Rib cage

ribsribcagefirst ribcostal groovefloating ribribtwelfth ribfalse ribsfloating ribsthoracic cage
The rib cage is the arrangement of ribs attached to the vertebral column and sternum in the thorax of most vertebrates, that encloses and protects the heart and lungs.wikipedia
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Rib

costalcostaerib cage
The rib cage is the arrangement of ribs attached to the vertebral column and sternum in the thorax of most vertebrates, that encloses and protects the heart and lungs.
In vertebrate anatomy, ribs (costae) are the long curved bones which form the rib cage, part of the axial skeleton.

Cartilage

cartilaginouscartilagescartilagenous
In humans, the rib cage, also known as the thoracic cage, is a bony and cartilaginous structure which surrounds the thoracic cavity and supports the shoulder girdle to form the core part of the human skeleton.
Cartilage is a resilient and smooth elastic tissue, a rubber-like padding that covers and protects the ends of long bones at the joints, and is a structural component of the rib cage, the ear, the nose, the bronchial tubes, the intervertebral discs, and many other body components.

Thorax

chestthoracicthoraces
The rib cage is the arrangement of ribs attached to the vertebral column and sternum in the thorax of most vertebrates, that encloses and protects the heart and lungs.
It is mostly protected and supported by the rib cage, spine, and shoulder girdle.

Thoracic cavity

chest cavityintrathoracicthoracic
In humans, the rib cage, also known as the thoracic cage, is a bony and cartilaginous structure which surrounds the thoracic cavity and supports the shoulder girdle to form the core part of the human skeleton.
The thoracic cavity (or chest cavity) is the chamber of the body of vertebrates that is protected by the thoracic wall (rib cage and associated skin, muscle, and fascia).

Human skeleton

skeletonskeletalskeletons
In humans, the rib cage, also known as the thoracic cage, is a bony and cartilaginous structure which surrounds the thoracic cavity and supports the shoulder girdle to form the core part of the human skeleton.
The axial skeleton is formed by the vertebral column, the rib cage, the skull and other associated bones.

Lung

lungspulmonaryright lung
The rib cage is the arrangement of ribs attached to the vertebral column and sternum in the thorax of most vertebrates, that encloses and protects the heart and lungs.
The lungs are located in the chest on either side of the heart in the rib cage.

Shoulder girdle

pectoral girdlepectoralshoulder
In humans, the rib cage, also known as the thoracic cage, is a bony and cartilaginous structure which surrounds the thoracic cavity and supports the shoulder girdle to form the core part of the human skeleton.
No anatomical joint exists between each scapula and the rib cage; instead the muscular connection or physiological joint between the two permits great mobility of the shoulder girdle compared to the compact pelvic girdle; because the upper limb is not usually involved in weight bearing, its stability has been sacrificed in exchange for greater mobility.

Sternum

manubriumbreastbonesternal
The rib cage is the arrangement of ribs attached to the vertebral column and sternum in the thorax of most vertebrates, that encloses and protects the heart and lungs.
It connects to the ribs via cartilage and forms the front of the rib cage, thus helping to protect the heart, lungs, and major blood vessels from injury.

Intercostal arteries

Posterior intercostal arteriesposterior intercostal arterymusculophrenic artery
The spaces between the ribs are known as intercostal spaces; they contain the intercostal muscles, and neurovascular bundles containing nerves, arteries, and veins.
The intercostal arteries are a group of arteries that supply the area between the ribs ("costae"), called the intercostal space.

Intercostal muscle

intercostalIntercostalesintercostals
The spaces between the ribs are known as intercostal spaces; they contain the intercostal muscles, and neurovascular bundles containing nerves, arteries, and veins.
Intercostal muscles are several groups of muscles that run between the ribs, and help form and move the chest wall.

Bone

cortical bonebone tissuecancellous bone
In humans, the rib cage, also known as the thoracic cage, is a bony and cartilaginous structure which surrounds the thoracic cavity and supports the shoulder girdle to form the core part of the human skeleton.
Bones protect internal organs, such as the skull protecting the brain or the ribs protecting the heart and lungs.

Intercostal veins

intercostal veinveins
The spaces between the ribs are known as intercostal spaces; they contain the intercostal muscles, and neurovascular bundles containing nerves, arteries, and veins.
The intercostal veins are a group of veins which drain the area between the ribs ("costae"), called the intercostal space.

Vertebra

vertebraeneural spineneural arch
The phrase floating rib (costae fluctuantes) refers to the two lowermost, the eleventh and twelfth rib pairs; so-called because they are attached only to the vertebrae–and not to the sternum or cartilage of the sternum.
There is a facet on each of the transverse processes of thoracic vertebrae which articulates with the tubercle of the rib.

Thoracic vertebrae

dorsal vertebraethoracic vertebrathoracic
A typical human rib cage consists of 24 ribs in 12 pairs, the sternum and xiphoid process, the costal cartilages, and the 12 thoracic vertebrae.
They are distinguished by the presence of facets on the sides of the bodies for articulation with the heads of the ribs, as well as facets on the transverse processes of all, except the eleventh and twelfth, for articulation with the tubercles of the ribs.

Xiphoid process

xiphisternumxiphoid cartilagexiphosternal junction
A typical human rib cage consists of 24 ribs in 12 pairs, the sternum and xiphoid process, the costal cartilages, and the 12 thoracic vertebrae.
Much the way the first seven ribs articulate with the sternum, the cartilage in the celiac plexus joins on the xiphoid process, reinforcing it, and indirectly attaches the costal cartilage to the sternum.

Thoracic wall

chest wallthoracic walls
Together with the skin and associated fascia and muscles, the rib cage makes up the thoracic wall and provides attachments for the muscles of the neck, thorax, upper abdomen, and back.
The bony skeletal part of the thoracic wall is the rib cage, and the rest is made up of muscle, skin, and fasciae.

Scalene muscles

scalenus anterioranterior scalenescalenus medius
The upper surface of the body is marked by two shallow grooves, separated from each other by a slight ridge prolonged internally into a tubercle, the scalene tubercle, for the attachment of the anterior scalene; the anterior groove transmits the subclavian vein, the posterior the subclavian artery and the lowest trunk of the brachial plexus.
The anterior and middle scalene muscles lift the first rib and bend the neck to the same side; the posterior scalene lifts the second rib and tilts the neck to the same side.

Subclavian vein

subclavian veinssubclavianRight subclavian vein
The upper surface of the body is marked by two shallow grooves, separated from each other by a slight ridge prolonged internally into a tubercle, the scalene tubercle, for the attachment of the anterior scalene; the anterior groove transmits the subclavian vein, the posterior the subclavian artery and the lowest trunk of the brachial plexus.
Each subclavian vein is a continuation of the axillary vein and runs from the outer border of the first rib to the medial border of anterior scalene muscle.

Lumbar vertebrae

lumbar vertebralumbar spinelumbar
The ninth rib has a frontal part at the same level as the first lumbar vertebra.
The lumbar vertebrae are, in human anatomy, the five vertebrae between the rib cage and the pelvis.

Transversus thoracis muscle

transversus thoracis
The transversus thoracis muscle is innervated by one of the intercostal nerves and superiorly attaches at the posterior surface of the lower sternum.
The transversus thoracis muscle lies internal to the thoracic cage, anteriorly.

Core (anatomy)

coreaxial musculaturecore body
In humans, the rib cage, also known as the thoracic cage, is a bony and cartilaginous structure which surrounds the thoracic cavity and supports the shoulder girdle to form the core part of the human skeleton.
The core muscles align the spine, ribs, and pelvis of a person to resist a specific force, whether static or dynamic.

Flat bone

flatflat bonesbasal plate
The sternum is a long, flat bone that forms the front of the rib cage.
These bones are expanded into broad, flat plates, as in the cranium (skull), the ilium (pelvis), sternum and the rib cage.

Flail chest

multiple rib fractures
When several adjacent ribs incur two or more fractures each, this can result in a flail chest which is a life-threatening condition.
Flail chest is a life-threatening medical condition that occurs when a segment of the rib cage breaks due to trauma and becomes detached from the rest of the chest wall.

Respiratory system

respiratoryrespirationrespiratory organs
The human rib cage is a component of the human respiratory system.
As the diaphragm contracts, the rib cage is simultaneously enlarged by the ribs being pulled upwards by the intercostal muscles as shown in Fig.

Pectus excavatum

funnel chestchest indentabnormal indentation
Abnormalities of the rib cage include pectus excavatum ("sunken chest") and pectus carinatum ("pigeon chest").
Pectus excavatum is a structural deformity of the anterior thoracic wall in which the sternum and rib cage are shaped abnormally.