Richard Nixon's resignation speech

resignation speechNixon's resignationaddressing the nation on television the previous eveningannounces his intention to resign the presidencyannounces his resignationannouncing his resignation from officehe informed the nationhis resignation speechI Have Never Been a Quitternationally televised address
Richard Nixon's resignation speech was an address made on August 8, 1974, by President of the United States Richard Nixon to the American public.wikipedia
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Oval Office

Bow WindowEric Gugleroffice
It was delivered in the Oval Office.
Examples include Kennedy presenting news of the Cuban Missile Crisis (1962), Nixon [[SP 3-125: Richard Nixon's address announcing his intention to resign the presidency|announcing his resignation from office]] (1974), Ronald Reagan following the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster (1986), and George W. Bush in the wake of the September 11 attacks (2001).

Watergate scandal

WatergateWatergate break-inWatergate burglaries
The purpose of the speech was for Nixon, who had been intimately involved in the events surrounding the Watergate scandal that occurred during his controversial re-election campaign in 1972, to announce to the nation that he was resigning from office.
In a nationally televised address from the Oval Office on the evening of August 8, 1974, the president said, in part:

Ray Price (speechwriter)

Ray PriceRaymond PricePrice, Raymond
The president's speechwriter Raymond K. Price wrote the resignation speech.
Raymond Kissam Price, Jr. (May 6, 1930 – February 13, 2019) was an American writer who was the chief speechwriter for U.S. President Richard Nixon, working on both inaugural addresses, his resignation speech, and Gerald Ford's pardon speech.

Richard Nixon

Richard M. NixonNixonPresident Nixon
Richard Nixon's resignation speech was an address made on August 8, 1974, by President of the United States Richard Nixon to the American public. With the release on August 5, 1974 of several taped Oval Office conversations, one of which was the "smoking gun" tape, recorded soon after the break-in, and which demonstrated that Richard Nixon had been told of the White House connection to the Watergate burglaries soon after they took place, and had approved plans to thwart the investigation, Nixon's popular support all but evaporated, and his political support collapsed.
In light of his loss of political support and the near-certainty that he would be impeached and removed from office, Nixon resigned the presidency on August 9, 1974, after addressing the nation on television the previous evening.

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. PresidentUnited States President
Richard Nixon's resignation speech was an address made on August 8, 1974, by President of the United States Richard Nixon to the American public.

1972 United States presidential election

19721972 presidential election1972 election
The purpose of the speech was for Nixon, who had been intimately involved in the events surrounding the Watergate scandal that occurred during his controversial re-election campaign in 1972, to announce to the nation that he was resigning from office.

Impeachment in the United States

impeachmentimpeachedimpeach
Watergate had cost Nixon much of his political support, and at the time of his resignation, he faced almost certain impeachment and removal from office.

Incumbent

inc.incumbencyreelection
Nixon was the ninth (and most recent) incumbent president not to complete the four-year term to which they had been elected since the presidency was established in 1789.

Nixon White House tapes

Watergate tapesWhite House tapesNixon tapes
With the release on August 5, 1974 of several taped Oval Office conversations, one of which was the "smoking gun" tape, recorded soon after the break-in, and which demonstrated that Richard Nixon had been told of the White House connection to the Watergate burglaries soon after they took place, and had approved plans to thwart the investigation, Nixon's popular support all but evaporated, and his political support collapsed.

White House

The White HouseExecutive MansionPresident's House
With the release on August 5, 1974 of several taped Oval Office conversations, one of which was the "smoking gun" tape, recorded soon after the break-in, and which demonstrated that Richard Nixon had been told of the White House connection to the Watergate burglaries soon after they took place, and had approved plans to thwart the investigation, Nixon's popular support all but evaporated, and his political support collapsed.

Consent of the governed

consentcommon consentconsent of the Chinese people
With the release on August 5, 1974 of several taped Oval Office conversations, one of which was the "smoking gun" tape, recorded soon after the break-in, and which demonstrated that Richard Nixon had been told of the White House connection to the Watergate burglaries soon after they took place, and had approved plans to thwart the investigation, Nixon's popular support all but evaporated, and his political support collapsed.

Jack Nelson (journalist)

Jack Nelson
Jack Nelson of the Los Angeles Times wrote that Nixon's speech "chose to look ahead," rather than focus on his term.

Los Angeles Times

The Los Angeles TimesLA TimesL.A. Times
Jack Nelson of the Los Angeles Times wrote that Nixon's speech "chose to look ahead," rather than focus on his term.

Rhetoric

rhetoricianrhetorrhetorical
This attribute of the speech coincides with John Poulakos's definition of sophistical rhetoric in Towards a Sophistic Definition of Rhetoric, because Nixon met the criterion of "[seeking] to capture what was possible" instead of reflecting on his term.

The Times

TimesTimes Newspapers LtdTimes Online
In the British paper The Times the article Mr. Nixon resigns as President; On this day by Fred Emery took a more negative stance on the speech, characterizing Nixon's apology as "cursory" and attacking Nixon's definition of what it meant to serve a full presidential term.

Stephen E. Ambrose

Stephen AmbroseAmbrose, Stephen E.Ambrose, Stephen
In his book Nixon: Ruin and Recovery 1973-1990, Stephen Ambrose finds that response from United States media to Nixon's speech was generally favorable.

Roger Mudd

interview with Roger MuddMudd Center for EthicsMudd, Roger
This book cites Roger Mudd of CBS News as an example of someone who disliked the speech.

CBS News

CBSCBS NewspathCBSNews.com
This book cites Roger Mudd of CBS News as an example of someone who disliked the speech.

Sam Ervin

Sam J. ErvinSam J. Ervin Jr.Sam J. Ervin, Jr.
He is remembered for his work in the investigation committees that brought down Senator Joseph McCarthy in 1954 and especially for his investigation of the Watergate scandal in 1972 that led to the resignation of Richard Nixon.

Citizenship in a Republic

The Man in the ArenaMan In The ArenaMan in the Arena" speech
The "Man in the Arena" passage was quoted by another US president, Richard Nixon, both in his victory speech on November 6, 1968, and in his resignation address to the nation on August 8, 1974:

Moscow Summit (1974)

Moscow Summit
The visit was the final one of Nixon's presidency as he would give his resignation speech in August of that year.

Simon Burns

Sir Simon BurnsSimon Burns MP
Following the Watergate scandal and [[SP 3-125: Presidential Address Announcing His Intention to Resign the Oval Office|Nixon's subsequent resignation in 1974]], Burns would comment that McGovern's campaign had "won the argument, even if we lost the vote".