prints.
Some films used in cameras are designed to be developed by reversal processing, which produces the final positive, instead of a negative, on the original film.

Super 8 film

Super 8Super-8Super 8 mm film
Reversal film is sometimes used as motion picture film, mostly in the 16 mm, Super 8 and 8 mm "cine" formats, to yield a positive image on the camera original.
Historically, Super 8 film was a reversal stock for home projection used primarily for the creation of home movies.

Photographic film

filmfilm camerafilms
In photography, reversal film is a type of photographic film that produces a positive image on a transparent base.

Photography

photographerphotographicstill photography
In photography, reversal film is a type of photographic film that produces a positive image on a transparent base.
After an Autochrome plate was reversal processed to produce a positive transparency, the starch grains served to illuminate each fragment with the correct color and the tiny colored points blended together in the eye, synthesizing the color of the subject by the additive method.

Leopold Godowsky Jr.

Leopold Godowsky, Jr.Leopold
Leopold Godowsky, Jr. and Leopold Mannes, working with the Eastman Kodak Company, developed Kodachrome, the first commercially successful color film to use the subtractive method.
Leopold Godowsky Jr. (May 27, 1900 – February 18, 1983) was an American violinist and chemist, who together with Leopold Mannes created the first practical color transparency film, Kodachrome.

Kodachrome

filmKodachrome 64Kodachrome reversal colour film
Leopold Godowsky, Jr. and Leopold Mannes, working with the Eastman Kodak Company, developed Kodachrome, the first commercially successful color film to use the subtractive method.
Kodachrome is the brand name for a color reversal film introduced by Eastman Kodak in 1935.

Leopold Mannes

Leopold Godowsky, Jr. and Leopold Mannes, working with the Eastman Kodak Company, developed Kodachrome, the first commercially successful color film to use the subtractive method.
Leopold Damrosch Mannes (December 26, 1899 – August 11, 1964) was an American musician, who, together with Leopold Godowsky, Jr., created the first practical color transparency film, Kodachrome.

Autochrome Lumière

autochromeautochromesAutochrome Lumiere
The earliest practical and commercially successful color photography reversal process was the Lumière Autochrome, introduced in 1907.
The plate was reversal-processed into a positive transparency — that is, the plate was first developed into a negative image but not "fixed", then the silver forming the negative image was chemically removed, then the remaining silver halide was exposed to light and developed, producing a positive image.

Agfacolor

Ansco ColorAgfacolor NeuAnsco Colour
In late 1936, Agfacolor Neu was launched, Agfa having overcome earlier difficulties with color sensitivity problems.
The new Agfacolor was originally a reversal film used for making "slides", home movies and short documentaries.

E-6 process

E-6process E-6Process E6
All color reversal film sold today is developed with the E-6 process.
The E-6 process (often abbreviated to E-6) is a chromogenic photographic process for developing Ektachrome, Fujichrome and other color reversal (also called slide or transparency) photographic film.

Dufaycolor

Also using the additive principle and reversal processing were the Agfa color screen plates and films and Dufaycolor film, all of which were discontinued by 1961.
Dufaycolor was normally a reversal film which was processed to produce the final positive image, instead of a negative, on the original film.

Dr5 chrome

dr5, or dr5 Chrome, is a reversal black and white process, through which most kinds of black-and-white negative films produce transparencies (slides).

Lightbox

light-boxilluminated boxeslight box
In traditional newsrooms and magazine offices slides were viewed using a lightbox and a loupe, this allowed rapid side by side comparison of similar images.

Instant film

PolaroidPolaroidsPolaroid film
Polaroid produced an instant slide film called Polachrome.
Polavision required a specific camera and tabletop viewer, and was not a commercial success, but did lead to the development of an instant 35 mm color slide film.

Slide library

slide librarianslide librariansVisual resources collection
A slide library is a library that houses a collection of photographic slides, either as a part of a larger library or photo archive, or standing alone within a larger organization, such as an academic department of a college or university, a museum, or a corporation.

Slide show

slideshowslideshowsslide shows
Slide shows originally consisted of a series of individual photographic slides projected onto a screen with a slide projector.

Loupe

Handlens/loupejeweler's loupejewelers loupe
In traditional newsrooms and magazine offices slides were viewed using a lightbox and a loupe, this allowed rapid side by side comparison of similar images.
Analog (film) photographers use loupes to review, edit or analyze negatives and slides on a light table.

Polavision

PolachromePolapan
Polaroid produced an instant slide film called Polachrome.
In 1983 Polaroid introduced an "instant" transparency (slide film) system for still photography.

Camera

camerasstill cameraplate camera
A slide copier is a simple optical device that can be fastened to the lens mount of a camera to enable slide duplicates to be made.
Print film requires the developed film negative to be printed onto photographic paper or transparency.

Film stock

filmmotion picture filmstock
Reversal film is sometimes used as motion picture film, mostly in the 16 mm, Super 8 and 8 mm "cine" formats, to yield a positive image on the camera original.
Technicolor introduced a colour reversal stock, called Monopack, for location shooting in 1941; it was ultimately a 35 mm version of Kodachrome that could be used in standard motion picture cameras.

Positive (photography)

positivepositivespositive image
In photography, reversal film is a type of photographic film that produces a positive image on a transparent base.