Rhetorical question

rhetoricallyrhetorically askingrhetorically asksasked rhetoricallyasks the audience rhetoricallybears defecating in the woodsdoes a bear shit in the woodserotemaquestionquestion is rhetorical
A rhetorical question is a figure of speech in the form of a question that is asked to make a point rather than to elicit an answer.wikipedia
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Question

answerwh-questionquestions
A rhetorical question is a figure of speech in the form of a question that is asked to make a point rather than to elicit an answer.
Rhetorical questions, for example, are interrogative in form but may not be considered true questions as they are not expected to be answered.

Figure of speech

figures of speechlocutionfigure
A rhetorical question is a figure of speech in the form of a question that is asked to make a point rather than to elicit an answer.
erotema: Synonym for rhetorical question

Irony punctuation

irony markpercontation point(?)
In the 1580s, English printer Henry Denham invented a "rhetorical question mark" for use at the end of a rhetorical question; however, it fell out of use in the 17th century.
, a reversed question mark later referred to as a rhetorical question mark, was proposed by Henry Denham in the 1580s and was used at the end of a question that does not require an answer—a rhetorical question.

Aporia

aporeticaporeticallyquizzicality
Aporia
Aporia is also a rhetorical device whereby the speaker expresses a doubt—often feigned—about his position or asks the audience rhetorically how he or she should proceed.

Monty Python's Life of Brian

Life of BrianThe Life of Brianalways look on the bright side of life
In the example, What have the Romans ever done for us? (Monty Python's Life of Brian) the question functions as a negative assertion.

Mark Antony

Marcus AntoniusAntonyMark Anthony
When Shakespeare's Mark Antony exclaims: ''Here was a Caesar!

Sarcasm

sarcasticsarcasticallysardonic
Negative assertions may function as positives in sarcastic contexts.

Metaphor

metaphorsmetaphoricalmetaphorically
Rhetorical questions are often used as a metaphor for a question already asked.

Maria (Rodgers and Hammerstein song)

MariaHow Do You Solve A Problem Like Maria?A Problem Like Maria
Examples may be found in the song Maria from the 1959 Rodgers and Hammerstein musical, The Sound of Music, in which the How do you solve a problem like Maria? is repeatedly answered with another question: How do you catch a cloud and pin it down?, How do you keep a wave upon the sand? and How do you hold a moonbeam in your hand? These responses may be taken as asserting that "the problem of Maria" cannot be solved; and furthermore the choice of cloud, wave and moonbeam as metaphors for Maria give insight into her character and the nature of the problem.

Rodgers and Hammerstein

Rodgers & HammersteinRichard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein IIcomposer Richard Rodgers and librettist Oscar Hammerstein II
Examples may be found in the song Maria from the 1959 Rodgers and Hammerstein musical, The Sound of Music, in which the How do you solve a problem like Maria? is repeatedly answered with another question: How do you catch a cloud and pin it down?, How do you keep a wave upon the sand? and How do you hold a moonbeam in your hand? These responses may be taken as asserting that "the problem of Maria" cannot be solved; and furthermore the choice of cloud, wave and moonbeam as metaphors for Maria give insight into her character and the nature of the problem.

The Sound of Music

Sound of MusicBroadway musical1959 Broadway musical
Examples may be found in the song Maria from the 1959 Rodgers and Hammerstein musical, The Sound of Music, in which the How do you solve a problem like Maria? is repeatedly answered with another question: How do you catch a cloud and pin it down?, How do you keep a wave upon the sand? and How do you hold a moonbeam in your hand? These responses may be taken as asserting that "the problem of Maria" cannot be solved; and furthermore the choice of cloud, wave and moonbeam as metaphors for Maria give insight into her character and the nature of the problem.

Bob Dylan

DylanDylanesqueB. Dylan
Similarly in the Bob Dylan song "Blowin' in the Wind", the rhetorical question is asked, "And how many deaths will it take till we know, that too many people have died?"

Blowin' in the Wind

Blowin 'in the WindDie Antwort weiß ganz allein der Wind
Similarly in the Bob Dylan song "Blowin' in the Wind", the rhetorical question is asked, "And how many deaths will it take till we know, that too many people have died?"
Although it has been described as a protest song, it poses a series of rhetorical questions about peace, war, and freedom.

Henry Denham

In the 1580s, English printer Henry Denham invented a "rhetorical question mark" for use at the end of a rhetorical question; however, it fell out of use in the 17th century.

Thought experiment

thought experimentsgedanken experimenthypothetical question
Hypothetical question

Complex question

trick questionfallacy of many questionsleading questions
Complex question

Double-barreled question

compound questiondouble barrelled questionmore than one issue
Double-barreled question

Loaded question

Fallacy of many questionsWhen did you stop beating your wife?biased
Loaded question